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Features

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    SHALLOTTE—A love for the water and the area’s many treasures has led one lifelong photographer to change her focus to art and share the beauty she sees behind her lens with others.

    Gray Laughridge Wells has worked in the photography field for more than 30 years. She spent 20 years working for the Star News before venturing on her own and embarking on a career in real-estate photography.

  • The summer triangle is finally up in the east as the sun sets. This is a starry indicator that summer is here. 

  • SUNSET BEACH—Summer at the Old Bridge regularly features local speakers on a variety of topics related to the old Sunset Beach Bridge. Most recently Ed Gore and Bill Bradford shared stories.

    Gore, whose father Mannon C. Gore built the original bridge, talked about how his father worked on the bridge at his shop near Twin Lakes Restaurant. Seated on lawn chairs under live oaks, a group of locals and visitors listened with interest. Mannon Gore also built a bridge to Figure Eight Island.

  • After dinner in late spring is a perfect time to go for a stroll on the beach. Look south and check out the centaur carrying a wild animal to the altar. 

  •   A crowd of 130 and 15 celebrity waiters were in the spotlight at the first Celebrity Waiter Dinner, a Roaring ’20s-themed fundraiser May 12 at Sea Trail to benefit The Ruth House, a nonprofit, future Christian-based home and program for teenage girls.

    Celebrity waiters served patrons tossed salad, rolls, prime rib, Dijon-crusted salmon and double-chocolate torte.

  • CALABASH—Carolyn Schreiber used to sell her homegrown plants in front of her house on Persimmon Road.

    “It got to be too much,” said Schreiber, who has one of the greenest thumbs in Calabash.

    “I couldn’t [sell] every day, but I love it here,” said Schreiber, tending to her flowers and plants arranged on a little cart she had driven over to the Calabash Farmers Market last Saturday.

  • This week marks a dual celebration for Brunswick Arts Council.

    With the council’s seventh annual Miniature Masterpieces gala and fundraiser set for Friday, May 20, the umbrella arts group is also observing its 30th anniversary.

    Jeanette Serens, the council’s new president as of last September, notes the council was started in May 1981 by a small group of artists who had gotten to know each other in the Bolivia and Southport area.

  • Abby, a rescued pit bull mix, has become the center of attention at Arlette Von Arsdale’s house in Brunswick Plantation.

    Just a few weeks ago, Abby was homeless and awaiting adoption at the North Myrtle Beach, S.C., Animal Shelter.

    That was before she and her potential were discovered by Rick Kaplan, president of Canine Angels, a nonprofit that rescues homeless dogs, finds willing foster parents like Von Arsdale, and provides training for the dogs to become service dogs for disabled veterans free of charge.

  • The evening spring sky has all the components to make a great fairy tale. Stretching from the north to the east, someone with an overactive imagination can invent a perfect “guy saves gal” story. 

  •  ASH—Life in Ash wasn’t always the way it is today.

    “This dirt we are living on was my great granddaddy’s,” said Leroy Carlisle. “He owned a hundred acres from Old Brunswick Road to the Whit-Ash Swamp. There were farms on both sides of the swamp.”

    Leroy’s grandfather built the house he grew up in the 1850s before the Civil War.

  • CALABASH—Nancy Pate clutched photos of her late husband, Allen, as she and other family members gathered in the parking lot of the Hurricane Fleet fishing charter.

    The Jacksonville resident was among three families who gathered there April 8 to personalize eternal reef balls cast of eco-friendly cement and cremated ashes in their loved ones’ memory.

  • Here is the big and little scoop with the spring sky. Not only are there two scoops in the sky but a big ice cream cone as well. In addition, one scoop of ice cream from that big cone slid off. 

  • For the 13th year, the St. James Service Club is proud to present its annual flea market on Saturday, April 30, at Brunswick Community College in Supply. The doors will open at 8 a.m. and close at 1 p.m. This very popular event is attended by hundreds of area residents.

    The St. James Service Club is a nonprofit organization dedicated to identifying and supporting the needs of the community through volunteer participation and fundraising. All proceeds from the flea market will be used to meet the mission of the

    St. James Service Club.

  • ST. JAMES—Twenty Wounded Women Warriors got a heroes’ welcome as they pedaled through town last Thursday.

    The women, each of whom have sustained wartime injuries as a result of their military service in the Middle East and elsewhere, proved their stamina and dedication as they took part in a 16-mile ride through the community off N.C. 211.

  • He’s a lifelong artist, cook and, up until a few years ago, chemist.

    Jakobus ‘Co’ Bungener has stirred up a little bit of everything in his multi-faceted life.

    But there’s one thing the 76-year-old resident of Shallotte Assisted Living has never done. He’s never had his own art show.

  • Adelina Filocamo reached another milestone as she turned 102 last week at Shallotte Assisted Living. Family and friends were on hand to wish the centenarian well at the March 18 celebration.

    Filocamo was born in Brazil and grew up in Italy. She also lived in New York and worked as a seamstress. She drove until she was 90, said Matresse McAllister, administrator at Shallotte Assisted Living.

    Filocamo is a familiar sight at the Mulberry Street facility, where she has lived for the past two years with Marco, her prized, purebred Shih Tzu dog.