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Features

  • We are approaching one of the most beautiful times of the year, the seasonal changes that occur between the coastal plain, piedmont and the mountains provide us with an extended viewing of the colors of leaves as winter approaches.

    A trip through North Carolina in the next few weeks will dazzle your eyes. After viewing the magnificence of the mountains in full color, you can almost wear your eyes out.

  • Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Katherine Suzanne Stewart and Kevin Ray Brown, both of Wilmington. The bride-elect is the daughter of Gordon and Lisa Winfree of Shallotte and the granddaughter of Bobby and Leatrice Smith of Shalotte, Virginia Winfree of Shallotte and the late Gene Winfree. The prospective groom is the son of Katherine Brown of Wilmington and John E. Brown of Charleston, S.C., and the grandson of Mildred Brown, the late Cecil Brown, Eleanor Vassey of South Gouldsboro, Maine, and the late Edward Vassey.

  • Taylor Elyse Galloway of Supply and Scott Andrew Johnson of Fuquay-Varina were married June 27 at Holden Beach Chapel. The Rev. Richard Vaughan officiated the ceremony.

    The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph R. Galloway of Supply. She was given in marriage by her parents and escorted by her father.

    The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Johnson of Salisbury.

  • Patricia and Chris Ellis of Wilson are the parents of a daughter, Kaley Michelle Ellis, born at 11:15 a.m. July 2, at Pitt County Memorial Hospital.

    She weighed 7 pounds, 8 ounces and measured 19 inches long. She joins a sister, Taylor Brooke Ells, 2.

    Maternal grandmother is Cyndi Croom of Longwood.

    Paternal grandparents are Wayne and Rhonda Ellis of Selma.

    Great-grandparents are Frank and Mary Lewis of Shallotte, Ruth Agee of Shallotte, Kathy Williams of Bladenboro and the late R.T. Williams and Bill and Bobbie Ellis of Dunn.

  • Summer is over. The calendar may remind us this doesn’t occur until Sept. 22, but we all know summer is over.

    Weeks ago, children returned to school day schedules. Tourist prices on cottages have been reduced to off-season rates. Days are shorter and nights are longer. Visiting friends and relatives, and the carefree hours enjoyed in their presence, have been replaced with a more routinized daily life. Change is in the air, the very air we breathe.

  • Sunset River Marketplace will feature “Focus On the Coast, a Collection by Brooks Pearce Honoring the National Audubon Society” from Monday, Aug. 24, through Saturday Oct. 3.

    A reception to meet the artist will be from 2-5 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 29, at the gallery.

    Living in southeastern N.C. since 1973, works by Pearce have been recognized by the S.C. Wildlife Federation, and she was commissioned by the N.C. Wildlife Resource Commission to produce a series of Endangered Species posters.

  • Two-thirds of the population of the United States is overweight, so lots of us are looking for ways to drop some pounds.

    Most want the quick fix with the latest magic pill or the 21st century equivalent of the grape fruit diet. While losing weight may be difficult, the basic concept is simple: burn more calories than you eat.

    If hanging out at the gym isn’t your cup of tea, try these tasks that will get your heart pumping and help your garden as we move into the cooler months of fall:

  • Just when you thought it was safe to go outside, along comes a host of other biters, stingers and other “ne’er do wells."

    Fire ants are on the prowl and are foraging for food and possibly just trying to get out of the heat and into our air-conditioned homes.

    Fire ants will be building and expanding their mounds throughout the rest of the warm season in preparation for winter. Treat mounds with fire ant baits or other commercially available control products. Please follow label directions for best control.

  • Individuals not planning to grow a fall garden should make it a practice to rid the garden site of old vegetable crop residue and weeds as soon as possible. Failure to destroy spent vegetable plants will likely increase insect and disease problems next season.

  • Jennifer Kathleen Polomis and Kristopher Scott-William Mackey, both of Bratenahl, Ohio, were married June 27 at Brunswick Plantation, with the Rev. John Causey of Shallotte Presbyterian Church officiating.

    The bride is the daughter of the late Michelle J. Polomis and the granddaughter of Dwight and Kathleen Peterson of Shallotte.

    She was given in marriage by her grandparents and escorted by her grandfather.

    The groom is the son of Thomas and Christine Mackey of Concord, Ohio.

  • Anna Milliken of Ash and Gary Woodard of Ash were married May 23 at Soldier Bay Baptist Church in Ash, with the Rev. Regan Mintz and the Rev. Charlie Smith officiating.

    The bride is the daughter of Terry and Lois Milliken of Ash. She was given in marriage and escorted by her father.

    She wore a strapless white gown by Justin Alexander with sweetheart neckline in soft satin and alencon lace, beaded with sequins and beads with a semi-cathedral-length train and a simple white veil.

    She carried a bouquet of stargazer lilies and hot pink and pale pink roses.

  • Larry and Crystal Helms of Supply are the parents of a son, William Joseph Helms, born at 4:45 a.m. June 29 at Brunswick Community Hospital.

    He weighed 6 pounds, 15 ounces and measured 19 1/2 inches long.

    He joins a sister, Grace Helms, 10.

    Maternal grnadparents are Harlee Bordeaux of Supply, the late Douglas L. McKeithan and the late Shirley Bordeaux.

    Paternal grandparents are Larry E. Helms Sr. and Beverly Helms of Supply.

  • Life can be funny. We make plans. God smiles. Stuff happens. How do I know this? I’ve read books that proclaim the fact. I’ve listened to people who have told me stories that verify it. Just this past week, my own life was suddenly, unexpectedly, turned around. All my plans went kaput. That’s how I know it.

  • Local “swamp rock” band Blackwater Outlaws, based in Ash, are scheduled to play at the Friends of America Rally on Labor Day, Sept. 7, in Holden, W.Va., alongside such venerable “outlaw” musicians as Hank Williams Jr. and John Rich of the country duo Big and Rich.

    “We’re very excited,” said band member Travis Norris. “I’m kind of at a loss for words over how excited we are.”

  • You say Mars will be as big as the full moon—what a sight on Aug. 27. Everyone run outside, gaze upward and then yell, “April fools.”

    Just like Christmas cards in December, in July false e-mails about Mars arrive in our inbox to tell us all about this once in-a-lifetime event.

    It has happened every year since August 2003. When Mars was close to us, it was still only a bright spot in the sky, not the size of the full moon. The quote from NASA was: “If you use a good backyard telescope, Mars would appear to be the same as the full moon.”

  • One of the great plant success stories of recent years has to be Encore azaleas. Developed by azalea breeder Buddy Lee of Independence, La., this group of evergreen plants provides decent spring color and an even better flower show in the fall. Twenty-three selections of Encore azaleas are currently available. Visit www.encoreazalea.com to see the forms and flower colors.

    Rather than list a lot of information you can find elsewhere, included are some personal observations about this great group of plants:

  • The primary tip for this month is to avoid the heat. There will be better temperatures for gardening someday. The same 95-degree temperature you tolerate one day can give you heat exhaustion on another day; or more likely, the same temperature you tolerated as a kid can lay you out as an older adult.

    A headache and an upset stomach could be warning signs of heat exhaustion. Heat exhaustion can be reversed if you cool off and rest.

  • Nitrogen fertility has a significant impact on Large Patch development. High nitrogen levels promote the growth of soft, succulent leaves that are susceptible to attack by the large patch fungus.

    To help prevent disease outbreaks, apply a low rate of a nitrogen fertilizer at four to eight week intervals or use a slow-release nitrogen source to maintain an even growth rate. To reduce disease outbreaks during the winter and early spring, avoid fall applications of nitrogen fertilizer. Finally, maintain phosphorus and potash fertility levels according to soil test recommendations.

  • Casey Elizabeth Reeves of Ocean Isle Beach and Bryan Scott Rowley of Southport were married July 12 on the Southport Waterfront.

    The bride is the daughter of Peggy and David Reeves of Ocean Isle Beach.

    The bride was given in marriage and escorted by her son, Joseph Taylor Stanley.

    The bride’s niece, Brianna Leonard, served as flower girl.

    The groom is the son of Connie and Mike Rowley of Supply.

    His son, Bryce Edward Rowley, served as best man.

  • Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Hailee Nicole Vanover of Greeneville, Tenn., and Jeffrey Lynn Campbell of Midway, Tenn. The bride-elect is the daughter of Lee and Lisa Vanover of Greeneville, Tenn., and the granddaughter of Mickey and Vivan Smith of Supply. The prospective groom is the son of Eva and Alan Campbell of Midway, Tenn. The couple was engaged on Holden Beach in June and will also spend their honeymoon at Holden Beach.