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Features

  • Yes, that’s right, it’s our solar system. Our sun is just one of 200 billion stars all locked on a gravity merry-go-round. We all revolve in a circle around a black hole known as Sagittarius A.

  • Four years ago, life turned upside down for Carolina Shores resident Shirley Tacchetti. She discovered something all women fear—a lump in her breast.

    She recalls discovering the lump one morning as she was getting out of the shower. Tacchetti was new to Brunswick County, having relocated from Maryland in October 2006. She found the lump in February 2007.

  • SUPPLY—Dr. Patrick Maguire, oncologist with South Atlantic Radiation Oncology Center, has spent his life’s work helping others fight cancer. He lost his father to cancer and both of his in-laws.

    During his personal and professional battles with cancer, Maguire discovered a need and sought to fill it. As an oncologist he is frequently asked questions ranging from what is cancer to how could I have prevented this?

  • Cancer can rob women of their energy, appetite and strength. But one program aims to make sure it doesn’t take away their self-confidence.

    Look Good Feel Better, an American Cancer Society program in partnership with the National Cosmetology Association and the Personal Care Products Council Foundation, offers a free, non-medical program designed to lift the spirits of women battling cancer. The program teaches beauty techniques to cancer patients in active treatment to help them combat appearance-related side effects.

  • London Gore believes in the power of prayer, even if it takes more than six decades to be answered.

    That’s what the 87-year-old Shallotte resident and World War II veteran had been doing all those years in hopes of finding the family of Sgt. Michael Dicky, his Army tank commander and good friend who was killed before Gore’s eyes during the Normandy campaign on Aug. 13, 1944.

    Credit Charlotte resident and World War II buff Jerry Evers for providing assistance.

  • “More Legends: Tales and Traditions of Brunswick County and Southeastern North Carolina” is the latest book published by local author Christy Judah.

    “More Legends” provides a personal glimpse into life on the coast from the Green Swamps to Rabontown, Exum, Sunset Beach and Southport...to Leland and all points in between where the histories of unincorporated community areas are detailed.

  • OCEAN ISLE BEACH—It’s been more than four months since Gunner was brought to Cat Tails, a no-kill feline rescue facility.

    But the large orange tabby cat apparently hasn’t forgotten the home he used to have.

    Last fall, Gunner’s former owner, a Wilmington man, gave up the 6-year-old cat after getting married. The man said his new wife was allergic to cats, and she also had dogs, according to Cat Tails workers.

  • LITTLE RIVER, S.C.—“Did you find everything you need?” cashier Marie Feda asks one of many customers on a busy workday at Lowes Foods.

    “Plastic OK?” her husband, Sam Feda, follows up as he bags the customer’s groceries at the end of the checkout where he and his wife often work in tandem.

    The senior couple from Calabash are among those who have been working at the store since it first opened in summer 2006, part of the hard-working team at the store frequented by Brunswick County residents.

  • By Mark Jankowski
    Ingram Planetarium Director

    The twins, a crab, a rabbit, two dogs, a bull, a hunter and even a dove can be seen looking down from the winter sky. The weather lately has really given us the feeling that winter is here. Go out on a clear night, look up, and the stars reveal that winter is here. The same as they have done for eons. At 9 p.m. everyone is up, at least everyone regarding the winter constellations. Time for star school and a lesson in winter star groups.

  • CALABASH—Rector Sisk can’t stay out of the restaurant business.

    Last year, the Calabash restaurateur enjoyed a brief respite after selling his longtime breakfast eatery, Sunrise Pancake House.

    It wasn’t long before Sisk and his son Jeff took over operations at Martini’s, a popular restaurant and piano bar less than 10 miles down the road in North Myrtle Beach, S.C., where Sisk has left most of the management to Jeff.

  • A bull is guarding the palace, traveling across the sky during New Year’s and is a vessel on earth for the soul of Osiris. 

    This bull has many stories to tell as it reigns supreme in the early winter sky. 

    Across the globe, cultures viewing a certain bright star group imagined a bull; however, the beliefs about this bull vary. Therefore, it is an interesting study of history and a notable constellation worth finding. 

  • By Mark Jankowski
    Ingram Planetarium Director

    In the eastern sky, right after dark, a hero is rising and soon will take his place as the ruler of the early evening winter sky. 

    At the same time, over in the west, a cross adorns the sky a symbol of the present season. As the sun’s light fades away, the early evening’s darkness reveals two groups of stars in the shape of a cross and a bright rectangle. The weather is reflecting winter and so are the stars.

  • Patricia Bell and Rhonda Varnam believe in the power of prayer.

    As overseers of their respective ministries, Lamb of God (Bell) and Called and Anointed (Varnam), it’s only natural.

    But when Bell started praying for wheels to replace vehicles that are barely getting by, she got more than she bargained for. She got a bus.

  • The Island Home Tour and Island Good Time was a success, according to event organizers. More than 250 people came out to support the annual fundraiser for the Ocean Isle Museum Foundation’s two facilities: the Museum of Coastal Carolina and Ingram Planetarium.

  • At 101, Adelina Filocamo and her dog Marco walking on a leash by her side are a familiar sight at Shallotte Assisted Living.

    Connecticut natives Nick and Lillian Szeszkowski celebrated their 71st wedding anniversary this past September.

    And Isaac Hardy, 72, is known for the regular walks he goes on around Shallotte, returning to the Mulberry Street facility later in the day.

  • The 16th annual Arts by the Shore art show took place at the Oak Island Recreation Center Nov. 19-21.

    The reception and awards ceremony on Sunday, Nov. 21, was hosted by Roger Tatum, president of the Oak Island Art Guild; Joyce Grazetti, chairman of the Oak Island Art Guild ABTS Committee; and Billie Jayroe, representative of Oak Island Parks & Recreation. The show was co-sponsored by the Oak Island Art Guild and Oak Island Parks & Recreation.

  • Mark Jankowski
    Ingram Planetarium Planetarium Director

    Now you see it, now you don’t. Watch the moon this month and you will see it disappear right before your very own eyes. No special effects or camera tricks are needed. It is just Earth blocking the sun’s light from reaching the moon. The name given to this full moon is the Full Cold Moon, and during the night of this particular moon, there will be a total lunar eclipse for everyone to enjoy. 

  • Mark Jankowski
    Ingram Planetarium Planetarium educator

    Get ready for strange things in the sky—a Full Beaver Moon; horns that never run empty and an ancient chariot racer holding a goat, plus two kids. 

    Yep, all this weird stuff in the sky and all we see is a random scattering of stars across the heavens. 

    Using a sky map as a treasure map you can reveal all the hidden stories of old and even see a ram with a fly buzzing around his tail. 

  • Sunset River Marketplace art gallery in Calabash is featuring works by instructor Jane Truesdale’s pottery class in a show that opened Nov. 1 and runs through Dec. 4.

    The exhibit includes a range of hand-built and wheel-thrown clay pieces by Ann Kwarta, Mary Cross, Janet Archambault, Kate Stello, Kathie Wolk, Marlene Gaspersohn, Patricia Hanson, Barbara Valcenburg, Rose Beyer, Debbie Asbill, Vivian Swanson and Betsy Russell.