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Features

  • Busy bees keeping you busy?

    We have had some recent cold weather for this time of year and that may cause honeybees to seek out a new space to accommodate them. In the early spring, honeybee colonies may become overcrowded and then the bees send out a pheromone scent to alert the colony they need to move to another location. Unfortunately, they may end up somewhere inside your house or they may swarm to a nearby tree or shrub waiting for the scout bees to tell them where their next home will be.

  • Upon their return from a 16-day cruise to Europe, Florence and Bob Hopkins of Shallotte celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary May 9 with a renewal of their vows at St. Brendan's Catholic Church.

  • In the midst of all the dire news these days, television commentators, newspaper and magazine articles, Joe and Jane Q. Public all seem to be concentrating on the power of “hangin’ in.”

  • Daisy do

  • There are several horticultural requirements when you move to the South. Obviously, you must grow evergreen azaleas and camellias. You have to leave the lilacs behind—at least the common lilac (Syringa vulgaris). And, if you truly want to be a part of the southerner’s garden club, you need to grow gardenias.

    Since gardenias aren’t the easiest shrubs to grow, here is some information so you can enjoy the sweet smell of success with gardenias.

  • Never before has the demand for energy been as high—and never before have homeowners become so aware of the energy savings possible with landscaping, especially with the high cost of energy which has escalated over the last few years.

    Although it is not possible to control the weather, certain landscape practices can help modify the climate in and around your home.

  • All kinds of ripe produce are now just beginning to overflow from gardens and orchards and the one dish that really means “summertime” is the salad!

    With the abundance of fruits and vegetables this time of the year, just toss them into a salad bowl and enjoy them, with or without a dressing. Summer salads only require a nice, clear dressing, not a heavy, creamy dressing. For grilled zucchini, squash, eggplant or even fresh green beans, try using a garlicky or citrusy dressing.

  • Now is the time to get started on the warm season grass activities (e. g. Bermuda, Centipede, Zoysia, and St. Augustine). Seed, sprig, plug or plant rolls of sod now and throughout the summer in the Cape Fear region of North Carolina.

  • Crystal Driver and James Wemyss of Ocean Isle Beach were married April 18 at Orton Plantation Gardens with Judge Marion Warren officiating.

    The bride is the daughter of Tom and Shirley Driver of Supply.

    The groom is the son of Phil and Nancy Wemyss of Ocean Isle Beach.

    The bride was given in marriage and escorted by her father.

    She wore an ivory/champagne, satin A-line dress with a split front and gathered waist and beaded lace detail. She wore an ivory, elbow-length veil with beaded detail.

  • Susan Boyle from Britain is a name and a face that has been displayed across television screens worldwide. She has become a Cinderella icon, a woman whose ordinary appearance hid extraordinary talent.

    No one paid much attention to this 47-year-old who unabashedly admitted she had never been kissed. In fact, the only attention given her was mockery offered with expressions of blatant condescension.

    And then, she sang.

  • GRISSETTOWN—Call it a “thanks-for-putting-up-with-me” treat.

    Throughout May, Silver Coast Winery is hosting a “Tribute to Mothers Month,” providing complimentary wine tastings for the mothers and grandmothers who made us who we are today.

    “We’ve always done a festival or something every month,” explained winery owner MaryAnn Azzato. “This year, we pulled back a little bit, but we still wanted to do something special every month.”

    That’s how the “Tribute to Mothers Month” was born.

  • If you are looking for a gift for your mom for Mothers Day, give her the gift of time and some beautiful jewels. Spend some time outside this weekend looking at two jewels in the sky.

    Here’s how to locate them in the sky. First, enjoy the sunset and as the sun fades, the stars start to appear. As you look overhead and almost straight up, you’ll see Saturn. It is the brightest object and the second largest of the planets. Saturn is a great object to view in a telescope because you can see Saturn’s rings and larger moons.

  • Every region of the country has its favorite style of barbecue. Our favorite is “pulled-pork,” the popular Southern cuisine.

    While you might think people in the South are into barbecuing more than most, it’s actually more popular with those in the Northeast part of the country, followed by the North Central region, the South and then the West.

  • When Mother’s Day rolls around, I remember my childhood attempts at crayoned cards loaded with hearts and promises of wondrous behavior. As the years passed, I graduated, if that is what is was, to commercially produced sentiments embellished with additional memories of my mom’s nurturing presence. Sometimes, the cards were replete with Victorian laciness. Sometimes, they were rife with modern comedy. Always, they were heartfelt.

  • Teenagers living in foster care enjoyed a catered dinner and music with a deejay to celebrate the end of their spring break in Brunswick County.

    In between dancing and singing, the teens were educated on the benefits of the SAYSO (Strong Able Youth Speaking Out) program by Jean Harwell, program manager for Mentors 4 K.I.D.S. They met with Jamie Orrock, director of Brunswick County DSS, as well as the president of the WAVES 4 K.I.D.S. Board of Directors, Kay Wolf, and other prospective mentors.

  • One of the wonderful things about having a garden is the opportunity to watch things grow. Of course, if you’re in the business of giving out horticultural advice, it’s also a great way to learn. I’ve always felt better about giving out recommendations based on local experience, so here are some musings about some plants that I’ve added to my own garden this year.

  • It is that time of year when people start putting in vegetable plants and suddenly they want to know if it is all right to plant them in a bed framed with treated lumber. Agents across the state have been e-mailing their thoughts and experiences. We have even contacted our resource people and they provide to us valuable back up assistance. Here are some interesting points I have gleaned from the discussion on how and where to use treated wood and which plants are okay to grow in systems containing treated wood.

  • Swine influenza (swine flu) is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza virus that regularly causes outbreaks of influenza in pigs. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans; however, sporadic human infections with swine flu have occurred. Most commonly, these cases occur in persons with direct exposure to pigs.

  • Gardeners are often unhappy about how their grass and other plants look in a shady area, especially under trees. People can spend a lot of money, time and effort trying to make sun-loving plants grow in shady areas. If you have a situation where shade is stressing the sun-loving grass of other plants, consider choosing plants that will thrive in a shady location.

    Gardening in the shade can and should be just as enjoyable and successful as gardening in the sun. When proper plants are selected for shady areas, the results can be beautiful and long lasting.

  • A team of 30 men and women from Holden Beach, other parts of North Carolina, Florida, Baltimore, and Virginia recently journeyed to the remote areas of Leon, Nicaragua, to do mission work to help those less fortunate.

    The team came from all walks of life, different professions, ages, special talents, and the desire to give of themselves, coming together with a common goal.