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Features

  • Survival techniques for certain plants provide that they be dormant during harsh weather and they grow and thrive during good weather. Problems arise when the weather becomes similar to springtime conditions and the plants respond by initiating new shoots, buds, leaves, flowers, etc.

  • Continuing with the discussion of how to invite birds to your home, the first thing to examine is the concept of living screens.

    Living Screens

    Hedges and rows of trees screen off unpleasant views and reduce noise from highways. In crowded neighborhoods, they offer privacy for your backyard activities and they attract birds to your place year after year. Juniper, autumn-olive, dogwood, cotoneaster, or a combination of these, make good living screens.

    Open Areas

  • As food budgets tighten, you often hear people claim, “it’s more expensive to eat healthy.” Smart shoppers know to look for fresh fruits and vegetables in season and on sale. They also know there are some super healthy produce items that are as expensive as they are tasty.

    Eat Right Montana suggests the following tips for stretching the produce dollar:

    Dried Beans, Peas and Lentils

  • Pauline and Elvin DeHart of Supply celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary. They were married March 25, 1949, in High Point. The couple moved to Supply more than 25 years ago when Elvin retired from Western Electric.

  • Contrary to our usual pattern, my husband received a book and I began to read it. A tiny bit of literature written by Henri J.M. Nouwen, it’s title drew my attention: “Out of Solitude: Three Meditations on the Christian Life.” These meditations were first given as sermons at the United Church of Christ at Yale University.

    I had just returned from undergoing an outpatient procedure with the lovely command to spend the remainder of the day resting. Resting! What a nice message and delightful gift, a treat that I would otherwise guiltily embrace.

  • CALABASH—Fried fish is already a buzzword in the seafood capital, but during Lent it takes on renewed meaning at Calabash VFW Post 7288.

    On Friday, Feb. 27, the post once again started cooking up its annual Friday-night fish fries that continue until April 10.

    “Welcome to our madhouse,” joked Trish McCormick as she and her husband, Bill, and other VFW volunteers toiled in the kitchen at one of the weekly Lenten fish fries March 6.

  • Get ready to be entranced by laser shows this weekend in Ingram Planetarium’s Sky Theater this Friday and Saturday night in Sunset Beach.

    The shows are among the planetarium’s lineup of heavenly astronomy and science programs for all ages in its 85-seat theater. All shows are one hour or less. Laser shows are staged the third Friday and Saturday of the month.

    The planetarium’s laser projection system, unveiled last November, consists of full-color animation lights choreographed to music and a new 5.1 surround-sound system.

  • Do you instinctively grab the phone to order Chinese food every time you crave something different? If you do, why not try a Chinese cook-in instead of take-out? Homemade Chinese food is a lot easier to prepare than you might think.

    You don’t have to have a lot of special cookware or buy fancy ingredients to prepare some great Chinese food. Just use items you already have in your pantry. You don’t need to own a wok to cook your own Chinese food, just use any frying pan (deeper the better). If you do own a wok, all the better.

    Avoid those extra shopping trips

  • In case you haven’t noticed, it gets pretty hot in southeastern North Carolina in the summer. Add the humidity, lots of poorly drained soils and, sometimes, excessive rainfall, and you have a recipe for disaster for many of the plants we like to grow, such as azalea, camellia, gardenia and Japanese hollies.

    Take a cue from our old buddy “Poor Richard” who was fond of saying “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.”

  • I have been having a number of clients calling about weed control in their landscape. Some products come with a hefty price tag to them, and people are always looking for a bargain or for a cheaper alternative.

    I just had a client call me about the use of Image to control nutsedge and wild onions in her lawn. She was advised to use Image or 2,4-D. Follow along with what could happen if you don’t read the label.

  • With the number of new housing developments and new folks to this area, it is time to do a series on making the backyard and wooded areas attractive to wildlife. The first couple of articles will look at ways to invite birds to your area.

  • Debra J. Long of Shallotte and Jared Cox of Ash were married Oct. 25, 2008, at Caldonia Golf and Fish Club, with the Rev. Phil Norris officiating.

    The bride is the daughter of Grady and Peggy Long of Shallotte.

    The groom is the son of Tom and Pam Anello of Ash.

    The bride was given in marriage and escorted by her father.

    The bride wore a white strapless gown with a ballgown skirt and semi-cathedral train, rouched bustline with a semi-sweetheart neckline.Cameo designs with sequins and bugle beads adorned the fitted bodice, skirt and train.

  • Announcement is made of the upcoming marriage of Maria Daniels and Marvin Porter of Longwood. The bride-elect is the daughter of William and Ida Moody of Longwood. The prospective groom is the son of Jeanette and Ben Brand. An April 4 wedding is planned in Longwood, with the Rev. M.C. Herring officiating.

  • Announcement is made of the forthcoming marriage of Ashley Lauster and Justin Swaim, both of Supply. The bride-elect is the daughter of Gail Lauster of Sunset Beach and Frederick Lauster Jr. of Pine Island, N.Y. The prospective groom is the son of Marty and Kevin Middleton of Pleasant Garden, N.Y., and Charles and Susan Swaim of Trinity. A May 9 wedding is planned on Holden Beach.

  • Eugene and Joyce Elliott of Supply celebrated 50 years of marriage March 15. They were married in 1959 at Cerro Gordo Baptist Church. They now have a large family including three daughters, Kipp Snell, Shannon Patterson and Stephanie Lindsey; a son, Travis Elliott; 10 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

  • Jason and Catelyn Miller are the parents of a son, Jayson Derek Miller, born at 11:59 p.m. Feb. 3 at New Hanover Regional Medical Center.

    He weighed 8 pounds, 5 ounces and measured 21 inches long.

    Maternal grandmother is Debbie Schaefer of Calabash.

    Paternal grandparents are Randy and Debbie Mitchum of Supply.

    Great-grandparents are David and Karen Coon of Ocean Isle Beach, Joy and Betty Richardson of Ocean Isle Beach and Ron and Rosie Hallatt of Bedford, Ind.

  • As soon as I hear the name Ezekiel, I begin to hum, keeping the sound safely in my head, of course. But sometimes I can’t help it. Sometimes, it escapes out loud into the air.

    “Them bones, them bones, them dry bones, them bones, them bones, them dry bones, them bones, them bones, them dry bones, now hear the word of the Lord.”

    It was my first lesson in anatomy. I could visualize my ankle bone connected to my shin bone, my shin bone to my thigh bone, my thigh bone connected to my hip bone, and onward throughout the skeletal system of my body.

  • Kitten season has begun at Cat Tails. Maxine and Missy are 8-week-old sisters who would love to find great new homes where they can romp and play. To see them, call Cat Tails at 253-1375 or visit its Web site at www.cattails.org. You can visit Maxine and Missy, as well as all the other cats and kittens available for adoption, at Cat Tails in the Corner Stone center at 6622 Beach Drive in Ocean Isle Beach. Visiting hours are 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Wednesdays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays and 1-3 p.m. Sundays. Other hours are by appointment. Cat Tails is also desperate for volunteers.

  • There’s a slob and a neat freak sharing an apartment, a loudmouth cop and a disastrous double-date with a couple of upstairs neighbors, but the Brunswick Little Theatre’s latest production of “The Odd Couple” is not what you’d expect.

    This year, longtime BLT member Thom Clemmons decided to direct playwright Neil Simon’s female version of the popular play, which Simon rewrote for a female cast in 1985.

  • One of my daughters relayed a story to me with the comment it might be a good column. The tale involved a supermarket bagger who was also living with Down’s syndrome.

    Scoffers might quickly race to Snopes to check out its veracity. Cynics might well sneer at its simplicity. Fable, fiction or fact everyone can glean value from most narratives, no matter how accurate the details might be.

    This presentation about Johnny, the supermarket bagger in Akron, Ohio, fits the description of valued and valuable sketches.