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Features

  • Jennifer Lynn Johnson of Leland and Blaine Tucker Cully of Ocean Isle Beach were married Dec. 13 at Jennies Branch Baptist Church in Shallotte.

    The Rev. David Helms officiated.

    The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs Keith Johnson of Fayetteville and the granddaughter of Louise Rochetti of Linden and the late Abraham Rocchetti; Frances Melvin of Erwin and Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Johnson of Fayetteville.

  • As you plan your vegetable garden, you will choose what vegetables you wish to grow and you should also choose which plants would attract beneficial insects.

    A garden insectary is a small garden plot of flowering plants designed to attract and harbor beneficial insects. These “good insects” prey on many common garden insect pests and offer the gardener a safer, natural alternative to pesticides.

  • Mr. and Mrs. James E. Lewis of Shallotte announce the marriage of their daughter, Jennifer Lynn, to Mr. Johnathan Charles Chastain, Dec. 20, 2008 at St. Luke Lutheran Church, with the Rev. Henry B. Rehder officating the renewal of vows.

    The couple’s original wedding ceremony took place Dec. 21, 2007, before the groom’s second deployment to Iraq.

    The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Chastain of Hayden, Ala., and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Emmitt Chastain and Mrs. and Mrs. Edsell Vaughn.

  • My grandson is a member of the redoing club. Apparently, his grades are indicative of a certain degree of disinterest. Perhaps he doesn’t understand the adage that haste makes waste. It might be he is communicating his boredom with some subjects.

    Whatever the cause, the “cure”—one is committed not to consider it punishment—is to “re-do.” He must address the subject matter at hand until he gets it completely correct. I neglected to ask if his grade would be calculated on the first, last, or any in-between attempt!

  • SUPPLY—Local officials, celebrities, business leaders and the defending champion have signed on to cut a rug this year for the second annual “Dancing with the Brunswick County Stars” to benefit the Brunswick Community College Foundation.

    Thursday morning, organizers gathered at BCC’s Odell Williamson Auditorium to announce the participants in this year’s event, scheduled for Aug. 28 at Sea Trail Resort and Convention Center in Sunset Beach.

  •  STAFF PHOTO BY LAURA LEWIS

     

    Tabby Tabitha

  • Once again, it’s time to fire up those outdoor grills and enjoy some great home-grilled cuisine.

    Grilling has become unbelievably popular, but I have found, though, there is a misconception concerning outdoor cooking. Most everyone assumes if you’re cooking outside, then you’re barbecuing. Not so.

    When barbecuing, one must utilize an indirect heat source that produces smoke or heat to cook the meat. This process usually takes more time than other types of cooking, depending upon the type and size of meat.

  • You won’t have a chance at an Oscar, but screening plants are important for privacy, windbreaks and just forming property boundaries.

    For a long time now, if anyone asked, “What should I plant for a screen?” the answer was often, “Leyland cypress.”

  • Arbor Day observances can be tricky. There is the date set aside for the national Arbor Day celebration, in addition to many other observances across the country occurring at different times. Here is a brief history of how Arbor Day got started:

    J. Sterling Morton and his wife moved into the Nebraska Territory in 1854 from Detroit. He and his wife were lovers of nature and the home they established in Nebraska was quickly planted with trees, shrubs and flowers.

  • “O, my people! I will put my spirit in you that you may live, and I will settle you upon your land; thus you shall know that I am the Lord. I have promised and I will do it, says the Lord.”

    When I read these words from the prophet Ezekiel, I am consoled beyond belief. At first blush any of us might say this message is for the house of Israel, the chosen people of the Hebrew Scriptures. What has this to do with us? What has it to do with Lent?

  • Work by renowned raku artist Charles Chrisco is being featured through April 29 at Sunset River Marketplace gallery in Calabash.

    The art of raku is said to have originated in 16th-century Japan by a Korean immigrant who had settled in Kyoto and married a Japanese woman.

    Translated, raku means “great happiness,” a title bestowed on the early wares by the reigning ruler of Japan.

    Clay artist Chrisco knows the pleasures of raku.

  • “To Kill A Mockingbird,” Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel celebrating its 50th year of publication, was brought to the screen in 1962 in an Academy Award-winning adaptation and later adapted for stage.

    More than 35 years old, Christopher Sergel’s stage adaptation continues to delight and compel audiences worldwide.

    Thursday night, March 26, Montana Repertory Theatre will bring “To Kill A Mockingbird” to life at 7:30 p.m. in Odell Williamson Auditorium at Brunswick Community College.

  • Spaetzle is a German noodle or pasta made by pushing a batter of flour, milk, eggs and salt through a special spaetzle maker or colander into boiling liquid—either water or chicken or beef broth—and then served as a dumpling with meats and stews.

  • Warm weather is here and summer will soon be approaching. In anticipation of warm fun, many local organizations are now accepting registrations for summer camps.

    Looking for something for your kids to do when school gets out? Check out the list below to see what opportunities are available.

    Research indicates students experience the “Summer Slide” in the months when school is not in session.

  • I’ve never been one of those people who got overly excited about native plants. We do have some wonderful natives, but some of our southern favorites like evergreen azaleas, camellias, gardenias and crape myrtle have all been introduced from other parts of the world.

  • Survival techniques for certain plants provide that they be dormant during harsh weather and they grow and thrive during good weather. Problems arise when the weather becomes similar to springtime conditions and the plants respond by initiating new shoots, buds, leaves, flowers, etc.

  • Continuing with the discussion of how to invite birds to your home, the first thing to examine is the concept of living screens.

    Living Screens

    Hedges and rows of trees screen off unpleasant views and reduce noise from highways. In crowded neighborhoods, they offer privacy for your backyard activities and they attract birds to your place year after year. Juniper, autumn-olive, dogwood, cotoneaster, or a combination of these, make good living screens.

    Open Areas

  • As food budgets tighten, you often hear people claim, “it’s more expensive to eat healthy.” Smart shoppers know to look for fresh fruits and vegetables in season and on sale. They also know there are some super healthy produce items that are as expensive as they are tasty.

    Eat Right Montana suggests the following tips for stretching the produce dollar:

    Dried Beans, Peas and Lentils

  • Pauline and Elvin DeHart of Supply celebrate their 60th wedding anniversary. They were married March 25, 1949, in High Point. The couple moved to Supply more than 25 years ago when Elvin retired from Western Electric.

  • Contrary to our usual pattern, my husband received a book and I began to read it. A tiny bit of literature written by Henri J.M. Nouwen, it’s title drew my attention: “Out of Solitude: Three Meditations on the Christian Life.” These meditations were first given as sermons at the United Church of Christ at Yale University.

    I had just returned from undergoing an outpatient procedure with the lovely command to spend the remainder of the day resting. Resting! What a nice message and delightful gift, a treat that I would otherwise guiltily embrace.