.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • The song may strike us as sentimental, but the idea—no, the ideal—is right on target! What our world needs now, and has always needed, is love, sweet love. It does not call for a saccharine substitute that provides the sweetness artificially, but the genuine goods. We need a love that challenges as profoundly as it comforts; that disturbs and demands as deeply as it delights. To love is not easy, but it is worthwhile.

  • Contemporary gospel group Big Daddy Weave is coming to Shallotte this Saturday, April 18, when it performs in concert at 7:30 p.m. at Highest Praise Worship Center, 19 Red Bug Road.

    Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 the day of the show.

    Advance tickets may be purchased via itickets.com or at Highest Praise Worship Center.

    Big Daddy Weave entered the studio for the fifth time in their decade-long career with a singular mission—to create a collection of songs that might somehow communicate the word placed on their hearts to the hearts of those who hear it.

  • Princess (ID No. A003593) is a beautiful pastel calico with a sweet disposition. The shelter’s adoption fees for female cats and kittens are $55, which includes physical exam, feline leukemia/FIV (feline HIV) tests, rabies vaccination and spay surgery. Adoption fees for male cats and kittens are $35, which includes physical exam, feline leukemia/FIV test, rabies vaccination and neuter surgery. The shelter, at 429 Green Swamp Road (N.C. 211) in Supply, is open to the public for viewing animals and adoptions from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays.

  • My aunt and uncle were from Beaver Falls in western Pennsylvania, which is about 20 miles from Pittsburgh. We always enjoyed going there, especially when Aunt Jeanne was going to have some “halushki.”

  • Spring is our most colorful time of year in the garden. Camellias are finishing up just in time to let flowering dogwoods and azaleas take center stage.

    In the midst of all of this beauty, here are a few of my garden observations about all of the beauty and some potential disease problems.

  • Spring has arrived and people are in a hurry to spruce up their yards. There are a few things that need more time to pass before doing. Hopefully, the pine pollen problem will be ending as you read this.

  • Jennifer Lynn Johnson of Leland and Blaine Tucker Cully of Ocean Isle Beach were married Dec. 13 at Jennies Branch Baptist Church in Shallotte.

    The Rev. David Helms officiated.

    The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs Keith Johnson of Fayetteville and the granddaughter of Louise Rochetti of Linden and the late Abraham Rocchetti; Frances Melvin of Erwin and Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Johnson of Fayetteville.

  • As you plan your vegetable garden, you will choose what vegetables you wish to grow and you should also choose which plants would attract beneficial insects.

    A garden insectary is a small garden plot of flowering plants designed to attract and harbor beneficial insects. These “good insects” prey on many common garden insect pests and offer the gardener a safer, natural alternative to pesticides.

  • Mr. and Mrs. James E. Lewis of Shallotte announce the marriage of their daughter, Jennifer Lynn, to Mr. Johnathan Charles Chastain, Dec. 20, 2008 at St. Luke Lutheran Church, with the Rev. Henry B. Rehder officating the renewal of vows.

    The couple’s original wedding ceremony took place Dec. 21, 2007, before the groom’s second deployment to Iraq.

    The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Chastain of Hayden, Ala., and the grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Emmitt Chastain and Mrs. and Mrs. Edsell Vaughn.

  • My grandson is a member of the redoing club. Apparently, his grades are indicative of a certain degree of disinterest. Perhaps he doesn’t understand the adage that haste makes waste. It might be he is communicating his boredom with some subjects.

    Whatever the cause, the “cure”—one is committed not to consider it punishment—is to “re-do.” He must address the subject matter at hand until he gets it completely correct. I neglected to ask if his grade would be calculated on the first, last, or any in-between attempt!

  • SUPPLY—Local officials, celebrities, business leaders and the defending champion have signed on to cut a rug this year for the second annual “Dancing with the Brunswick County Stars” to benefit the Brunswick Community College Foundation.

    Thursday morning, organizers gathered at BCC’s Odell Williamson Auditorium to announce the participants in this year’s event, scheduled for Aug. 28 at Sea Trail Resort and Convention Center in Sunset Beach.

  •  STAFF PHOTO BY LAURA LEWIS

     

    Tabby Tabitha

  • Once again, it’s time to fire up those outdoor grills and enjoy some great home-grilled cuisine.

    Grilling has become unbelievably popular, but I have found, though, there is a misconception concerning outdoor cooking. Most everyone assumes if you’re cooking outside, then you’re barbecuing. Not so.

    When barbecuing, one must utilize an indirect heat source that produces smoke or heat to cook the meat. This process usually takes more time than other types of cooking, depending upon the type and size of meat.

  • You won’t have a chance at an Oscar, but screening plants are important for privacy, windbreaks and just forming property boundaries.

    For a long time now, if anyone asked, “What should I plant for a screen?” the answer was often, “Leyland cypress.”

  • Arbor Day observances can be tricky. There is the date set aside for the national Arbor Day celebration, in addition to many other observances across the country occurring at different times. Here is a brief history of how Arbor Day got started:

    J. Sterling Morton and his wife moved into the Nebraska Territory in 1854 from Detroit. He and his wife were lovers of nature and the home they established in Nebraska was quickly planted with trees, shrubs and flowers.

  • “O, my people! I will put my spirit in you that you may live, and I will settle you upon your land; thus you shall know that I am the Lord. I have promised and I will do it, says the Lord.”

    When I read these words from the prophet Ezekiel, I am consoled beyond belief. At first blush any of us might say this message is for the house of Israel, the chosen people of the Hebrew Scriptures. What has this to do with us? What has it to do with Lent?

  • Work by renowned raku artist Charles Chrisco is being featured through April 29 at Sunset River Marketplace gallery in Calabash.

    The art of raku is said to have originated in 16th-century Japan by a Korean immigrant who had settled in Kyoto and married a Japanese woman.

    Translated, raku means “great happiness,” a title bestowed on the early wares by the reigning ruler of Japan.

    Clay artist Chrisco knows the pleasures of raku.

  • “To Kill A Mockingbird,” Harper Lee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel celebrating its 50th year of publication, was brought to the screen in 1962 in an Academy Award-winning adaptation and later adapted for stage.

    More than 35 years old, Christopher Sergel’s stage adaptation continues to delight and compel audiences worldwide.

    Thursday night, March 26, Montana Repertory Theatre will bring “To Kill A Mockingbird” to life at 7:30 p.m. in Odell Williamson Auditorium at Brunswick Community College.

  • Spaetzle is a German noodle or pasta made by pushing a batter of flour, milk, eggs and salt through a special spaetzle maker or colander into boiling liquid—either water or chicken or beef broth—and then served as a dumpling with meats and stews.

  • Warm weather is here and summer will soon be approaching. In anticipation of warm fun, many local organizations are now accepting registrations for summer camps.

    Looking for something for your kids to do when school gets out? Check out the list below to see what opportunities are available.

    Research indicates students experience the “Summer Slide” in the months when school is not in session.