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Features

  • The most important decision you make for your pet
    Pet owners and veterinarians are always looking for that one tip, trick or advancement that will help pets live longer, healthier lives. Me, too. And I found it.
    The most important decision you make each day for your pet is what you feed it. Same goes for us. Of all the variables in life we can control, diet and nutrition have the greatest influence on health. Want your pet to live longer? Feed it well. You want to be functional well into your eighties? Start with how you’re fueling your body.

  •  OCEAN ISLE BEACH—Operation Marry Me Military is in full action mode as the big day draws near.

    The new nonprofit started by Oak Island’s Alecia Geddings is off to a grand start for its inaugural year. The 10-year goal is to marry 100 active military personnel on Veterans Day across the state.

    This year Brunswick County is home to two beach weddings. Event planner Brittany Adams of Brittany Adams O’Neil Events of Ocean Isle Beach and Michelle Rose are coordinating the Operation Marry Me Military event for southern Brunswick County.

  • Fall is upon us, and temperatures and leaves are falling. Even a satellite fell, because gravity affects us all. Some satellites can get a gravity whip and instead of coming back to earth, the gravity whip sends it flying while saving fuel. Thanks, gravity.
    Voyager 1 and 2 are such satellites, and with a little practice, you can tell where both objects are just by looking for the constellations with the moving parts.

  •   BRUNSWICK COUNTY—She has been growing collard greens for more than 30 years, but never has she grown them as tall as this year.

    Velma Williams planted collard greens in her garden last spring, just like she does every year. Only this year, they never seemed to stop growing.

    Last week Williams measured them. The tallest one in her garden is 56 inches in height.

  • CALABASH—It’s a corner nook, just waiting for browsers to come and discover delights that await within.

    One of them is All About the Carolinas, a shop tucked away inside the Low Country Stores complex where browsers can find an array of items made in the Carolinas.

    Shop owner Sally Pennington says she’s trying to feature items made exclusively in North or South Carolina.

    “I thought it would be a real challenge to find things, but no,” says Pennington, tending to gift baskets behind the counter of her boutique.

  • Filmmakers are scheduled to be in Sunset Beach this week.

    Susan Silk, marketing coordinator for the Museum of Coastal Carolina and Ingram Planetarium, said a film company is supposed to be at the planetarium in Sunset Beach this Wednesday, Sept. 28.

    Hallmark Hall of Fame is producing a made-for-TV movie to air via ABC-TV in January, according to Silk.

  • CALABASH—It’s a corner nook, just waiting for browsers to come and discover delights that await within.

    One of them is All About the Carolinas, a shop tucked away inside the Low Country Stores complex where browsers can find an array of items made in the Carolinas.

    Shop owner Sally Pennington says she’s trying to feature items made exclusively in North or South Carolina.

    “I thought it would be a real challenge to find things, but no,” says Pennington, tending to gift baskets behind the counter of her boutique.

  • CALABASH—Wherever Mary Keefe goes, Buddy the cat often goes. If he feels like it.

    It’s been this way for the past eight-and-a-half years, when Keefe, owner of the Yardbird Emporium in the Low Country Stores complex, helped rescue Buddy and his two kitten siblings from under the store’s porch at 10138 Beach Drive.

    Mary took Mini, one of Buddy’s sisters, home to live with her. The proprietor of the former Martelle’s Flag Store took the other feline sister, Miss Kitty.

  • Ten years later, Americans who vowed never to forget Sept. 11, 2001, have kept their promise.

    Ten years ago, the country came to a halt and American lives changed forever as terrorist-directed planes crashed into the World Trade Center Twin Towers in New York, the Pentagon in Arlington, Va., and a rural field near Shanksville, Pa.

    Nearly 3,000 lives were lost that day, including 343 New York City Fire Department firefighters, 60 New York City and Port Authority officers, and eight emergency medical technicians and paramedics.

  • Gwen Grady couldn’t believe the cheerful patient she had met at Brunswick Universal Healthcare was more than a century old.

    That’s because Mae Smicklas, who turns 102 on Sept. 26, is youthful for her age.

    Grady, activity director at the Bolivia facility, recently met Smicklas when the centenarian was brought there for recovery after a recent fall.

    “I was just amazed at how sharp she is,” said Grady, recalling how Smicklas said, “No, I don’t need any reminders” about taking her medicine.

  • On a peaceful summer afternoon—so peaceful you could almost hear the Shallotte River ripple—World War II veteran Hector McNeill relaxed in one of the rocking chairs on his front porch overlooking the world at Shallotte Point.

    “My father was raised here,” said the Whiteville resident, who also owns a couple of historic houses at Shallotte Point, the historic, scenic convergence of the Shallotte River and Intracoastal Waterway three miles south of Shallotte.

  • With the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11 approaching, metal artist David McCune was inspired to create something to remind Americans never to forget.

  • Local author R.D. Lumpkin will be at Silver Coast Winery signing his new book, “Patriots Among Us: Never Forget,” from 2-4 p.m. Aug. 13.

  • SUNSET BEACH—Late last year, the old Sunset Beach pontoon bridge was officially shut down to make way for a taller, more deluxe Intracoastal Waterway bridge that wouldn’t break down or tie up traffic at the most inopportune times.

    The half-century-old span had done its time and it, along with its six human operators, was finally retired.

  • BOLIVIA—Adorable orphans and pickpockets speakin’ and singin’ cockney-like have been raising the rehearsal-hall rafters of Brunswick Community College of late.

    Ranging in age from 3 to 13, the young troupers are a perfect fit for Brunswick Little Theatre’s upcoming performances of the hit musical “Oliver!”, which will be presented July 29, 30 and 31 and Aug. 5-7 in Odell Williamson Auditorium on the BCC campus in Bolivia.

  • SUNSET BEACH—Three months ago, Callie the dog was homeless and suffering from heartworm at Brunswick County Animal Shelter.

    “We pulled Callie out of the Brunswick County Animal Shelter, put her in our foster program and worked with her until the Pernos decided to adopt her,” said Cheri McLain, founder of Rescue Animals Community Effort, a local nonprofit animal advocacy group hoping to eventually privatize the shelter on Green Swamp Road.

  • It was a night for mingling and sampling the wares as A Taste of Brunswick Plantation took place Sunday night.

    For the cost of an admission ticket to benefit the new Brunswick Hospice Care Center, residents turned out en masse to enjoy food samples from the community’s new recipe book bearing the same title as the event.

    The tickets entitled each attendee to food tickets that could be used to sample assorted dishes showcased in the recipe collection, “A Taste of Brunswick Plantation.”

  • In the southeast at 10 p.m., a giant of a constellation depicts a large man holding a snake. The man in the sky holding a snake is Ophiuchus.