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Features

  • SUPPLY—Theresa Tese had been praying for guidance, asking for something she could do to help others when inspiration struck.

    Ensconced in her Long Island living room a couple of winters ago, Tese looked down at her cozy new Christmas slippers and began to think about people whose feet might not be as warm that night.

    “It just was in my heart, that the homeless really need this,” she said. “They go through their socks, they wear them out, in one week. It’s always a renewable need.”

  • For members of a small gallery, some Franklin Square Gallery artists won big at the statewide watercolor show in Greenville and several other competitions.

    Six artists from this Southport cooperative gallery had their work accepted to this prestigious juried show and five won major prizes. Others won awards in Beaufort, Myrtle Beach, S.C., and locally.

  • The winners in the 14th annual Arts by the Shore, hosted by Oak Island Art Guild and Oak Island Parks and Recreation, have been announced.

    Jane Staszak, an award-winning artist and judge from South Carolina, was the juror.

    Best of Show

    “Thunderhead” by Dick Staat.

    Two-Dimensional

    Oil

    First place: “Old Wilmington Beauty” by Ann Lees.

    Second place: “Morning Rush” by Phil Meade.

    Third place: “Paint Job” by Ortrud Tyler.

    Acrylics

  • Thanksgiving dinner usually revolves around a glorious, bronzed, succulent roast turkey. This is actually one of the easiest parts of the meal.

    Plan on about 1-1/2 pounds of turkey for each person. You can buy a frozen turkey and thaw it ahead of time, cook your turkey still frozen (see below) or order a fresh bird. With a frozen bird, you have to plan ahead to thaw it. It takes at least 24 hours in the refrigerator for every 5 pounds of turkey, so a 20-pound bird will take 4-5 days to thaw.

    Brining the Turkey

  • Obviously, I have just returned from an intense couple of hours entrenched in the anxieties, terrors and corruption of 1928 Los Angeles in the film, ‘Changeling.’

    From the onset, I was immersed in the story of the abduction of Walter Collins and the ceaseless battle waged by his mother, Christine, as she fought to learn of her son’s whereabouts.

  •  BY LAURA LEWIS

    SUPPLY—Teams competing in “Are You Smarter Than a Village Schooler?” on Saturday night had to know some stuff.

    They needed to know the three most important nutrients for plant growth. They were asked how many quarters are in $3.50, what a six-sided figure is called and what is the longest river in the world, among dozens of other things.

  • As we celebrate this Veterans Day, many names come to mind of people we know in Brunswick County that served their country with great honor.

    Some names are well known, and other names are less known. Nonetheless, they were heros. Many residents of Brunswick County are familiar with the name of Odell Williamson.

    Odell was a veteran and served as an Army pilot during World War II assigned to the 30th Division.

  • The cooler weather of autumn may not have completely shut our warm-season grasses down, but mowing is probably a moot point for most of us now. While you may be enjoying the lawn care break, you can do yourself lots of good in the ongoing battle on lawn weeds by striking early.

    Applied to centipede, St. Augustine and Bermuda lawns, atrazine will control some of the existing weeds and keep lots of other winter weeds from showing up.

    You may say, “Heck, I don’t see any weeds out there.” You may be right, but look closely.

  • If you haven’t seen the colorful fall foliage, then walk outside and take a look. Your eyes are in for a wonderful treat.

    Our botanical garden in Bolivia is peaking with many bright hues of yellow, red, orange and purple. I often hear we do not have any color change in southeastern North Carolina, but I beg to differ. There are a number of plants showing off right now, but hurry, it will not last.

    If you like what you see and want to add more color in your landscape, then jot down the names of the plants you like and plant them this fall.

  • For me, the word library conjures up images of cold, stone buildings. I can still smell the musty odor that lingered in the air, exciting the imagination and exacerbating an air of literary mystery.

    Order was paramount in that place. Books dared not venture from their Dewey Decimal System placement and readers dared not return them to a spot that differed from their original place.

  • GRISSETTOWN—All things Italian will be celebrated this Saturday at Silver Coast Winery, which is staging its annual Festa Italia 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

    The event kicks off with master of ceremonies Dave “The Bopper” Overby warming up the crowd with Italian songs.

    At noon, Larry Tanelli and the Paisans will perform until 3 p.m., bringing their renowned tribute to Louis Prima.

    Also at noon, the Carolinas Italian American Organization (CIAO) will be on hand to organize Festa Italia’s annual bocce tournament, which is open to everyone.

  • STAFF REPORT 

    GRISSETTOWN—All things Italian will be celebrated this Saturday at Silver Coast Winery, which is staging its annual Festa Italia 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

    The event kicks off with master of ceremonies Dave “The Bopper” Overby warming up the crowd with Italian songs.

    At noon, Larry Tanelli and the Paisans will perform until 3 p.m., bringing their renowned tribute to Louis Prima.

  •  Beagle Bailey

  • Ask anyone about salt and they’ll tell you it’s bad for you. Well, they’re wrong. Salt is not bad for you. Your body needs it to function properly.

    What’s bad for you is excessive salt, or actually, the sodium part of salt.

    Americans consume an estimated 4,000-4,500 mg of salt a day. We only need 500 mg a day, and it’s recommended we get no more than 2,400 mg a day—about the amount in one teaspoon of salt.

  • Those of you who keep up with my ramblings via this great newspaper, radio or television, know I have a bit of Japanese maple mania. With more than 500 selections, it is easy to go a little Acer palmatum nutty.

    Even though my garden is pretty small, I’ve figured out a way to work in seven different Japanese maples—Bloodgood, Emperor I, Crimson Queen, Tamukeyama, Orangeola, Seiryu and Sango Kaku. If my Emerald Pagoda Japanese Snowbell continues to disappoint, there may be some extra space opening up.

  • There has always been a concern for runoff into our waterways. Water runoff may carry pollutants that can wreak havoc in our sensitive environmental estuaries and marshes.

    Dislodged particles of soil and water soluble materials, whether they are nutrients or other chemicals, can move across the surface of even gentle slopes and be deposited into ditches or canals ultimately ending up in our water ways. Buffer strips help to filter out most pollutants and can trap sediment or other particles from entering our streams.

  • If you haven’t purchased your daffodil bulbs for next year, you better hurry right now to the garden center to pick out some beauties for next year’s landscape.

    Daffodils are among the easiest, most affordable and pest-free perennials available. One requirement is daffodils need to be vernalized; that is, they need both the cold and the warmth to bloom. Daffodils require a short chill period as opposed to tulips, which require a longer chill period. Our winters are cool enough for daffodils, as we can see as they continue to come back year after year.

  • BY LAURA LEWIS

    STAFF WRITER

    HICKMANS CROSSROADS—Watching her dog, Margaret, snoozing on the sunporch last January ignited Marsha Tennant’s creative spark.

  • BY SARAH SHEW WILSON

    STAFF WRITER

    She still remembers growing up in rural Brunswick County, raising a family and working hard for everything she had.

    And Bessie Hewett has more memories than most, considering she is possibly the county’s oldest living resident.

    The Supply native will celebrate her 108th birthday this month surrounded by generations of offspring, and she will even garner a mention on an upcoming broadcast of NBC’s “Today” show, along with other centenarians from across the country.

  • STAFF REPORT

    A group of musicians and friends from the Ash area recently formed a rock band “Blackwater Outlaws” and will perform Nov. 8 at Big Woods ATV Park in Longwood.

    The band members include Jason Coveyou, 28, of Ash on guitar and vocals; Myron Norris, 27, of Ash, on guitar and vocals; Travis Norris, 32, of Ash, on vocals; William Norris, 53, of Ash, on bass guitar and vocals; and Butch Register, 51, on drums.