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Features

  • BY SARAH SHEW WILSON

    STAFF WRITER

    She still remembers growing up in rural Brunswick County, raising a family and working hard for everything she had.

    And Bessie Hewett has more memories than most, considering she is possibly the county’s oldest living resident.

    The Supply native will celebrate her 108th birthday this month surrounded by generations of offspring, and she will even garner a mention on an upcoming broadcast of NBC’s “Today” show, along with other centenarians from across the country.

  • STAFF REPORT

    A group of musicians and friends from the Ash area recently formed a rock band “Blackwater Outlaws” and will perform Nov. 8 at Big Woods ATV Park in Longwood.

    The band members include Jason Coveyou, 28, of Ash on guitar and vocals; Myron Norris, 27, of Ash, on guitar and vocals; Travis Norris, 32, of Ash, on vocals; William Norris, 53, of Ash, on bass guitar and vocals; and Butch Register, 51, on drums.

  • By Elsa Bonstein

    Beacon Correspondent

    When most boys were playing baseball and going to Boy Scout meetings, Chuck Fleming of Sunset Beach was serving in the Navy. He enlisted on Nov. 12, 1947, at the age of 15. By the time he was 16, Fleming was an air traffic controller.

    Today, these boys-turned-soldiers are called “Young Warriors” and are part of an organization called Veterans of Underage Military Service (VUMS). All of the members of VUMS were underage when they served in the U.S. military. Some were as young as 12 or 13 years old.

  • By Elsa Bonstein

    Beacon Correspondent

    Membership in Veterans of Underage Military Service (VUMS) requires a person to have served in the U.S. military while under the age of 17.

    World War II Merchant Marine vets need to be younger than 16, and women vets of World War II need to have served while under the age of 20.

  • Little Sammy was found as a stray in need of a home right away. He weighs 17 pounds, is housebroken, loves to play with his people and toys, but hates the cold and wet outdoors. He’s been neutered, is up-to-date on his shots, and is in a foster home due to the weather. Please call to make an appointment to see Sammy at Paws Place. Paws Place Animal Rescue is a no-kill, nonprofit domestic animal rescue facility that provides sanctuary for unadoptable dogs and seeks loving homes for those that are. Its kennels are open 9 a.m. to noon daily.

  • My wife and I attended a Halloween dinner years ago prepared by my good friend, Jim Stanley, from Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, who continued this tradition for his kids and family until his untimely passing a short time ago.

    Jim explained it’s “not really about the food as much as it is about the atmosphere you create and the presentation of the dishes and the implication of what they might be.”

  • As the flowering season for Encore azaleas winds down, it’s time for a performance update.

    I’m in the process of adding all 23 selections to my own garden, but I’m only half way there. The good folks at Flowerwood Nursery in Alabama, who developed the Encore line, were kind enough to donate two of each of the 23 varieties for us to plant in the Brunswick Botanical Garden in the metropolis of Bolivia.

  • Donald Adams of Oak Island has provided much of the information in this article. The Brunswick County Master Gardener volunteers are beholden to him for providing us with information on how to propagate, grow and enjoy the Confederate rose.

    The time is approaching when it is time to take cuttings. I have been asked by several people on when and how to take cuttings. Adams will provide us with that information.

  • Who says that we don’t have much color change for the fall in our area? Take time to enjoy the cool, fresh, fall days and look around and you will be amazed at how many plants offer a colorful palate of orange, yellow, red and purple hues.

  • Many people think of salt and sodium as being the same thing, but they are not.

    Table salt is 40 percent sodium and 60 percent chloride. It is the sodium portion of salt that is important to people concerned about high blood pressure.

  • If I hear the word change one more time, I think I am going to scream! On the political scene, it has been the buzz for months.

    Each candidate in turn, from national to local, has grabbed the word, held it tightly, and squeezed the life out of it.

    Each has questioned the ability of the other to promote change. Each has tested the validity of change itself. Each has threatened to explore change at the price of stability and pronounced change as the answer to all ills.

    On the cusp of electing a new president, change is electrifying the air.

  • Who’s in control?

    As the school year has started to rage on for me and my friends, it has become painfully obvious time keeps on turning.

    There is always a next deadline, a next sports practice, and rarely is there ever a night with no homework.

    It is no longer about deciding what do to with one’s free time. Instead, life becomes about what subject should be studied first, and when one will actually be able to get some sleep.

  • Starting life on a farm in Ash, where her parents worked hard for everything they had, Esther Myles knows the importance of perseverance.

    She’s gone from farm life to motherhood, from business owner to teacher to world champion hairdresser and make-up artist, eventually founding the cosmetology department at Brunswick Community College.

    Myles says she wants to encourage people to follow their dreams, let faith guide them and not be afraid of hard work.

    That’s why, in 2002, she began writing a book to tell her story and inspire others.

  • Sunset River Marketplace, 10283 Beach Drive SW in Calabash, is sponsoring a Kaboo Jewelry Trunk Show on Friday, Nov. 7, and Saturday, Nov. 8. from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    The show will introduce Kaboo’s new copper collection and offer an opportunity to meet Kaboo jewelry designers Jill Hope and Judy Rickenbacker.

  • Lonnie is a 6-month-old, high-energy orange tabby who plays well with others and loves attention. He is at his best when there is another cat or two in the house. To see him, call Cat Tails at 253-1375 or visit their Web site at www.cattails.org. You can visit Lonnie, as well as all the other cats and kittens available for adoption, at Cat Tails in the Corner Stone center at 6622 Beach Drive in Ocean Isle Beach. Visiting hours are 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesdays, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturdays and 1-3 p.m. Sundays. Other hours are by appointment. Cat Tails is also desperate for volunteers.

  • Brunswick Arts Council, the nonprofit arts association of Brunswick County is gearing up for its fifth annual Evening of Miniature Masterpieces.

    The gala evening will be on Nov. 22 at Sunset River Marketplace art gallery in Calabash.

    The event is the Council’s sole fundraiser of the year. Proceeds will provide funding for scholarships, free concerts, literary events, reading programs, dramatic and musical theatre performances, educational programs, artist grants, art symposiums, youth programs, senior programs, in-school activities and more.

  • The Festival by the Sea is my chance to eat sinfully, at least one day a year.

    Elephant ears, funnel cakes and lemon shakeups! It has been years since I have eaten an elephant ear, but those were always my favorite. I usually get at least a lemon shakeup every year at the festival. And, if there is a vendor selling deep-fried candy bars, I may have to try one…though the call of the funnel cake is strong.

    How do you make Sloppy Joe’s on a stick? Oh, never mind, I probably don’t want to know!

  • Shorter days and cooler temperatures have finally arrived. We don’t have to mow as much because the grass is slowing down. Trees and shrubs are losing their leaves and getting prepared for the winter dormant period and sports fans are enjoying baseball’s grand finale—the World Series.

    Somewhere between watching the boys of October and trying to figure out the craziness that is the Bowl Championship Series, you need to give your irrigation system a bit of attention.

  • Fall is the time when the sun drops low in the sky and shadows grow long. Although the garden seems to be shutting down for the winter, it’s really time to prepare for next year’s garden by paying attention to garden sanitation and soil. The following is a list of tasks you might need to perform soon:

    Pest Control

  • Christmas roses, as well as Lenten roses, can bring blooms to our winter landscape. These perennials are hellebores, an old-fashioned plant enjoying renewed interest. They are not roses at all, but belong to the buttercup family. They thrive in alkaline soil but tolerate acidic soils as well. They should be planted in partly shaded to shady sites.

    There are several types of hellebores, but the two most common are H. niger and H. orientalis.