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Features

  • Southeastern native plants are ablaze with color in the fall. Colorful berries appear to delight the human eye and provide food for hungry birds. The leaves turn orange, red or gold as the weather turns cooler creating beauty throughout the wooded areas and hopefully in your own back yard.

  • Angela Thompson lets her faith guide her, and it has taken her from her hometown of Detroit to Shallotte, where she has practiced family medicine for the past eight years.

    And now it has led her to something she never expected—a career as a gospel songwriter and recording artist.

    “I’ve liked to sing all my life,” she said. “I really started writing and performing since I moved here.”

    Recruited in her residency by Dr. George Saunders, she moved to Shallotte in 2000.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • OAK ISLAND—Mariah Brazil was on the lookout for a special dog.

    Grieving over the death of her mother late last year, the Oak Island resident scanned the cages of homeless dogs at the Brunswick County animal shelter, searching for a special canine companion to help fill the void.

    It took a K-9 to come to her rescue.

    Brunswick County K-9 Sgt. Tommy Tolley was also at the shelter. He overheard Brazil tell a shelter employee she just hadn’t found the right dog yet.

  • Our waste disposal sites are filling up and landfills across the nation are being closed at an alarming rate.

    At least 20 percent of the solid waste placed in landfills consists of yard and garden wastes such as leaves and grass clippings. One step we can take toward solving our waste disposal problems is to make compost out of our lawn and garden wastes.

  • After four or five months of growing, many landscape beds are probably in need of a good weeding and edging. Most plantings would benefit from a late summer renovation. This would include hand pulling the annual weeds and grasses and spraying a contact herbicide on the tough perennial weeds and grasses, if you have any.

  • Our lawns have had a much better season than last year. Most areas have received a bit of natural irrigation and the warm temperatures have helped our grasses fill in and recover. Keep a good thing going as we slide toward fall by adding potassium and be prepared to knock large patch out before it kills parts of your lawn.

  • Maggie Stephens will start sixth grade in the fall, and she is already considering a career as a crime scene investigator.

    Like thousands of other students in Brunswick County, she is preparing for Aug. 25, the first day at her new school—Shallotte Middle.

    Maggie says math is her best subject, and after spending the summer in a school-age kids program at Tiny Tots Child Center near Shallotte, she’s ready for the challenges of middle school.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Last week’s article was about some of the issues people have brought up about the use of mulches in the landscape.

    I promised this week we would look at the benefits of mulching, but before we proceed, I want to let you read what our specialist from N.C. State provided to ease some of the concerns about the use of mulch and the presence of termites. Excerpt from Mike Waldvogel:

    The bottom line

  • Recently, we have received several calls on the Extension Master Gardener’s Hot Line concerning lack of blooms on various types of plants.

    Following are some possible reasons—sometimes, there are just no explanations:

    Shrubs and flowers that are supposed to bloom, but don’t often frustrate gardeners. Someone recently reported nothing in their yard would bloom and went on to name several species that normally flower well in this area.

  • South Carolina is the ‘Palmetto’ state in honor of the cabbage palm or sabal palmetto. This trunk-forming palm is native to coastal regions as far north as Bald Head Island, but it does pretty well all the way up to Onslow and Carteret counties in the ‘Tarheel’ state.

    The techniques necessary to successfully transplant a sabal palmetto are similar in some ways to what we try to do with typical trees and shrubs, but vastly different in others.

  • Landing on an aircraft carrier is like hitting a speed bump—a large speed bump! Nothing can prepare you for the experience and there are no words to describe it.

    A group of us were recently honored to fly out to the aircraft carrier Eisenhower, to stay overnight and observe flight operations. Although we knew about the trip a few months earlier, the Navy couldn’t give us details. I got the word a week before we departed our orders were being cut, we’d be flying to the Ike but they wouldn’t say where we were going.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

    5-7 p.m., First Friday Gallery Walk, downtown Southport. Refreshments, entertainment, horse-drawn carriage rides. Sponsored by Franklin Square Gallery, Ricky Evans Gallery, Lantana’s Gallery and Fine Gifts and Cape Fear Coppershop. For more information, call 457-1129 or 457-0957.

  • On the 15th of August in the auditorium of Odell,

    A crowd gathered ’round under quite a spell;

    Brunswick Little Theatre was getting amuse-ical,

    As the cast cast its magic in “Seussical: The Musical!”

    Theatergoers who missed opening weekend of Brunswick Little Theatre’s latest production celebrating Dr. Seuss have three more chances this weekend.

  • Whether you have a faithful sidekick or not, it’s time for the “Lawn Ranger” to get busy.

    During these hot times when grass is really growing, it’s important to saddle up that lawn mower often and keep the blades sharp. This month is also the right time to fertilize Bermuda, zoysia, and St. Augustine if you’re following N.C. State University’s recommendations—and who wouldn’t be?

  • It is time again for the annual soil sampling promotion.

    Now is an excellent time to take soil samples. Submitting samples now results in receiving your analysis in three to four weeks or less, rather than submitting in the winter, which will take 12-16 weeks minimum for results to be received.

  • Mulching is one of the most beneficial practices you can do in the landscape. Each year when I teach the Master Gardener class, I challenge them to come up with at least 20 things mulches do in the landscape that would be considered beneficial.

    Somehow, we always get the question about the use of certain types of mulch and the concern for the health and safety of pets and if there are any other concerns about using mulch around the base or foundation of a house.

  • “I love taking a piece of clay and creating something that will remind people of the Southport/Oak Island area,” said local potter Lynn Stanzlaus.

    The Oak Island resident is one of three featured artists at the New Members Show this month at Franklin Square Gallery, joining watercolorists William James and Prentiss Halladay.

    The scenery of Southport and the surrounding beaches and marshes has inspired local and regional artists, especially the three under the spotlight this month.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December