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Features

  • Here are some gardening tips for September.

    Landscaping

    Everyone wants to know the best time to move plants or to plant them. According to extension specialists, the best time is the fall season. Late September and October would be some of the best times for us in the coastal regions but there should still be some good times even in November and early December to plant shrubs and trees. You still have time to put in a fall garden for some of your cool season crops.

    Autumn color ideas

  • What’s eating the leaves on my plant? Hot Line volunteers hear the complaint many times during the growing season. Following is the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service’s answer to that question:

  • It has been more than four decades since a group of young men and women made their national television debut on The Andy Williams Show, in the fall of 1962.

    That group, The New Christy Minstrels, went on to win a Grammy for their debut recording, “Presenting The New Christy Minstrels.”

    Formed by Randy Sparks in 1961, the group had several Top 40 folk music hits, including “This Land Is Your Land,” “Green, Green,” “Today,” and “Ramblin’”. They are still singing and delighting fans, old and new.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing

    Art and craft classes at Cappuccino By The Sea, 3331 Holden Beach Road. Various days and times. For more information, call 842-3661.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Watch for the following problems. The hotline volunteers have received several requests on the following:

    Fall armyworms in turfgrass

    Fall armyworms have been present in turfgrass for the past week or so and it appears they are now in full gear.

    There are a variety of sizes present and larger armyworms are most damaging. They typically begin near the edge of a turf area and invade across the turf leaving serious damage behind.

  • Large patch is the disease we love to hate most in our lawns in late summer and fall. This fungus has been hanging out all summer waiting for thatch temperatures to drop to around 70 degrees. We should be there right now.

    Check closely for the active disease. If it’s getting started again, apply a fungicide immediately followed by another application in five to six weeks. Products containing triadimefon (Bayleton) work well.

  • Getting the garden soil tilled, fertilized and ready for planting of fall vegetables can be a rather tiresome job, especially with outside temperatures higher than 90 degrees. Undoubtedly, most people would find it more comfortable under an air conditioner, but maximum results from gardening efforts are not always achieved under the most ideal working conditions.

  • Seven years ago, the world tuned in to watch a sunny September morning in New York veer into horror as terrorists crashed hijacked American planes into the World Trade Center towers.

    Sept. 11, 2001, is carved in minds and history, the kind of event where we might turn to our neighbor and ask, “Where were you on 9/11?”

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Lucy—in fact, a number of Lucys—may have some “ ’splaining” to do as the annual Purple Feet Festival and Grape Stomp unfolds from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. this Saturday, Sept. 13, at Silver Coast Winery.

    Once again, a high point at the seventh annual festival will be the Lucy Look-A-Like contest at 3 p.m.

    The competition harks back to Lucille Ball and an old, popular episode of “I Love Lucy” in which the redheaded comedienne found herself crushing grapes with her feet at an Italian vineyard.

  • Even if you’re not old enough to remember the Jim Stafford song from the 1970s, you probably don’t like coming in contact with creepy critters like spiders and snakes. Knowing there are only two venomous spiders and six venomous snakes in North Carolina usually doesn’t help, so let’s take an objective look at the snakes we share this corner of the state with and see if we really do have something to fear.

  • I have decided to write this article with great hopes it will not be needed but reality shows one day you may need to take this clipping down from your refrigerator door and look over what you need to do.

    Cleanup is the first priority after any major storm.

  • As summer progresses, the number of insects found in our landscape increases. There are millions of types of insects in our world and more than 100,000 different ones active in the United States; however, less than 1 percent of these actually feed on plants in a harmful way.

    Before you pull out the insecticide, take the time to identify the insects on your plants. You just may find out that they are beneficial insects. Beneficial insects are those that are helpful in some way, as predators or pollinators. A number of beneficial insects occur naturally in our gardens.

  • “I have found this area to be a dynamic and exciting place to live as an artist. In effect, it has been a rebirth for me and my work,” Southport artist Jan Boland says.

    She joins two other seasoned artists, potter Joyce Grazetti and painter Katrina Fairbank, as featured artists in the new Members Show at Franklin Square Gallery this month. The show launched Aug. 25 runs until Oct. 3.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • “Indulgence” brings to mind a pampered day at the spa or a dessert concoction sporting acres of chocolate with the fat grams and calories to match, but there’s a different kind of indulgence you can enjoy every evening when the sun sets that doesn’t involve mud facials or “death by chocolate”—landscape lighting.

  • People often ask: “What is that yellow butterfly that is flying around everywhere right now?” From my observations, I would say we are beginning to see the first wave of sulphurs visiting our landscapes.

    The Cloudless Sulphur (Phoebis sennae) is a small to midsized butterfly in the family Pieridae found in the Americas. There are several similar species some with angled wings or other sulphurs, which are much smaller. They have a wide range, from South America to Canada, and are most common from Argentina up to southern Florida and Texas.

  • Southeastern native plants are ablaze with color in the fall. Colorful berries appear to delight the human eye and provide food for hungry birds. The leaves turn orange, red or gold as the weather turns cooler creating beauty throughout the wooded areas and hopefully in your own back yard.

  • Angela Thompson lets her faith guide her, and it has taken her from her hometown of Detroit to Shallotte, where she has practiced family medicine for the past eight years.

    And now it has led her to something she never expected—a career as a gospel songwriter and recording artist.

    “I’ve liked to sing all my life,” she said. “I really started writing and performing since I moved here.”

    Recruited in her residency by Dr. George Saunders, she moved to Shallotte in 2000.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December