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Features

  • Sweet iced tea is as southern as magnolia blossoms and chopped pork barbeque.

    It’s probably blasphemous to admit, but I, as a redneck southern boy, don’t like sweet tea. That’s almost as bad as admitting I don’t particularly like grits. Even though I may not appreciate all of the southern cuisine, the leaves of a camellia are the source of green, black, oolong and white teas.

  • Many gardeners like to have a list of things to do for the start of each month. Hopefully, they will be able to check-off the list before the month is up and this will provide them with a sense of accomplishment.

    Still, others need to have a list just to remind them of gardening things to do before the weather sets in and it is too late. Whatever the reasons, you need to tack a list to the refrigerator as a reminder.

    Gardening tips for October

  • Brunswick County Schools fourth graders took part in Brunswick Town’s annual Colonial Heritage Days last week.

    Costumed volunteers and employees portrayed people from Colonial times and showed students how they lived and worked.

    Brunswick Town has offered a Colonial Heritage Day for about 25 years, and has always been a free field trip for schools.

    “It’s a good exposure to what life was like in this county where they live 200 years ago,” Jim McKee, a costumed character who has worked Colonial Heritage Days for about 13 years, said.

  • Shane Stevens is feeling anything but “Low” these days.

    That’s the title of a song the Calabash native co-wrote that was recently recorded by country music star Sara Evans for “Billy: The Early Years,” a Billy Graham biopic slated to open in theaters nationwide Oct. 10.

    The release of “Low” also marks the first recorded single written by Stevens, which had him on a high as he spoke during a phone interview recently from his 28th-floor apartment in Midtown Manhattan.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing

    Art and craft classes at Cappuccino By The Sea, 3331 Holden Beach Road. Various days and times. For more information, call 842-3661.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Fall means Farm Heritage Day at Indigo Farms.

    The annual event at the historic farm straddling the state line near Hickmans Crossroads is set for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. this Saturday, Oct. 4. Admission is free.

    Learn about the old ways of life on the farm, with day-long demonstrations that will include basket-making, blacksmithing, gun-making, molasses-making, spinning, weaving, and a working 1920s gristmill powered by a 1915 Morse-Fairbanks vertical engine from Horry County Museum.

  • The cooler days of fall make for great working weather with the lower temperatures and humidity. For many who hail from colder climes, pruning trees and shrubs is on the list of chores, but our erratic fall and winter temperatures make heavy fall pruning a bad idea.

  • The trend toward cooler weather is welcomed by most of us, but some unwelcome insect visitors can accompany it.

    Polistes, or paper wasp colonies, are beginning to die out and some of the remaining workers (who will croak eventually), along with next year’s crop of queens, are likely to start bailing out of nests. The surviving queens will seek out some place to pass the winter and all too often our houses become the location of choice. There are several species of paper wasps, but the common ones are mostly brown in color with yellow stripes on their abdomens.

  • September through late October is a good time for dividing your spring and summer blooming perennials in Brunswick County and the Cape Fear Region.

    For the most part, flowering should be nearing an end at this time of the year. That allows plants to put their energy into developing leaves for next season. Roots will continue to grow through the winter and this will help the plant get well established before the next bloom sequence.

  • The theme was “patriotism” for the juried competition at the Sept. 11 meeting of the Coastal Carolina Camera Club.

    Members submitted images depicting different views of patriotic subjects and scenes. The winners were as follows:

    First place: Charlie Mastrovich for “Southport 4th of July.”

    Second place: Wendy Wagner for “Patriotic Reflections.”

    Third place: John Ennis for “Snow Spangled Banner.”

  • Ocean Isle Beach during World War II and before was named Hale’s Beach.

    During World War II, the only structure on Hale’s Beach was a U.S. Coast Guard camp that was home for 20 men on Gause’s Hill. The mission of the Coast Guard men was to ride along the beach every day on horseback and watch for German spies, downed airplanes, submarines, blackout violations, or any suspicious activity.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing

    Art and craft classes at Cappuccino By The Sea, 3331 Holden Beach Road. Various days and times. For more information, call 842-3661.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Franklin Square Gallery in Southport is featuring its new exhibit “The Figure Exposed,” which culminates with an open house at the First Friday Gallery Walk from 5-7 p.m. Oct. 3.

    Last spring, many local painters attended a workshop in experimental techniques in figure painting. They have been refining their paintings over the summer, and this show is the culmination of their work.

  • The cooler days and nights mean our warm-season grasses are slowing growth and getting ready for winter’s dormant period, but there are still some things you can do to keep things looking good through the fall and winter.

    If you just can’t stand the brown grass this winter, overseed with ryegrass in early to mid-October. If weeds are a major problem for you, a pre-emergence herbicide applied now will help. Make sure you keep debris like pine straw and leaves cleaned up.

  • Here are some gardening tips for September.

    Landscaping

    Everyone wants to know the best time to move plants or to plant them. According to extension specialists, the best time is the fall season. Late September and October would be some of the best times for us in the coastal regions but there should still be some good times even in November and early December to plant shrubs and trees. You still have time to put in a fall garden for some of your cool season crops.

    Autumn color ideas

  • What’s eating the leaves on my plant? Hot Line volunteers hear the complaint many times during the growing season. Following is the North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service’s answer to that question:

  • It has been more than four decades since a group of young men and women made their national television debut on The Andy Williams Show, in the fall of 1962.

    That group, The New Christy Minstrels, went on to win a Grammy for their debut recording, “Presenting The New Christy Minstrels.”

    Formed by Randy Sparks in 1961, the group had several Top 40 folk music hits, including “This Land Is Your Land,” “Green, Green,” “Today,” and “Ramblin’”. They are still singing and delighting fans, old and new.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing

    Art and craft classes at Cappuccino By The Sea, 3331 Holden Beach Road. Various days and times. For more information, call 842-3661.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Watch for the following problems. The hotline volunteers have received several requests on the following:

    Fall armyworms in turfgrass

    Fall armyworms have been present in turfgrass for the past week or so and it appears they are now in full gear.

    There are a variety of sizes present and larger armyworms are most damaging. They typically begin near the edge of a turf area and invade across the turf leaving serious damage behind.

  • Large patch is the disease we love to hate most in our lawns in late summer and fall. This fungus has been hanging out all summer waiting for thatch temperatures to drop to around 70 degrees. We should be there right now.

    Check closely for the active disease. If it’s getting started again, apply a fungicide immediately followed by another application in five to six weeks. Products containing triadimefon (Bayleton) work well.