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Features

  • Maggie Stephens will start sixth grade in the fall, and she is already considering a career as a crime scene investigator.

    Like thousands of other students in Brunswick County, she is preparing for Aug. 25, the first day at her new school—Shallotte Middle.

    Maggie says math is her best subject, and after spending the summer in a school-age kids program at Tiny Tots Child Center near Shallotte, she’s ready for the challenges of middle school.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Last week’s article was about some of the issues people have brought up about the use of mulches in the landscape.

    I promised this week we would look at the benefits of mulching, but before we proceed, I want to let you read what our specialist from N.C. State provided to ease some of the concerns about the use of mulch and the presence of termites. Excerpt from Mike Waldvogel:

    The bottom line

  • Recently, we have received several calls on the Extension Master Gardener’s Hot Line concerning lack of blooms on various types of plants.

    Following are some possible reasons—sometimes, there are just no explanations:

    Shrubs and flowers that are supposed to bloom, but don’t often frustrate gardeners. Someone recently reported nothing in their yard would bloom and went on to name several species that normally flower well in this area.

  • South Carolina is the ‘Palmetto’ state in honor of the cabbage palm or sabal palmetto. This trunk-forming palm is native to coastal regions as far north as Bald Head Island, but it does pretty well all the way up to Onslow and Carteret counties in the ‘Tarheel’ state.

    The techniques necessary to successfully transplant a sabal palmetto are similar in some ways to what we try to do with typical trees and shrubs, but vastly different in others.

  • Landing on an aircraft carrier is like hitting a speed bump—a large speed bump! Nothing can prepare you for the experience and there are no words to describe it.

    A group of us were recently honored to fly out to the aircraft carrier Eisenhower, to stay overnight and observe flight operations. Although we knew about the trip a few months earlier, the Navy couldn’t give us details. I got the word a week before we departed our orders were being cut, we’d be flying to the Ike but they wouldn’t say where we were going.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

    5-7 p.m., First Friday Gallery Walk, downtown Southport. Refreshments, entertainment, horse-drawn carriage rides. Sponsored by Franklin Square Gallery, Ricky Evans Gallery, Lantana’s Gallery and Fine Gifts and Cape Fear Coppershop. For more information, call 457-1129 or 457-0957.

  • On the 15th of August in the auditorium of Odell,

    A crowd gathered ’round under quite a spell;

    Brunswick Little Theatre was getting amuse-ical,

    As the cast cast its magic in “Seussical: The Musical!”

    Theatergoers who missed opening weekend of Brunswick Little Theatre’s latest production celebrating Dr. Seuss have three more chances this weekend.

  • Whether you have a faithful sidekick or not, it’s time for the “Lawn Ranger” to get busy.

    During these hot times when grass is really growing, it’s important to saddle up that lawn mower often and keep the blades sharp. This month is also the right time to fertilize Bermuda, zoysia, and St. Augustine if you’re following N.C. State University’s recommendations—and who wouldn’t be?

  • It is time again for the annual soil sampling promotion.

    Now is an excellent time to take soil samples. Submitting samples now results in receiving your analysis in three to four weeks or less, rather than submitting in the winter, which will take 12-16 weeks minimum for results to be received.

  • Mulching is one of the most beneficial practices you can do in the landscape. Each year when I teach the Master Gardener class, I challenge them to come up with at least 20 things mulches do in the landscape that would be considered beneficial.

    Somehow, we always get the question about the use of certain types of mulch and the concern for the health and safety of pets and if there are any other concerns about using mulch around the base or foundation of a house.

  • “I love taking a piece of clay and creating something that will remind people of the Southport/Oak Island area,” said local potter Lynn Stanzlaus.

    The Oak Island resident is one of three featured artists at the New Members Show this month at Franklin Square Gallery, joining watercolorists William James and Prentiss Halladay.

    The scenery of Southport and the surrounding beaches and marshes has inspired local and regional artists, especially the three under the spotlight this month.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • My mother always said idle hands were the devil’s workshop among other things I tried to ignore as a kid. If you are looking for ways to avoid becoming a conduit for Beelzebub, I have several garden honey-do’s that will pay off handsomely.

    Crape myrtles that have finished their first round of blooms can usually be coaxed into an encore performance with just a little work.

  • Pruning

    For additional flowering, deadheading some of your favorite flowers now may force them to bloom again in the fall. Light pruning may be performed for most landscape plants except those you expect to have blooms from next spring such as azaleas. Storm damaged tissue may make it necessary to make heavier pruning cuts than normal to repair broken, leaning or dangerous limbs.

  • As a result of one of our reader’s comments, the following information is provided on planting a second summer vegetable crop:

    The thermometer may be stuck on 90 degrees, but don’t let the summer heat beat you out of a second crop of fresh summer veggies. There is still time for another crop across much of North Carolina, especially along the coastal area.

  • LITTLE RIVER, S.C.—Beauty on Saturday night was definitely in the eyes of the beholders—the audience and judges who attended a womanless pageant, that is.

    Staged at North Myrtle Beach High School, the first Kayla Marie Bennett Memorial Scholarship Womanless Beauty Pageant drew 22 “lovely” males who gussied up and strutted their stuff for the fundraiser.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Imagine strolling the beach, when suddenly a nimble-footed troupe starts dancing on the sand.

    Such flights of fancy are reality at the Sarus Performing Arts Festival, which stages dance on the beach, downtown, at museums and other creative venues in the greater Wilmington area when the audience may least expect it.

    Site-specific performances take place in non-traditional and unusual locations, turning architecture and nature into playgrounds for artistic expression and community meetings.

  • Everyone knows mulch is a great thing to add to newly planted trees and shrubs. It helps conserve moisture, keeps the soil cooler and helps control weeds.

    As we do applied research and learn more about how plants respond to various practices, we often find out “what everyone knows” isn’t necessarily correct. Information generated by Dr. Ed Gilman at the University of Florida over the last few years is changing the way we think about using mulches.