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Features

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

    5-7 p.m., First Friday Gallery Walk, downtown Southport. Refreshments, entertainment, horse-drawn carriage rides. Sponsored by Franklin Square Gallery, Ricky Evans Gallery, Lantana’s Gallery and Fine Gifts and Cape Fear Coppershop. For more information, call 457-1129 or 457-0957.

  • On the 15th of August in the auditorium of Odell,

    A crowd gathered ’round under quite a spell;

    Brunswick Little Theatre was getting amuse-ical,

    As the cast cast its magic in “Seussical: The Musical!”

    Theatergoers who missed opening weekend of Brunswick Little Theatre’s latest production celebrating Dr. Seuss have three more chances this weekend.

  • Whether you have a faithful sidekick or not, it’s time for the “Lawn Ranger” to get busy.

    During these hot times when grass is really growing, it’s important to saddle up that lawn mower often and keep the blades sharp. This month is also the right time to fertilize Bermuda, zoysia, and St. Augustine if you’re following N.C. State University’s recommendations—and who wouldn’t be?

  • It is time again for the annual soil sampling promotion.

    Now is an excellent time to take soil samples. Submitting samples now results in receiving your analysis in three to four weeks or less, rather than submitting in the winter, which will take 12-16 weeks minimum for results to be received.

  • Mulching is one of the most beneficial practices you can do in the landscape. Each year when I teach the Master Gardener class, I challenge them to come up with at least 20 things mulches do in the landscape that would be considered beneficial.

    Somehow, we always get the question about the use of certain types of mulch and the concern for the health and safety of pets and if there are any other concerns about using mulch around the base or foundation of a house.

  • “I love taking a piece of clay and creating something that will remind people of the Southport/Oak Island area,” said local potter Lynn Stanzlaus.

    The Oak Island resident is one of three featured artists at the New Members Show this month at Franklin Square Gallery, joining watercolorists William James and Prentiss Halladay.

    The scenery of Southport and the surrounding beaches and marshes has inspired local and regional artists, especially the three under the spotlight this month.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Every first Friday through December

  • My mother always said idle hands were the devil’s workshop among other things I tried to ignore as a kid. If you are looking for ways to avoid becoming a conduit for Beelzebub, I have several garden honey-do’s that will pay off handsomely.

    Crape myrtles that have finished their first round of blooms can usually be coaxed into an encore performance with just a little work.

  • Pruning

    For additional flowering, deadheading some of your favorite flowers now may force them to bloom again in the fall. Light pruning may be performed for most landscape plants except those you expect to have blooms from next spring such as azaleas. Storm damaged tissue may make it necessary to make heavier pruning cuts than normal to repair broken, leaning or dangerous limbs.

  • As a result of one of our reader’s comments, the following information is provided on planting a second summer vegetable crop:

    The thermometer may be stuck on 90 degrees, but don’t let the summer heat beat you out of a second crop of fresh summer veggies. There is still time for another crop across much of North Carolina, especially along the coastal area.

  • LITTLE RIVER, S.C.—Beauty on Saturday night was definitely in the eyes of the beholders—the audience and judges who attended a womanless pageant, that is.

    Staged at North Myrtle Beach High School, the first Kayla Marie Bennett Memorial Scholarship Womanless Beauty Pageant drew 22 “lovely” males who gussied up and strutted their stuff for the fundraiser.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Imagine strolling the beach, when suddenly a nimble-footed troupe starts dancing on the sand.

    Such flights of fancy are reality at the Sarus Performing Arts Festival, which stages dance on the beach, downtown, at museums and other creative venues in the greater Wilmington area when the audience may least expect it.

    Site-specific performances take place in non-traditional and unusual locations, turning architecture and nature into playgrounds for artistic expression and community meetings.

  • Everyone knows mulch is a great thing to add to newly planted trees and shrubs. It helps conserve moisture, keeps the soil cooler and helps control weeds.

    As we do applied research and learn more about how plants respond to various practices, we often find out “what everyone knows” isn’t necessarily correct. Information generated by Dr. Ed Gilman at the University of Florida over the last few years is changing the way we think about using mulches.

  • Want to get a little more bang for the buck with your crape myrtles? Prune off spent crape myrtle blossoms to prolong the flowering period. This works best on smaller plants where it’s easier to reach the flowers from the ground. You may also prune bleeder trees such as maple, dogwood, birch and elm this month.

    Summer gardening tips

    Hot, dry weather favors powdery mildew. It is typically not fatal to woody ornamentals but can make them look bad. To control, spray every 7 to 14 days as soon as you notice the disease.

  • A July 9 press release from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services mentions the death of a Wilkes County resident is likely due to Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF).

    As noted by Dr. Leah Devlin, the state health director, North Carolina had 665 cases of RMSF reported in 2007. We are likely to see an upsurge of queries about ticks and tick-borne diseases.

    There are no magic fixes to tick problems but there are measures (both chemical and non-chemical) people can use to reduce tick infestations around their property and to protect themselves and family:

  • The first people to live on and near Ocean Isle Beach were Native Americans who arrived here about 10,000 B.C.

    There are many Native-American arrowheads and pottery pieces in farmers’ fields around Ocean Isle. The primary tribe in the Ocean Isle Beach area was the Cape Fear Indians, but there were also a few settlements of Waccamaw, Iroquois, Catawba, Lumbee and Choctaw. All of these tribes spoke the Siouan language.

  • SHALLOTTE—Shaleigh Scott has been through a lot, her sister Pam Flowers said.

    Despite numerous health problems that have kept her home-bound, Scott turned to creative pursuits to garner two first-place ribbons and a best-in-show award in the hobbyist category at the 40th Annual South Carolina Ceramics Association Show on June 13-14 in Columbia, S.C.

    Flowers convinced her younger sister to enter her work in the competition.

    “We both broke down when we realized the two pieces she entered had won,” Flowers said.

  • Wilmington-area audiences have an opportunity to witness the premiere of new works developed in residency at a gala performance of The Carolina Ballet in UNCW’s Kenan Auditorium at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 2.

    Raleigh-based Carolina Ballet, along with nearly 100 young dancers from both the United States and abroad, has been on the University of North Carolina Wilmington campus for a month-long summer residency.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December