.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Daylilies are tolerant of almost anything nature or humans can cast upon them—heat, cold, drought and neglect. They are remarkably resistant to diseases and pest problems.

    Daylilies require little care, increasing in number and beauty year after year. Their spectacular blooms create a palette of colors. Thirty-five thousand plus registered varieties can be found in a kaleidoscope of extravagant shades—creamy beige, lemon yellow, pale lavender, hot magenta, candy pink, pizza orange, splashy red and royal purple.

  • SHALLOTTE POINT—Lillian Gray’s face lights up when she talks about all her “angels” have done for her.

    Since having back surgery, the once avid gardener hasn’t been able to keep up her outdoor showplace as much as she used to. Gray says she was feeling bad about the vines growing up and choking her azalea bushes around her historic two-story house in Shallotte Point, so she asked for a little help.

  • Title sponsor James E. Moore Insurance Agency, the YWCA and more than 450 guests honored women and teen leaders from Brunswick, Columbus, New Hanover and Pender counties at the Women of Achievement Awards on Thursday, May 22, at UNC-Wilmington.

    “This 24th annual event not only acknowledges and honors extraordinary leaders in our community, it also serves as a primary fundraiser,” said Lois Cook Steele, YWCA executive director. “Through the generosity of our sponsors and guests, we raised much needed funds for the programs and services that we offer.”

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through June 15

  • Guided walks to Bird Island are back for another season.

    At 9 a.m. every Wednesday through August, visitors are invited to meet at the last westward walkover at 40th Street in Sunset Beach for a guided stroll down the beach to the pristine, uninhabited island.

    A knowledgeable tour guide leads the way, offering information and answering questions during the hour-long beach walk.

    Topics include beachcombing, sand dune wildlife, habitats of Bird Island and the history of Bird Island.

  • Shallotte native David Pickett has several photographs from his pictorial art collection displayed at the North Myrtle Beach, S.C., Library through June 30.

    The exhibit is dedicated to Pickett’s late wife, Brenda Purdy, his late uncle, Norman Jones, and his 89-year-old photo mentor John Davis of Asheville.

    Pickett taught his wife various aspects of photography. She enjoyed photographing children and beautiful scenery. His uncle Norman encouraged him to draw while in the first grade.

  • As we become more and more crowded with new developments and the subsequent clearing and bush hogging of properties, it becomes more and more imperative to create wildlife habits in our own backyards and communities.

    Most of us are already at least part way there. Just a few simple adjustments to our garden areas can make our yards much more hospitable to the birds, bees and butterflies. We rely on these amazing creatures for their beauty and also for their ability to pollinate.

  • Mimosas are putting on their summer show of silky, pink flowers all over southeastern North Carolina. With beautiful flowers and incredibly fast growth, you would think this medium-sized tree would be a popular addition to the landscape. Unfortunately, this plant tends to be a little on the trashy side with seedlings popping up all over the place.

  • Insects: Some of the first wave of Japanese beetles have already made their presence known and have been seen on some crape myrtles, as well as some other popular landscape ornamentals. There are a number of pyrethrins that may be used to control Japanese beetles. You may wish to check some of these out: Talstar, Decathlon, Astro and X-clude. Orthene, Sevin and Malathion may also be used. Be sure to follow label directions.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through June 15

  • Once upon a time in America, you could find seaside amusement parks in virtually every beachfront resort town from Maine to Florida.

    Today, fewer than 20 oceanside parks dot the entire East Coast.

    One of them is Family Kingdom Amusement Park just down the coast in Myrtle Beach, S.C., which is still providing family thrills after more than 40 years.

  • Those of you who are “mature” enough to remember Jackie Gleason before his Smokey and the Bandit days may remember his catch phrase, “How sweet it is.”

    While he was talking about life in general, he could have been describing a great native plant with sweet-scented blooms that are open right now—sweetbay magnolia. Even when the flowers have faded, you’ll be left with interesting leaves with a silvery underside that look great when the wind blows and bright red fruit.

  • Many trees and shrubs are selected because of their flowering habit. It can be discouraging when they fail to bloom or set fruit. It is often difficult to pinpoint the exact cause of a plant’s failure to bloom, however, here are some possibilities:

  • The landscape will be viewed from within the house as well as out-of-doors, and this must be taken into consideration.

    My patio is an extension of the indoor room it adjoins. I consider it an outdoor room. Some homeowners want weed-free turfgrass in the public area while another might plant an English-type garden of colorful blooms.

  • West Brunswick High School students kicked off their Sunday shoes last weekend when they performed the musical “Footloose.”

    A cast of 40 students and 14 members of the show choir rehearsed since March for the show. Kate Flynn, Leslie Jackson and Allie Marshall helped backstage and behind the scenes.

    Amanda Penegar, theater arts director, said she has always loved the movie version, and the students couldn’t have agreed more.

  • SHALLOTTE—As Gerald Hewett stood in his back yard, a chortle arose from rows of gourds suspended on frames high overhead.

    “They’re getting fussy now,” Hewett said of the purple martin swallows that fly into his yard every spring to nest in the gourd houses he grew and crafted just for them.

    The 70-year-old said he’s been cultivating martin houses for 60 years, using gourds just like Native Americans did.

  • SUNSET BEACH—Starting Sunday, hard-shelled marine reptiles will once again be the talk of the town as seasonal sea turtle programs launch at the beach.

    During the summer months, Sunset Beach’s “Turtle Time” educational and informational programs take place on Sunday nights on the island and on Wednesday afternoons at Ingram Planetarium.

    Weather permitting, the season’s first session is scheduled to launch at 7 p.m. this Sunday, June 1, in the parking lot of Sunset Properties, 419 S. Sunset Blvd. on the Sunset Beach island.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through June 15

  • No, you haven’t passed through a time warp where Zeros are swooping in to drop torpedo bombs on the U.S.S. Arizona. But, we do have a Japanese invasion that’s just getting started—the annual invasion of our gardens by the Japanese beetle.

    While these coppery-brown and green beetles have a voracious appetite for several hundred different plants, they really like to skeletonize the leaves of roses and grape vines. White or yellow roses are especially attractive.

  • Poison ivy is an unwanted weed that shows up in residential home and commercial landscape projects. To sensitive individuals, the effect of poison ivy can be an interference with daily contracting activities. Some people are more sensitive than others to the effects of poison ivy; however, sensitivity can change from time to time so that someone who was not affected by it at one time can get a reaction at another time.