.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Many questions have been asked about lichens. The following is a great article by Dan Mullins, Extension agent in Santa Rosa County, Fla.

    Things aren’t always what they seem in the landscape and such is the case when lichens infest shrubs. These gray-green scaly, crusty or hairy structures found on the branches of landscape plants are often unfairly blamed for causing sickly, dying shrubs.

  • A physically active lifestyle enhances the quality of life and benefits health at any age. Physical activity does not need to be strenuous to achieve health benefits. In fact, participation in moderate amounts of physical activity helps lower the risk of some diseases and provides other health benefits. Below you will find health benefits of being physically active:

    Increases in physical activity

    •Helps build and maintain healthy bones, muscles, and joints

    •Helps weight loss, maintenance of weight loss, and prevents weight gain

  • Southern magnolias have already begun their summer show and the early-blooming crape myrtles like Natchez won’t be far behind. Included are a few of the things I learned after observing these plants since last year.

    Little Gem continues to be the most popular southern magnolia in the trade. There are some perfectly good reasons for that. It fits better into most gardens since it only reaches about 30 feet or so. Little Gem also blooms heavily at an early age. That’s something many of the southern magnolias don’t do.

  • The Winding River Players theatre group hosted a dinner theater on Saturday, April 26, with more than 150 guests. It was in celebration of Winding River Plantation’s new Property Owners’ Club. A cast of 44 and more than 10 behind-the-scenes volunteers worked together for eight weeks to produce “Celebrity Apprentice,” an original script written and directed by Sue MacCallum.

  • BALD HEAD ISLAND—The community, businesses and developer of Bald Head Island recently teamed with the Wounded Warriors Project to host three soldiers and their families on the island for a weekend retreat.

    The soldiers, who visited April 10-14, have all suffered severe injuries during service.

    While on Bald Head Island, the families had a chance to spend quality time together to relax and heal while escaping the rigors of everyday life.

  • Mallory Ward has been named as Honorary Skipper for the Southport Leukemia Cup, according to a news release.

    The 9-year-old daughter of Sabrina Ward of Nakina will serve as hostess for the May 16-18 event.

    The Leukemia Cup is a regional fundraising event, hosted by The Cape Fear Yacht Club and Southport Sail and Power Squadron, with proceeds going to the Eastern North Carolina Chapter of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through June 15

  • For the 27th year, a sleepy fishing village just south of the Carolinas border will come alive and get crabby as the award-winning Little River, S.C., Blue Crab Festival unfolds this Saturday and Sunday, May 17 and 18.

    Situated beneath historic live oak trees on the unincorporated town’s waterfront, the festival will encompass plenty of food, round-the-clock entertainment, rows of arts and crafts booths and children’s activities.

    Hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.

  • Legendary singer Percy Sledge will take the stage of Odell Williamson Auditorium at Brunswick Community College in concert at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 16.

    Mention the name Percy Sledge to most any music fan in the world, and you’ll invariably elicit a woebegone version of “When A Man Loves A Woman.”

    It’s Sledge’s signature song and a tune that defined the summer of 1966 and each one thereafter. Sledge, however, is far from a one-hit wonder.

  • Many homeowners care for lawns, gardens, shrubs and trees by applying plant nutrients and sometimes pesticides.

    When these items are improperly stored or applied, the result may be that these products move through the soil into the groundwater or wash off into surface waters.

    Fertilizers should be stored in a locked, dry cabinet. Keep fertilizers and pesticides on separate shelves. Load your fertilizer spreader on the driveway or other hard surface so you can easily sweep up any spills.

  • ‘Full steam ahead‘ for Turfgrass

    Now is the time to get started on the warm season grass activities (e.g. Bermuda, centipede, zoysia and St. Augustine).

    Seed, sprig, plug or plant rolls of sod now and throughout the summer in the Cape Fear region of North Carolina.

    Fertilize, water, mow low and let it grow. Centipede is the exception to the typical lime and fertilizer suggestions, since centipedegrass prefers acid soils and fertilizing just once in early June.

  • There is no plant success story quite like the one for loropetalumor (Chinese fringe flower).

    The traditional plant with green leaves and creamy white flowers languished in relative obscurity for several hundred years.

    Interest in the plant exploded in the 1980s with the introduction of selections with burgundy foliage and hot pink flowers. Now, only 20 years later, pink loropetalums are as common as Dale Earnhardt Jr. T-shirts at Talledaga.

  • A coastal sunrise breaks over the horizon, bathing in vivid hues a Carolina marsh looking very much like one in Brunswick County.

    Other coastal scenes are captured in the acrylic paintings of Brunswick County native Norman “Marshall” Gore, a former prisoner whose work was recently chosen for display and sale at Sunset River Marketplace in Calabash.

    Since his release from a halfway house in March after more than 25 years in prison, Gore, 46, is striving to launch a new career as an artist, in a new direction from his criminal past.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through May 9

  • Outsider art will be celebrated this weekend as the Eighth Annual Summer Folk Art Festival kicks off at House of Blues in North Myrtle Beach, S.C.

    Regional and national artists will display their work around the venue for purchase.

    The festival will open at 9 a.m. and continue until 10 p.m. May 10 and 11. Admission is free.

  • Sunset River Marketplace’s “Creative Exchange” series continues with “The Art of Serving Tea” by Kathy Cody and Anna Arlington, owners of the Calabash Garden Tea Room and Gift Shop. It will be from 11 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. on Wednesday, May 14, at Sunset River Marketplace in Calabash.

  • A fellow stopped by the office last week and asked a very pertinent question: “Isn’t grass supposed to be green?” He had a centipede lawn with lots of yellow spots and streaks that turned even more yellow when he added nitrogen.

    If this sounds like your lawn, you’re probably dealing with high pH soils and iron chlorosis. For most folks, talking about the vagaries of plant nutrition is about as exciting as watching the one stoplight change in the little town I grew up in, so I won’t bore you with all of the gory details.

  • Based on the number of calls coming into the office, carpenter bees appear to be gearing up for another season of aggravating homeowners. Carpenter bees resemble bumblebees, but they have abdomens that are entirely black and shiny. Bumblebees have yellow hairs on their abdomens.

    In the spring, carpenter bees drill holes about 3/8-inch in diameter into wood, most notably into decks, eaves and siding. Last year, many of the complaints we received indicated the bees seem to have a real liking for cedar and cypress siding.

  • Spring has started on a dry note along our coastline. Drought conditions are unpredictable and can be difficult to deal with in the landscape. Although droughts are usually thought of as long periods of time, such as months or years, our sandy soils can experience drought conditions after only a few days without rain. Even if we don’t have an outright drought this summer, preparing your lawn for dry weather is smart.

  • The Tri-Beach Cruisers Car Club had its annual Bash at the Beach on Saturday in the Home Depot parking lot.

    Club president Fred Taylor said the club formed in 1998 as an outlet for people to show and share their love of cars. An annual fundraiser has been every year since the club’s beginning.

    The first year, the club raised $6,800, which was donated to three local girls who had been injured in automobile accidents.