.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Bring your dancing shoes and lawn chairs to the week’s latest Concerts on the Coast.

    Billy Scott & the Party Prophets will perform their trademark beach music from 6:30-8 p.m. Friday, June 27, at the Museum of Coastal Carolina parking lot, 21 E. Second St. in Ocean Isle Beach.

    The Used-To-Be’s will play 1950s and 1960s music from 6:30-8 p.m. Sunday, June 29, at the end of Jordan Boulevard in Holden Beach.

  • New York soul singer Angel Rissoff has completed his CD, “Nu Soul Stew,” and will be in the Carolinas to promote its release. The initial CD release party, featuring Rissoff and Nashville guitarist Rickey Godfrey, will be at J.B. Pivots in Charleston, S.C., on June 26.

    The duo will take the tour to the Spanish Galleon in North Myrtle Beach, S.C. on Friday, June 27, and Chaser’s on Oak Island on Saturday, June 28.

    The 13-track CD includes a combination of soul, jump blues and R&B.

  • Home vegetable gardening is one of the most popular hobbies listed and in this day and time can help families out with their rising food bills.

    There is still some time left to start a garden with certain crops and others you may need to wait until August to start some of the fall gardens.

    Please contact your local Cooperative Extension Service for advice on which crops to plant and when would be the best time to plant them. For now, many gardeners are beginning to reap the benefits of their labor. Here are some tips on harvesting your vegetables:

  • I visited Universal Studios’ theme park in southern California last week where they still have a section devoted to Kevin Costner’s 1995 movie flop, “Waterworld.” Those of you who may have seen it already know the plot revolves around a world after the polar icecaps have melted and dry land is hard to find.

    We haven’t had too much trouble finding dry land in the last year or so, but observing southern California landscapes has reinforced an old opinion of mine that we water our trees, shrubs and lawns way more than we have to.

  • If you enjoy the beauty of butterflies, why not create an area in your landscape for them?

    Butterflies are colorful, delicate and graceful in flight. Their visits to your flowers have a purpose—it is a quest for the necessities of life. Plant their favorite nectar plants if you want to attract them.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December

  • As part of the Fourth of July festivities in Southport, each year Franklin Square Gallery invites artists from across the country to participate in its July National Exhibition, a juried show.

    These artists from afar join local and regional entrants. First slides of submissions are judged for them to become part of the show, and accepted artwork is then shipped to the gallery for the exhibition. Artists are in contention for prizes totaling more than $6,000 in cash, merchandise and guaranteed purchase awards.

  • Artwork by Kristin Gibson is on display in the lobby of the N.C. Aquarium at Fort Fisher.

    Two pieces called “Into the Aquarium I” and “Into the Aquarium II” feature aquatic life such as stingrays and turtles. Both are made of wax and dye on silk.

    Gibson lives in Carolina Beach with her family, and paints from her home and backyard in a space called “Saltwater Studio.” The name gives a nod to a lifetime lived by the sea and to the salt and water integral to her process.

  • While there are many plant diseases that make growing tomatoes a challenge in the Southeast, a relatively new disease threatens to make homegrown tomatoes almost impossible for many local gardeners.

    Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV) is different from most tomato diseases because a virus, rather than a fungus or bacteria, cause it.

  • One of the first signs of drought stress in ornamentals and turf is wilting. Many of our favorite plants show drought related symptoms differently. The leaves of some plants may exhibit marginal leaf burn or leaf scorching while others will simply wilt.

  • Daylilies are tolerant of almost anything nature or humans can cast upon them—heat, cold, drought and neglect. They are remarkably resistant to diseases and pest problems.

    Daylilies require little care, increasing in number and beauty year after year. Their spectacular blooms create a palette of colors. Thirty-five thousand plus registered varieties can be found in a kaleidoscope of extravagant shades—creamy beige, lemon yellow, pale lavender, hot magenta, candy pink, pizza orange, splashy red and royal purple.

  • SHALLOTTE POINT—Lillian Gray’s face lights up when she talks about all her “angels” have done for her.

    Since having back surgery, the once avid gardener hasn’t been able to keep up her outdoor showplace as much as she used to. Gray says she was feeling bad about the vines growing up and choking her azalea bushes around her historic two-story house in Shallotte Point, so she asked for a little help.

  • Title sponsor James E. Moore Insurance Agency, the YWCA and more than 450 guests honored women and teen leaders from Brunswick, Columbus, New Hanover and Pender counties at the Women of Achievement Awards on Thursday, May 22, at UNC-Wilmington.

    “This 24th annual event not only acknowledges and honors extraordinary leaders in our community, it also serves as a primary fundraiser,” said Lois Cook Steele, YWCA executive director. “Through the generosity of our sponsors and guests, we raised much needed funds for the programs and services that we offer.”

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through June 15

  • Guided walks to Bird Island are back for another season.

    At 9 a.m. every Wednesday through August, visitors are invited to meet at the last westward walkover at 40th Street in Sunset Beach for a guided stroll down the beach to the pristine, uninhabited island.

    A knowledgeable tour guide leads the way, offering information and answering questions during the hour-long beach walk.

    Topics include beachcombing, sand dune wildlife, habitats of Bird Island and the history of Bird Island.

  • Shallotte native David Pickett has several photographs from his pictorial art collection displayed at the North Myrtle Beach, S.C., Library through June 30.

    The exhibit is dedicated to Pickett’s late wife, Brenda Purdy, his late uncle, Norman Jones, and his 89-year-old photo mentor John Davis of Asheville.

    Pickett taught his wife various aspects of photography. She enjoyed photographing children and beautiful scenery. His uncle Norman encouraged him to draw while in the first grade.

  • As we become more and more crowded with new developments and the subsequent clearing and bush hogging of properties, it becomes more and more imperative to create wildlife habits in our own backyards and communities.

    Most of us are already at least part way there. Just a few simple adjustments to our garden areas can make our yards much more hospitable to the birds, bees and butterflies. We rely on these amazing creatures for their beauty and also for their ability to pollinate.

  • Mimosas are putting on their summer show of silky, pink flowers all over southeastern North Carolina. With beautiful flowers and incredibly fast growth, you would think this medium-sized tree would be a popular addition to the landscape. Unfortunately, this plant tends to be a little on the trashy side with seedlings popping up all over the place.

  • Insects: Some of the first wave of Japanese beetles have already made their presence known and have been seen on some crape myrtles, as well as some other popular landscape ornamentals. There are a number of pyrethrins that may be used to control Japanese beetles. You may wish to check some of these out: Talstar, Decathlon, Astro and X-clude. Orthene, Sevin and Malathion may also be used. Be sure to follow label directions.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through June 15