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Features

  • A fellow stopped by the office last week and asked a very pertinent question: “Isn’t grass supposed to be green?” He had a centipede lawn with lots of yellow spots and streaks that turned even more yellow when he added nitrogen.

    If this sounds like your lawn, you’re probably dealing with high pH soils and iron chlorosis. For most folks, talking about the vagaries of plant nutrition is about as exciting as watching the one stoplight change in the little town I grew up in, so I won’t bore you with all of the gory details.

  • Based on the number of calls coming into the office, carpenter bees appear to be gearing up for another season of aggravating homeowners. Carpenter bees resemble bumblebees, but they have abdomens that are entirely black and shiny. Bumblebees have yellow hairs on their abdomens.

    In the spring, carpenter bees drill holes about 3/8-inch in diameter into wood, most notably into decks, eaves and siding. Last year, many of the complaints we received indicated the bees seem to have a real liking for cedar and cypress siding.

  • Spring has started on a dry note along our coastline. Drought conditions are unpredictable and can be difficult to deal with in the landscape. Although droughts are usually thought of as long periods of time, such as months or years, our sandy soils can experience drought conditions after only a few days without rain. Even if we don’t have an outright drought this summer, preparing your lawn for dry weather is smart.

  • The Tri-Beach Cruisers Car Club had its annual Bash at the Beach on Saturday in the Home Depot parking lot.

    Club president Fred Taylor said the club formed in 1998 as an outlet for people to show and share their love of cars. An annual fundraiser has been every year since the club’s beginning.

    The first year, the club raised $6,800, which was donated to three local girls who had been injured in automobile accidents.

  • Three local artists take the spotlight in Franklin Square Gallery's new Members Show running from May 12 to June 19. Painters Susan Sokolowski and Ann Thompson and potter Eileen Gordon will be featured in this new exhibit by the members of the Associated Artists of Southport .

    Their diverse styles are the culmination of years of experience and recent classes and workshops, yet each still reflects on her continuing passion for art.

    Susan Sokolowski's detailed oil paintings often capture the immediacy of a scene because many are created from her own photographs.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through May 9

  • Sunset River Marketplace art gallery in Calabash, is featuring works in pastel by Kevin Beck through May 9. Beck is a contemporary artist living in Blowing Rock.

    Known for the vibrancy and resonance of his palette, this well-known colorist sees and interprets the landscape in shades of teal, chartreuse and berry. Viewers are transfixed by the depth and translucence of his work both in pastel and oil.

  • The next step after developing a landscape plan and selecting the recommended plants adaptive to your area is to buy good quality plants free from insects and diseases. Be sure to inspect them thoroughly because if you don’t already have a problem in the landscape then you certainly don’t want to introduce one at this stage in the landscape process.

    People think plants can take care of themselves but giving them the best chance to survive and do well starts with the selection process and buying good quality plants.

  • Transplants from other parts of the world already know it is a requirement you include evergreen azaleas in your landscape. Shirk this responsibility and the azalea police will be on your case faster than a Garden-stater can utter “youse guys.” In an effort to help you avoid this unpleasantness, here are some tips on growing azaleas along with some varieties to consider.

  • The next two articles will attempt to answer questions that seem to be asked every spring. Hopefully, the two will prove helpful to our local residents.

    As soon as the weather turns warm, the lawn questions start. One of the most frequent concerns of gardeners this time of year is a “dead spot” in the lawn. Patches of dead grass in spring are common, can be caused by several factors and are very difficult to diagnosis correctly. Extensive grass loss through the winter is usually caused by something that happened several months ago.

  • CALABASH—Lois Wilkinson brakes for plants, especially those she saw for sale at Carolyn’s Flowers on Persimmon Road last week.

    “I just heard about this place,” Wilkinson said, browsing the latest spring array of potted flowers and plants Calabash native Carolyn Schreiber has cultivated to sell for another season at the roadside stand in front of her house.

    “I need flowers that need a lot of sun,” Wilkinson said as Schreiber, a natural-born gardener, assisted her.

  • HOLDEN BEACH—It’s that time of year again for spring festivities, a bopple race, and an age-old question by newcomers, “What the heck is a bopple?”

    It’s the high-point event of Days at the Docks, Holden Beach’s annual salute-to-spring festival scheduled for this Saturday and Sunday under and around the Brunswick Island town’s high-rise bridge.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999.

    Ongoing through May 9

  • Seems like the ticks are trying to take over the world (at least the Brunswick County portion). If you stay outside much, these pests seem to be everywhere.

    The Extension agents are reporting what seems to be an inordinate amount of these obnoxious little creatures awaiting a meal, and that meal may be you! The Master Gardener Hotline has received calls concerning ticks. Homeowners with natural landscapes will normally have more of a problem than others.

  • Small gardens often must rely on fencing to provide privacy. We don’t have enough room to plant large evergreens that grow wide and take up the limited space, but plain fencing doesn’t make any gardener’s heart skip a beat. To solve this problem, consider vines for foliage, flowers and a welcome softening of the stark fencing.

    Wisterias have a horrible reputation for swallowing everything in their path. For the ones from China and Japan, it is well deserved, but the American wisterias aren’t nearly as invasive.

  • There are numerous ideas and misconceptions about what constitutes good topsoil. Some gardeners have the idea any and all material sold and marketed as topsoil has some magical ability to grow plants. Once unloaded off the truck and graded out, the true characteristics begin to appear...clods, rocks, cans, plastic bottles and roots. You also can receive numerous exotic weed seed.

  • Ocean Isle Beach may have its own George Clooney in the making, although this up-and-coming movie actor is not interested in being a major player on the Hollywood scene.

    He says he has a higher calling.

    People who attend the musical dramas at Ocean View Baptist Church are familiar with 25-year-old Adam Melton. He’s played the role of the risen Jesus in the Easter performances for several years and various parts in the Christmas musicals directed by his father, Larry Melton, the church’s music director.

  • A crowd of more than 400 turned out to honor Walter Harvest “Harvey” Robinson at his 100th birthday party and dinner Saturday, April 5, at Bolivia Elementary School.

    The Supply centenarian, also known through the years as Granddaddy, Uncle Harvey and Pops, was accompanied by his wife of 17 years, Eva, who’s 85.

    The event also paid tribute to Robinson’s late, first wife, Rosie Mae Hankins-Robinson, to whom he was married 54 years, his three children and eight step-children and their spouses.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild Exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday–Friday and 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday. Artwork available for sale. Exhibit is renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999.

    Ongoing through May 10

  • Now we should be out of the woods as far as frosts and freezes go. It’s time to think about adding some high impact annual color in the landscape.

    Before we get too deep into what to plant, you need to do some prep work. Most annuals need good soils. What’s a good soil? That means high organic matter, high fertility and good drainage.