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Features

  • As the afternoon wears into dusk Aug. 1, pirate ships will lurk at the entrance to the Bald Head Island Harbor preparing to “invade” the island.

    It will mark the beginning of the National Lighthouse Day celebration, sponsored by The Old Baldy Foundation and Bald Head Island Ltd.

    On Aug. 1, young mates can learn to walk, talk and act like a pirate while discovering the history of pirates along the Carolina Silver Coast with Blackbeard’s Crew, a living history performance group.

  • New gardeners tend to be a bit obsessive about their lawns and landscapes. Like the French and the English who copied their style, evergreen shrubs must be controlled into boxes and balls. If we have one plant on this side of the walkway, symmetry demands a repeat on the other. Expansive lawns must be immaculate, perfectly groomed and weed-free. That works pretty well if you’re Louis XIV or King George with an army of serfs to do your bidding.

  • Whenever we have a heat wave like the ones we have been having on and off this summer, it is a good idea to take frequent breaks and replenish lost liquids as you work. We want you to enjoy your garden and not end up in the hospital. Here are a few things to do and to be looking for at this time of year:

  • Rudbeckias (black-eyed Susans) are members of the large and diverse Asteracea family. They are native only to North America and require only minimal care.

    There are about 25 species, and they can be perennials, biennials or annuals. Most spread by rhizomes (underground stolons) eventually creating clumps that should be divided in spring or fall every four or five years. Biennials will go to seed and self sow. Most rudbeckias prefer full sun in moderately fertile, well-drained soil. They are pretty much insect and disease free.

  • More than 2,000 people came out to support the Fifth Annual Coastal Carolina Sea Turtle Day July 9 on Ocean Isle Beach.

    The Turtle Day celebrations at Ocean Isle Beach Community Center kicked off with turtle-oriented arts and crafts and games. Volunteers sold hot dogs, chips and cookies, and all the proceeds went to The Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center of Topsail Beach.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December

  • NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, S.C.—Hungry for a little food and folly?

    Dive into dinner, then delve into a murder mystery.

    It’s an extra course of the meal thrown in every week at the House of Blues’ Murder Mystery Dinner Theatre.

    Described as an interactive “whodunit” dinner show, the fun begins while feasting mystery-solvers are enjoying their dinner—a murder that soon makes everyone a suspect.

  • The Benedict Foundation of Southport will sponsor a Christmas in July Holiday Tablescape Workshop from 2-4 p.m. Thursday, July 24, at the Foundation’s conference center at 1013 E. Moore St., Southport.

    This is a special free workshop for hostesses, sponsors, and other interested participants in the Foundation’s “Setting a Christmas Table” holiday tablescape show scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 29.

  • Warm season grasses are now going “full steam ahead” and you should care for them likewise. Seed, sprig, plug or sod right away for best results because later plantings may not have enough time to establish properly before cold weather returns in the fall season.

    Don’t forget to fertilize, water and mow according to the various plant needs.

  • Glyphosate is one of the great weed control success stories of the last 50 years. More commonly known as Roundup, this material revolutionized the way we approach weed control in the landscape and garden as well as in agriculture. And, it’s safe for critters, humans and the environment because it attacks a protein synthesis chain that animals don’t have and breaks down quickly once it reaches the soil.

  • Azalea Lace Bug

    These true bugs have lace-like wings and backs. They are found on the undersides of leaves, but cause a blotched or spotted appearance on the upper leaf surface. Black varnish excrement spots appear on the underside of leaves and are characteristic even when adults are absent.

    Severely infested leaves may yellow and drop prematurely.

  • They walked through ornate gardens, saw rolling pastures where sheep and horses roamed and visited centuries-old churches. Every day, they dined on tea with scones, jam and heavy cream with the locals and learned about their traditions.

    Their recent trip to Taunton in Somerset County, England, was a once-in-a-lifetime experience for George Wong-Chong and Mari-Lou Wong-Chong of Holden Beach, mainly because it wasn’t a typical sightseeing excursion.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December

  • Kids ran through Ripley's Aquarium in Myrtle Beach trying to get a fish or a lobster or even a shark. But these sea creatures weren’t real—they were plush. They were being raffled off every 15 minutes from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. for the national launch of Sea Pals, a new product by Applause from Russ.

    More than 1,000 children and their parents participated in the launch Sea Pals are sea-themed finger puppets that have an online code that allows the consumer to access a Web site and create a virtual aquarium for their sea creature.

  • Grab your camera and dive into the North Carolina Aquariums’ photo contest. The annual competition for amateur and non-professional photographers puts the focus on the state’s diverse aquatic life.

    Images from the waters off North Carolina’s coast or within the state’s freshwater system can be entered in “Underwater Open” or “Underwater Close-ups,” depending on the scene depicted. Don’t do the deep sea? Stay high and dry while snapping shots for the “Aquatic Life in the Aquariums” category.

  • Tomatoes are a favorite of America’s home gardeners. They taste great and also are good for you. What a perfect food. No fat and lots of vitamins C and A. Tomatoes were once known as “love apples” because they were thought to be an aphrodisiac, but at my age, that would be a terrible waste of a juicy, red tomato fresh-picked from the garden.

  • One of the fun things about gardening is that it’s never the same from one year to the next. There are always things that work really well and others that just don’t turn out the way we expected. Here’s my mid-summer update on some of the good and bad in my garden this year:

  • Questions are coming in from gardeners concerned about weeds in their landscape, bugs in their bushes and diseases creeping up on garden plants.

    This is a time when plants are maximizing all their growth processes and this can put the plants under stress due to the heat and drought we are still facing.

    Because the heat wave is upon us, be careful when you are outside in this kind of weather. Take frequent breaks and replenish lost liquids as you work. We want you to enjoy your garden and not end up in the hospital.

    Here are a few things to do and to be looking for:

  • CALABASH—Even before recycling was the order of the day in Brunswick County, you would find it at Calabash VFW Post 7288.

    The reason was simple.

    Soda and beverage cans were abundant after a week at the post, so why waste them?

    Back in 1985, James “Sarge” Brosius figured out it would help the post realize whatever cash it could from recycling the aluminum containers.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Every first Friday through December