.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information, call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999 or visit www.cameronartmuseum.com.

    Ongoing through May 9

  • Sunset River Marketplace art gallery in Calabash, is featuring works in pastel by Kevin Beck through May 9. Beck is a contemporary artist living in Blowing Rock.

    Known for the vibrancy and resonance of his palette, this well-known colorist sees and interprets the landscape in shades of teal, chartreuse and berry. Viewers are transfixed by the depth and translucence of his work both in pastel and oil.

  • The next step after developing a landscape plan and selecting the recommended plants adaptive to your area is to buy good quality plants free from insects and diseases. Be sure to inspect them thoroughly because if you don’t already have a problem in the landscape then you certainly don’t want to introduce one at this stage in the landscape process.

    People think plants can take care of themselves but giving them the best chance to survive and do well starts with the selection process and buying good quality plants.

  • Transplants from other parts of the world already know it is a requirement you include evergreen azaleas in your landscape. Shirk this responsibility and the azalea police will be on your case faster than a Garden-stater can utter “youse guys.” In an effort to help you avoid this unpleasantness, here are some tips on growing azaleas along with some varieties to consider.

  • The next two articles will attempt to answer questions that seem to be asked every spring. Hopefully, the two will prove helpful to our local residents.

    As soon as the weather turns warm, the lawn questions start. One of the most frequent concerns of gardeners this time of year is a “dead spot” in the lawn. Patches of dead grass in spring are common, can be caused by several factors and are very difficult to diagnosis correctly. Extensive grass loss through the winter is usually caused by something that happened several months ago.

  • CALABASH—Lois Wilkinson brakes for plants, especially those she saw for sale at Carolyn’s Flowers on Persimmon Road last week.

    “I just heard about this place,” Wilkinson said, browsing the latest spring array of potted flowers and plants Calabash native Carolyn Schreiber has cultivated to sell for another season at the roadside stand in front of her house.

    “I need flowers that need a lot of sun,” Wilkinson said as Schreiber, a natural-born gardener, assisted her.

  • HOLDEN BEACH—It’s that time of year again for spring festivities, a bopple race, and an age-old question by newcomers, “What the heck is a bopple?”

    It’s the high-point event of Days at the Docks, Holden Beach’s annual salute-to-spring festival scheduled for this Saturday and Sunday under and around the Brunswick Island town’s high-rise bridge.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturday. Exhibit renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999.

    Ongoing through May 9

  • Seems like the ticks are trying to take over the world (at least the Brunswick County portion). If you stay outside much, these pests seem to be everywhere.

    The Extension agents are reporting what seems to be an inordinate amount of these obnoxious little creatures awaiting a meal, and that meal may be you! The Master Gardener Hotline has received calls concerning ticks. Homeowners with natural landscapes will normally have more of a problem than others.

  • Small gardens often must rely on fencing to provide privacy. We don’t have enough room to plant large evergreens that grow wide and take up the limited space, but plain fencing doesn’t make any gardener’s heart skip a beat. To solve this problem, consider vines for foliage, flowers and a welcome softening of the stark fencing.

    Wisterias have a horrible reputation for swallowing everything in their path. For the ones from China and Japan, it is well deserved, but the American wisterias aren’t nearly as invasive.

  • There are numerous ideas and misconceptions about what constitutes good topsoil. Some gardeners have the idea any and all material sold and marketed as topsoil has some magical ability to grow plants. Once unloaded off the truck and graded out, the true characteristics begin to appear...clods, rocks, cans, plastic bottles and roots. You also can receive numerous exotic weed seed.

  • Ocean Isle Beach may have its own George Clooney in the making, although this up-and-coming movie actor is not interested in being a major player on the Hollywood scene.

    He says he has a higher calling.

    People who attend the musical dramas at Ocean View Baptist Church are familiar with 25-year-old Adam Melton. He’s played the role of the risen Jesus in the Easter performances for several years and various parts in the Christmas musicals directed by his father, Larry Melton, the church’s music director.

  • A crowd of more than 400 turned out to honor Walter Harvest “Harvey” Robinson at his 100th birthday party and dinner Saturday, April 5, at Bolivia Elementary School.

    The Supply centenarian, also known through the years as Granddaddy, Uncle Harvey and Pops, was accompanied by his wife of 17 years, Eva, who’s 85.

    The event also paid tribute to Robinson’s late, first wife, Rosie Mae Hankins-Robinson, to whom he was married 54 years, his three children and eight step-children and their spouses.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild Exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, 6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday–Friday and 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday. Artwork available for sale. Exhibit is renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999.

    Ongoing through May 10

  • Now we should be out of the woods as far as frosts and freezes go. It’s time to think about adding some high impact annual color in the landscape.

    Before we get too deep into what to plant, you need to do some prep work. Most annuals need good soils. What’s a good soil? That means high organic matter, high fertility and good drainage.

  • March usually brings the first sightings of carpenter bees in north Florida. While they do resemble the well-known bumblebee, they differ in appearance and behavior.

    Carpenter bees are large and robust. The upper surface of their abdomen is bare and shiny black. Bumblebees have a hairy abdomen with at least some yellow markings.

  • For Oak Island residents and vacationing birders alike, the island offers a number of good sites for finding and photographing birds.

    Ocean, dune, estuarine, salt marsh and maritime forest habitats host a wide variety of birds—and a mix of species that slowly but continually changes as seasons change—sometimes almost weekly.

    Fall migration and winter offer the most exciting experiences; however, spring and summer offer the return of special breeding birds like painted buntings.

  • Daisy, an 8-month-old walker hound, peered through the bars of her cage, welcoming the touch and kindness of any human hand that reached out to her.

    “She was turned in by her owner because she doesn’t hunt,” said Richard Cooper, director of Brunswick County Animal Services, as he walked past noisy rows of barking, homeless dogs at the shelter on Green Swamp Road.

    He also told about a mother dog and her litter of 13 puppies that were recently brought to the shelter.

  • He was bred to fight bears, mountain lions and wolves, yet this 135-pound gentle giant is teaching children how to be safe around dogs of all shapes and sizes.

    Tagged as “The Traveling Dog,” Amadeus has been to 42 states, teaching children how to be safe around dogs.

    On Wednesday, April 23, the Ocean Isle Beach dog will visit children at Virginia Williamson Elementary School in Bolivia.

  • Ongoing

    Oak Island Art Guild exhibit, Oak Island Recreation Center, 3001 Oak Island Drive, Monday–Friday 6:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Artwork available for sale. Exhibit is renewed every 60 days. For more information call exhibit coordinator Miriam Pinkerton at 278-5562.

    Ongoing through Aug. 3

    Robert Delford Brown, “Meat, Maps and Militant Metaphysics,” Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington. This is the artist’s first solo museum exhibition. For more information, call 395-5999.

    Ongoing through May 10