.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • According to the American Pet Care Products Association, people are expected to spend more than $58 billion on their pets this year alone. And regardless of whether they are millionaires or living on the street, most people these days treat their pets as members of the family.

    People were not as educated about spaying or neutering their pets as they are now. They did not understand that not only did it spare their four-legged friends from life-threatening illnesses and improve their quality of life, but it also reduced the number of strays who become homeless nuisances.

  • Consider how life could be without the freedom we enjoy as Americans.

    We know citizens in North Korea, for example, live under a totalitarian regime that deliberately keeps them ignorant of world affairs. Many of us have read about Meriam Yehya Ibrahim, the pregnant woman sentenced to death in Sudanese court for renouncing Islam. Fewer of us may know that Buddhist extremists are driving Rohingya Muslims out of Myanmar with threats and acts of violence.

  • While Wilmington serves as the setting for most of the movie and television productions in North Carolina, several cross the New Hanover County border and make their way into our community.

  • All seems forgiven between West Brunswick High School Principal Brock Ahrens and Brunswick County Schools Superintendent Edward Pruden.

    Ahrens rescinded his resignation at Pruden’s request in a choreographed scene during commencement exercises Saturday, June 14, that bore little resemblance to the meeting before the West Brunswick High faculty and staff less than 24 hours earlier.

  • Last month, a bill was introduced in the General Assembly to ensure public records laws that apply to the state’s public schools include charter schools.

    Last week, that proposed bill was altered in the Senate education committee to “remove the provision that the charter school and its board of directors are subject to public records and open meetings laws.”

  • We in Brunswick County pride ourselves on the tranquility of our beaches, which are the destinations of so many every summer. In fact, our tourism development authority’s marketing slogan touts our community as offering “more beach for your blanket.”

    The prospect of enjoying peace, calm and quiet along the shore is what draws most people to our area every season.

    And yet we are holding our collective breaths that this summer proves to be far less eventful than last when four people lost their lives in rip currents in less than 36 hours.

  • Memorial Day weekend has come and gone, and despite what the calendar shows, summer is under way in Brunswick County.

    That means balmy weather, lots of recreational activities and festivals for residents and vacationers — and the return of a huge increase in traffic on our roadways as visitors flock to our community.

    Careless and impaired drivers are hazards at any time of year, but odds are their numbers will increase exponentially based on the sheer number of motorists in our area at this time of year.

  • What was intended to be an adjustment to improve student performance and maintain efficiency turned into a scheduling debacle for Brunswick County Schools for a third consecutive year.

  • On Friday, May 9, Brunswick Community College Board of Trustees Chairman John Jones likened life as a college graduate to riding the waves of the ocean.

    We think the same analogy applies to high school graduates, as students from West, North and South Brunswick high schools prepare for that transition this time next month.

  • Anytime student athletes step onto a field, a court or a track, they place themselves at risk.

    With all the benefits sports provide — such as the reinforcement of the values of discipline, teamwork, leadership and responsibility, the development of confidence and serving as an outlet for their energy — the potential for injury always exists.

  • The day of the 2014 primary election, Tuesday, May 6, is almost upon us, but voting is already under way for six contested seats and an advisory referendum on a proposed quarter-cent Brunswick County sales and use tax.

    The purpose of the primary is to nominate a candidate to represent a political party in the Nov. 4 general election.

  • The relatively young Brunswick County town of Leland is experiencing a growth spurt, as reflected in the many building projects under way.

    Town staff and police are in the process of moving into a wing of the long-awaited new town hall.

    An 18,000-square-foot building that sits off U.S. 17, at 1212 Magnolia Village Way, is being transformed into a highly anticipated cultural arts center. Plans are being finalized for a much-needed new senior center. And work has begun to create the first public water access at Sturgeon Creek Park.

  • On Thursday, a jury of 53-year-old Richard Hugh Grissett’s Brunswick County peers convicted him of first-degree murder and other charges related to the Nov. 12, 2012, slaying of 86-year-old Linnie Mae Ward.

    Under state law, Judge Wayland Sermons had no choice but to order Grissett to spend the rest of his life in prison with no possibility of being released.

  • Just when you think controversies in the southwest end of Brunswick County have come to an end, or at least quieted down, another one is raised — this time, on a flagpole.

    Less than a handful of Beacon readers have called and commented — under condition of anonymity, naturally — about the Chinese flag now flying at Sea Trail in Sunset Beach. All of the calls and comments have been negative.

  • While spring has been slow to start here in Brunswick County, as it has been elsewhere in the state and country, the telltale sign of its arrival has been proclaimed not just by the yellowish-green haze on vehicles, but also by the sniffles of allergy sufferers.

    Allergy experts told Time magazine the record-setting snowfall in some regions and the lingering below-freezing temperatures could mean a late flowering for trees. A quick look anywhere in our community shows this to be the case.

  • By the time many readers see this editorial, Sunset Beach officials, dignitaries and residents will have gathered to seal a time capsule commemorating the town’s 50th anniversary.

  • Most public information is filed away, but all of it should be easy to find and see. Ultimately, the information you want and require should be close at hand — especially because it belongs to you.

  • Students at Brunswick Community College often worry whether their credits will transfer to a four-year university within the University of North Carolina system.

    They will not have to worry about that this fall, as the State Board of Community Colleges and the UNC Board of Governors revised an agreement between the two systems, making college transfer options more defined and easier to follow for prospective transfer students.

  • Come September, Calabash will be the site of the Lions Club’s Oktoberfest. The event, planned for Sept. 20, will feature music, a beer tent, people and food. During their Feb. 13 meeting, the town board of commissioners agreed the town could assist with the club’s needs like tables, a stage and donated maintenance time.

    The event promises to be a good time in the town, but it belongs to the club, not the town.

    We think it is time Calabash had a festival to call its own, and a proposed seafood festival is a splendid idea.

  • Law enforcement and public safety personnel, such as firefighters and emergency medical technicians, often serve as our first line of defense in any crisis.