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Opinion

  • During the past two months, residents in Carolina Shores have rallied to defend town recycling center employee Jerry Franklin,who they feel is being treated like trash.

    The residents say it all started when Franklin received a reprimand from town maintenance supervisor Tom Donlon based on a single complaint: Someone told Donlon that Franklin failed to provide proper assistance at the recycling center.Now, they say, Franklin is no longer allowed to assist residents with their garbage and anyone who needs assistance must alert him by pointing at their bag of garbage.

  • Some Brunswick County animal advocates did not play fair by recording a Jan. 16 meeting with state Sen. Bill Rabon and then releasing it to the public, so the Senate is taking its ball — legislation passed by the House to regulate puppy mills in the state — and going home. It is an immature reaction to the childish behavior of one of its own who also happens to be one of our own.

  • The National Weather Service forecast early last week for Brunswick County was dire. Meteorologists guaranteed a dusting of snow to cover about an inch or more of ice that would not only blanket the area, but also not thaw completely in 48 hours of mostly below-freezing temperatures, beginning Jan. 28.

  • The greater a school district’s enrollment, the more money it will receive from taxpayers for operations. This principle is apparently at the heart of a battle between Brunswick County Schools and Roger Bacon Academy, which is preparing to open its second charter school in the county this summer.

    The opening of charter schools means fewer students will be served by the public school system, but local school districts are still responsible for funding the charter schools.

  • The insurance hits just seem to keep coming for homeowners in Brunswick County.

    Thanks to the federal Biggert-Waters Flood Insurance Reform Act passed in July 2012, flood insurance premiums rose by an average of 10 percent with policy renewals after Oct. 1 last year. That was coupled with a Federal Emergency Management Agency surcharge on policies amounting to 5 percent of those premiums. North Carolina’s legislators at both the state and federal level are still trying to resolve the unintended, unreasonably expensive consequences of the Biggert-Waters Act.

  • One of the side effects few considered in the wake of last week’s polar vortex was the impact on the availability of blood.

    According to the American Red Cross, 280 blood drives across 25 states were canceled because of the snow and extreme cold. The blood drive cancellations resulted in a shortfall of nearly 8, 400 blood and platelet donations since Jan. 2.

  • One of the side effects few considered in the wake of last week’s polar vortex was the impact on the availability of blood.

    According to the American Red Cross, 280 blood drives across 25 states were canceled because of the snow and extreme cold. The blood drive cancellations resulted in a shortfall of nearly 8, 400 blood and platelet donations since Jan. 2.

  • At the start of the 2013-14 year for Brunswick County Schools, the students in 11th and 12th grade Advanced Placement courses and their parents were required to sign a syllabus that agreed to the terms of the course. “The Color Purple” was among books on the reading list, which was part of the syllabus.

    Those opposed to it seem to have forgotten or ignored this fact, and that is far more offensive than any of the questionable subject matter in the award-winning novel.

  • The end of 2013 signaled the deadline for people to make charitable contributions of cash or property in time to claim it on their next tax filings.

    The recently released 2012-2013 North Carolina Secretary of State Charitable Solicitation Licensing Division Annual Report shows charities collected $32,160,894.49 from North Carolinians as reported by professional solicitors during the 12-month period.

    The annual report does not look at all charitable and nonprofits operating in North

  • The Coastal Resources Commission in February is expected to re-examine a proposal to lift a hazard designation for Mad Inlet near Sunset Beach.
    Mad Inlet closed naturally in 1997, ending a watery separation between the Sunset Beach island and Bird Island, and is not expected to re-open, according to a news release issued Oct. 31 by the North Carolina Department of Environmental and Natural Resources.

  • The Coastal Resources Commission in February is expected to re-examine a proposal to lift a hazard designation for Mad Inlet near Sunset Beach.

    Mad Inlet closed naturally in 1997, ending a watery separation between the Sunset Beach island and Bird Island, and is not expected to re-open, according to a news release issued Oct. 31 by the North Carolina Department of Environmental and Natural Resources.

  • Eight-year-old Virginia O’Hanlon wrote a letter to the editor of New York’s Sun, and the quick response was printed as an unsigned editorial Sept. 21, 1897. The work of veteran newsman Francis Pharcellus Church has since become history’s most reprinted newspaper editorial.

  • Eight-year-old Virginia O’Hanlon wrote a letter to the editor of New York’s Sun, and the quick response was printed as an unsigned editorial Sept. 21, 1897. The work of veteran newsman Francis Pharcellus Church has since become history’s most reprinted newspaper editorial.

  • The common use of email and the Internet has made it easier than ever for people to access the information they need with minimal effort and expense. Even those who do not have a computer at home can visit the nearest library or community center to use one.

    Finding and reading the public documents you require to answer questions and conduct research often is as simple as making a few keystrokes and pressing some buttons. At least, that is how it should be.

  • Last week’s edition of the Beacon featured a story about West Brunswick High School senior Meg Fletcher, a state finalist in the Wendy’s High School Heisman Award competition. Award applicants are judged on their academic achievements, athletic accomplishments, community leadership and involvement in extracurricular activities, among other criteria. Fletcher maintains a grade point average higher than 4.0 while participating — and excelling — at many sports. She even helped institute her school’s swim team.

  • Last week’s edition of the Beacon featured a story about West Brunswick High School senior Meg Fletcher, a state finalist in the Wendy’s High School Heisman Award competition. Award applicants are judged on their academic achievements, athletic accomplishments, community leadership and involvement in extracurricular activities, among other criteria. Fletcher maintains a grade point average higher than 4.0 while participating — and excelling — at many sports. She even helped institute her school’s swim team.

  • While Brunswick County’s 50 miles of beaches along the Atlantic Ocean tend to get all the attention, the tide is beginning to turn toward the county’s rivers.

    Back in September, the Leland Tourism Development Authority held the inaugural Brunswick Waterfest to promote outdoor activities in the area’s creeks and rivers. Highlights included a kayak fishing tournament, Stand-up Paddleboard races, hikes, kayak trips and activities in and around Brunswick River Park on N.C. 133.

  • While Brunswick County’s 50 miles of beaches along the Atlantic Ocean tend to get all the attention, the tide is beginning to turn toward the county’s rivers.

    Back in September, the Leland Tourism Development Authority held the inaugural Brunswick Waterfest to promote outdoor activities in the area’s creeks and rivers. Highlights included a kayak fishing tournament, Stand-up Paddleboard races, hikes, kayak trips and activities in and around Brunswick River Park on N.C. 133.

  • Fix A Friend Spay Neuter Clinic just reached a significant milestone in its brief history by performing its 1,000th spay/neuter procedure. The reduced-cost pet surgical alteration facility at 6033 Ocean Highway East in Winnabow only opened to the public Aug. 26.

  • Fix A Friend Spay Neuter Clinic just reached a significant milestone in its brief history by performing its 1,000th spay/neuter procedure. The reduced-cost pet surgical alteration facility at 6033 Ocean Highway East in Winnabow only opened to the public Aug. 26.