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Opinion

  • From the information we’ve reviewed so far, it seems there could be some good cost savings for Brunswick County taxpayers if the county were to allow a nonprofit group to run the county’s animal shelter.

    Last week, Rescue Animals Community Effort (RACE), made a pitch to the Brunswick County Health Board to take over shelter operations. 

    Brunswick County Health Director Don Yousey has said he thinks the concept is a good plan, one that could ultimately save the county money.

  • Every single week while proofreading obituaries before the page goes to press, someone in the newsroom always says the same thing—I wish I would have gotten to know this person before he/she passed away.

  • A North Carolina House bill that has passed first reading could lead to a constitutional amendment that would further protect citizens’ rights to public information.

    House Bill 87, whose primary sponsors are Reps. Stephen A. LaRoque, R-Kinston, and Tim Moore, R-Kings Mountain, was filed earlier this month and passed first reading Monday. The bill aims to amend the state constitution to protect the public’s right to know.

  • If Brunswick County commissioner and department of social services board chair Charles Warren’s intentions are good, his actions are completely off the mark.

    He is single-handedly making a mockery out of the department of social services board and Brunswick County government.

    While Warren claims he is a champion of causes for the community, he is actually a roadblock to open and transparent government and healing and unity for the department of social services officials and employees.

    Worst of all, he can’t see he is doing anything wrong.

  • Since 2004, Brunswick County has invested millions of dollars to purchase a new emergency radio system and maintain and repair it.

    The problem is, even with all of that money dedicated to it, some of the men and women who use it regularly—emergency responders whose lives depend on it—say the system doesn’t always work.

  • In December, the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners adopted a code of conduct for county employees and a code of ethics for board members.
    The code of ethics, which was mandated counties adopt per the General Assembly, specified county commissioners should no longer serve on county boards because of possible conflicts of interest. 
    The exception to this was boards where law mandated a commissioner serve. For Brunswick County, that is the county’s board of health.

  • Brunswick County is known for its beautiful beaches. 

    In fact, these beaches play a vital role in our economy. From lodging and meals to entertainment and other services, the county’s beaches keep our economy fluid, even in difficult financial times such as these.

    Sunset Beach is now facing an issue that could alter the very fabric of beach life there. How and where will residents and beach visitors park on the island?

  • There was some concern that with the departure of state Sen. R.C. Soles Jr. and state Sen. Julia Boseman from the General Assembly in Raleigh, coastal North Carolina could get less attention in the state this year.

    But if Bill Rabon’s public reception and freshman leadership role are any indication of how his first term in office is going to evolve, then it looks as though we may be just fine.

    Rabon is replacing a longtime senator, and the seat is switching from Democrat to Republican. He will have a tough job ahead of him.

  • On Thursday, the community is invited to come to Brunswick Community College and share thoughts and feedback about qualities and characteristics for the college’s next president.

    Stephen Greiner, who has led the college since summer 2005, has left to become the new president and CEO of Hazard Community and Technical College in Kentucky.

    Brunswick County and BCC are different than they were when Greiner took the helm five years ago. The college’s new leader will have a new set of challenges and goals.

  • It’s becoming a matter of who said what when it comes to the county’s emergency radio system.

    Recently, the Calabash Fire Department Board of Directors drafted a letter to county commissioners saying members believe Brunswick County Emergency Services Director Anthony Marzano owes firefighters an apology for statements he made about how they used emergency radios during a recent restaurant fire.

    Marzano says he hasn’t yet seen the letter and can’t directly respond to it.

  • For the past 20 years, Rex Gore has faithfully served the citizens of Brunswick, Columbus and Bladen counties as district attorney.

    It’s a job that doesn’t come without a lot of criticism or controversy. When you’re the man leading a team that’s working to send people to jail, the reality is it’s unlikely you’re making a whole lot of friends.

    But Gore handled the position with professionalism, and many crime victims from the area will tell you he also did it with compassion and sensitivity.

  • Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus

    Eight-year-old Virginia O’Hanlon wrote a letter to the editor of New York’s Sun, and the quick response was printed as an unsigned editorial Sept. 21, 1897. The work of veteran newsman Francis Pharcellus Church has since become history’s most reprinted newspaper editorial, appearing in part or whole in dozens of languages in books, movies, and other editorials, and on posters and stamps.

    “Dear Editor: I am 8 years old.

  • Although they’re not exactly where we think they should be, Department of Veterans Affairs officials seem to be more on track regarding needs of Brunswick County’s veterans.

    Last week, VA officials announced they were going to scrap the idea of outsourcing veterans’ medical treatment at an area doctor’s office and instead were looking to move forward with a veterans’ clinic here.

  • Brunswick County Commissioner Charles Warren, we don’t think you’re being a friend of open government.

    We’ve had a lot of questions in the last several months about the transparency involving operations of the Brunswick County Department of Social Services Board.

    We’ve questioned decisions about closed sessions, and we’ve been apprehensive about how hush-hush the board has been on the investigation into former director Jamie Orrock.

  • The holiday shopping season is here and many Brunswick County residents who are feeling the crunch from a difficult economy are looking for gift deals.

    If you’re out shopping this season, do your best to try to shop right here at home. Brunswick County has plenty of small business owners who offer everything from unique clothing and accessories to home goods, furniture, electronics and more.

  • This past Sunday, a 20-year-old Bolivia man was killed in a single-vehicle wreck on N.C. 133 near Belville.

    Investigators believe high speed, failure to use seat belts and alcohol are all factors that may have contributed to the wreck that killed Anthony Burgess. 

    The driver, Efird Johnson, 26, of Bolivia, now faces criminal charges.

    While families across this community plan to celebrate the holiday season, it will be a time of mourning and sadness for the families and friends of these two young men.

  • Although some people may think the giving season begins the day after Thanksgiving, right here in Brunswick County volunteers show it’s giving season all year long.

    Last week some of those dedicated volunteers were honored by Jayne Mathews and the Brunswick County Volunteer Center for their selfless dedication to this community.

  • Everyone knows the economy has been tough. 

    While citizens have struggled with everything from job losses to high unemployment, there may be no other time when these financial losses are as evident as during the holidays.

    On Monday, the last day Brunswick Family Assistance accepted applications for its holiday assistance, about 100 people stopped by to sign up for help.

    That’s one day.

    That’s one charity.

  • The town of Shallotte has some good news to share—several businesses are relocating or expanding within town limits.

    In a challenging economy such as this, it’s great to see new businesses opening, especially when for far too long we have seen too many small businesses close.

    The news there will be more food and shopping choices in Brunswick County is something to be celebrated. Now, it’s time for Brunswick County citizens to help continue with this success.

  • Congratulations to Vicky Snyder, principal of Brunswick County Early College High School.

    Last week Snyder was among some of the best school administrators in Brunswick County nominated for the district’s Principal of the Year award. Snyder was named the winner.

    The award is an honor for Snyder, a longtime educator who has dedicated her life to teaching young people. The key to her success may be that she believes in an education team and sees the school where she works as an extension of her family.