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Opinion

  • This weekend the Winnabow Volunteer Fire Department will celebrate 50 years of service to Brunswick County.

    It is an important milestone for a giving group of volunteers who do their best to aid citizens in need and help in times of danger.

    This weekend, fire officials will celebrate with an open house at the fire department, 161 Governor’s Road in Winnabow.

  • In a smart fiscal move, the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners has decided to hold off on a possible countywide curbside recycling initiative until next year.

    In light of the slow economy and knowing the county has already had to retighten its belt because of budget constraints, this was a wise decision for this fiscal year.However, as Brunswick County continues to grow and its options for traditional landfill locations dwindle, it only makes sense that in the near future officials will have to tackle this endeavor.

  • Congressman Mike McIntyre, what is it exactly you’re so excited about?

    Last week you touted the new veterans services “clinic” coming to Brunswick County. You called it a “great victory for the many veterans who live in Brunswick County.”

    We’re not sure what battle you’ve been fighting, but from our perspective, we can’t see a contracted primary care physician available only three days a week for local veterans as much of a victory.

  • Monday night, the North Carolina Senate passed a bill that would outlaw video gaming entertainment. 

    If the same measure were to be approved by the state House of Representatives, it would essentially force electronic sweepstakes operations, like those which have popped up throughout Brunswick County, out of business.

  • The decision about whether terminal groins could be a viable option for coastal erosion control is now in the hands of one person, and that’s not how it should be.

    According to Ocean Isle Beach Mayor Debbie Smith and Caswell Beach Mayor Harry Simmons, N.C. Speaker of the House Joe Hackney is controlling whether Senate Bill 832 will be heard on the House floor during the General Assembly’s short session. 

  • As our roads begin to feel the increased pressure of summer tourists, the opportunity for incidents increase. We only have to look back a couple of weeks to see tragedies that have happened on our roadways before the onslaught of beachgoers even began.

    Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram has said his deputies will be stepping up their emphasis on impaired, aggressive and speeding drivers during the busy summer months.

  • What exactly is it state Sen. R.C. Soles Jr. believes he is doing?

    Surely, he can’t believe most of his constituents think he is acting in the community’s best interest with the latest bills he has introduced in the General Assembly’s “short session.”

    Remember, this is a time when he and fellow legislators are supposed to be considering only “non-controversial” bills.

  • Carolina Shores residents hoping for open, transparent government are going to be disappointed.

    Again.

    On May 3, the town board met in closed session to discuss personnel issues. When the board moved into open session, it approved having town attorney Holt Moore send a “personnel letter” to an employee. It did not indicate who the employee was or what action was taken.

  • It has been an intense four years for some Brunswick County students.

    Since 2006, students in Brunswick County’s Early College High School program have been studying their high school curriculum while at the same time exploring life in college.

    By taking college-level courses at Brunswick Community College, students have the opportunity to finish high school while earning a college-level associate’s degree—in just four years.

  • During the May primary election season, two of the more-heated and more-interesting races were for Brunswick County Sheriff and the district attorney that serves our county.

    In the Republican race for sheriff, current sheriff John Ingram was challenged by North Carolina Highway Patrol Sgt. Tim Daniels. Ingram defeated Daniels to be the Republican sheriff candidate in November.

    On the Democratic side, it was the race of the Lewises as Rendy Lewis challenged and ultimately defeated Louie Lewis for the Democratic spot on the November General Election ballot.

  • In light of a struggling economy, the reality is tough decisions are going to have to be made when local government officials put together budgets for the 2010-2011 fiscal year.

    The Brunswick County Board of Commissioners got a taste of that recently when it had its budget workshops. Officials looked at a number of ways to generate new and increased revenue and also explored possible cuts and decreases.

  • Seriously, Carolina Shores? Is this really happening again? Have town officials really let Carolina Shores’ citizens down once again?

    Unfortunately, yes.

    We understand people make mistakes, and when they do, we believe they should be given opportunities to correct them, learn from them and hopefully not make them again.

    However, we have a hard time understanding how someone as experienced and versed as Carolina Shores Town Administrator Linda Herncane could make a mistake by deleting town e-mails from her computer.

  • The Brunswick County Board of Education had a great opportunity to start anew with the hiring of a new superintendent last week, and yet somehow the announcement got flubbed up.

    When the community should have been celebrating and welcoming the district’s new leadership with Dr. Edward Pruden, there was dissent among the board.

    In a prepared statement, board member Scott Milligan said he was voting against the hiring of Pruden, not because of Pruden’s candidacy, but because of what he believed were some shady actions of some board members.

  • Veterans Affairs officials have really missed the boat on a grand opportunity right here in Brunswick County, and unfortunately it appears it is going to come at the expense of taxpayers.

    The Brunswick County Board of Commissioners has practically thrown the current Brunswick Community Hospital location at VA officials. County officials have offered to make VA officials a deal they couldn’t refuse for a new VA facility.

  • In a close vote last week, the North Carolina Coastal Resources Commission (CRC) voted 8-5 to recommend to the state General Assembly that the use of terminal groins could be feasible when used in conjunction with beach renourishment.

    That’s a step in the right direction for officials who have been pushing for terminal groins, like Ocean Isle Beach Mayor Debbie Smith.

    Now, the decision about whether terminal groins will become a possibility goes to the General Assembly.

  • Brunswick County Schools officials have some tough decisions ahead of them.

    In light of troubled economy, the district is anticipating budget cuts for the upcoming fiscal year.

    Recently, as a solution to save the district money, a proposal was presented that would remove pre-K services from the school district. It’s an effort that, if adopted, would mean some $450,000 in Title I funding could go to elementary and high schools throughout Brunswick County—each county elementary and high school could receive an additional $35,000.

  • There are problems with North Carolina’s voter registration system. In its current form, the process has too many holes, making it far too easy for those who want to take advantage of the system.

    Voter fraud is a very real problem in this country and more needs to be done—especially right here in North Carolina—to make that more difficult to happen.

  • Two rabies cases have been confirmed in Brunswick County and they’re serving as a reminder about the importance of keeping pets current on vaccinations.

    In the two cases reported by the Brunswick County Health Department, two dogs that got into fights with wild animals were not current on their rabies vaccinations. Because of that, one of the dogs was euthanized. In the other case, Brunswick County Animal Services quarantined the dog while the owner made a decision about whether it would be put down.

  • When The Brunswick Beacon updated its retirement section “Golden Sands” last year, Jim Roach was one of the first people to comment about it.

    As a matter of fact, he was so excited he showed up at the office after it published with a list of stories in hand. As a representative of the N.C. Senior Tarheel Legislature, Roach, a retiree, was enthusiastic about sharing more ideas for the section. His list was so long, he asked us if we could move from our annual production cycle and produce it more frequently, quarterly would be a good start, he encouraged.

  • It was likely a confusing and scary situation for some Shallotte Middle School parents last week when the school was placed on lockdown Feb. 18 just before the school day began.

    As buses and vehicles arrived at the school, students were turned away and sent to West Brunswick High School, where they were directed to wait in the school’s gym.

    On the morning of Feb. 18, a parent reported a student had received a threatening text message. School officials believed it was serious enough to warrant the lockdown.