.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • The law in North Carolina is clear. Public records belong to the public.

    We oppose any attempts by any public body to impose fees that would discourage access to public documents.

    We believe if the proposal before the Brunswick County Board of Education moves forward, that’s exactly what will happen.

    Last week, Brunswick County Schools’ Policy Committee discussed adopting fees for “excessive public records requests.” Board members will review this at their Dec. 1 meeting.

  • Brunswick County has a growing population of retired senior citizens.

    Although they’re not working anymore, you can be sure they have no plans to take it easy. From volunteering at schools and with church and civic organizations, to taking part in senior athletic leagues and games, Brunswick’s senior population is active and making important, positive impacts on this community.

  • Being a parent is a tough job, and it’s one that doesn’t come with an instruction manual. Parents learn by doing and drawing on their own experiences and from those around them. Many look for positive role models to help them along the way.

    That’s why programs like the Communities in Schools Parenting Education Program are so important.

    For 12 weeks, any parent in Brunswick County can be a part of the program that uses trained facilitators to work with parents and children. They focus on parenting, life and family skills.

  • In this difficult economy, when many Brunswick Countians are unemployed or facing reduced work hours and pay cuts, it can be difficult to find affordable medical care.

    That’s why free clinics, like New Hope and Brunswick Adult Medical Clinic, are so important.

    Last week, volunteers and officials with New Hope Clinic broke ground on a new, much-needed, larger facility. It’s a move required after the clinic has experienced an increase in the number of people who need its services.

  • When Brunswick County Schools Superintendent Katie McGee first met Bob Grimes, he left a lasting impression, she recalled.

    Since then, Grimes appears to be leaving an impression on just about everyone he meets, including his peers in the school district.

    Friday, Grimes, the North Brunswick High School principal, was named Brunswick County’s Principal of the Year.

    Grimes was bestowed the honor for a number of achievements, including leading NBHS from being a school in turnaround status to one that had the largest increase in proficiencies for 2008-2009.

  • Those who knew Carl Bazemore say he was a quiet man who got along well with others. He is noted for his public service, particularly to Sunset Beach where he served for 12 years on Sunset Beach Town Council.

    In addition to maintaining a council seat for three terms, Bazemore also served on the Brunswick Beaches Consortium and was a chair of the South Brunswick Water and Sewer Authority’s stormwater management program.

  • It’s been a difficult year for some Brunswick County residents. As the economy has suffered, many people have found themselves with reduced hours or out of work altogether.

    In Brunswick County, the unemployment rate was at 10.5 percent in September, relatively unchanged from August’s rate of 10.6 percent.

    Funding for a state program, however, is helping to breathe new life into job searches and skill creation.

  • There is a battle ongoing this election season in Carolina Shores.

    Problem is, one of the contenders being pulled into the ring isn’t even up for re-election.

    In recent months, Carolina Shores commissioner Gere Dale has made it clear he has a real problem with the way mayor Stephen Selby does town business.

  • All politics are local. It’s an old saying, but very true. Next Tuesday, residents of the 19 Brunswick County municipalities will have their opportunity to cast their votes for who will lead their communities.

    The people throwing their hats in the ring do so for various reasons. Hopefully by now, you have had a chance to meet candidates in your community and find out their thoughts on issues important to you. If not, you still have a little time remaining.

  • Brunswick County Schools Superintendent Katie McGee’s tenure has been a mix of accomplishments and contention.

    Under McGee’s leadership, dropout rates have been reduced, test scores have gone up and facilities have been constructed and improved.

    But unfortunately, many of the district’s accomplishments have been overshadowed by controversy.

  • Many residents have been wondering what will happen to the current Brunswick Community Hospital site once it relocates to its new facility next year.

    Brunswick County Commissioners have an idea—they’d like to see the site used as a Veterans Affairs facility. Recently commissioners committed to working with state and federal agencies to see if this concept can become a reality.

  • When we heard last week a Brunswick County Detention Center officer had released the wrong inmate from jail, we wanted to know how that could happen.

    Brunswick County Sheriff John Ingram had an answer. It was “careless,” he said, not an “accident.”

    Detention officer Jamie Lynn Jenrette released Rosher Rodriquez-Aguilar, 27, without properly checking his photo and identifying armband, Ingram said. The mistake ultimately cost Jenrette her job, indicating what appears to be a zero-tolerance policy for such behavior by the sheriff’s office.

  • We’ve said it before, and we’ll continue to say it until elected and government officials in Brunswick County clearly get the message—doing public business out of the public eye is wrong and violates the spirit of open meetings and public records laws.

    Last week, we took Carolina Shores commissioners to task about seeking a consensus on a public matter through e-mail, only to turn around and find out Brunswick County Board of Education members have done the same.

  • Gere Dale, does the town of Carolina Shores have something to hide?

    Why is it you’re expending so much energy to keep public business behind closed, locked doors?

    On multiple occasions, when approached by a Beacon reporter about issues we believe are of public record, you have spent more time questioning the reporter’s sources than answering questions.

  • Charles Warren is right, sometimes you have to take drastic actions, but his proposal to freeze school board funding is just plain wrong.

    Last week at the Brunswick County Commissioners meeting, Warren proposed county commissioners freeze school funding until the Brunswick County Board of Education “gets their act together.”

  • In a country founded on principles of freedom—including the freedom to choose—it makes sense that Brunswick County Schools administration has offered parents a choice regarding student viewing of the president’s recent educational message.

    On Tuesday, President Barack Obama delivered a message to the nation. The message was directed toward school children and many schools across the country allowed students to view it as it aired lived.

  • If even some of the claims made by Brunswick County Schools former central office employee Sherry Dove are true, Brunswick Board of Education members should be concerned.

    Among the many assertions made in the lawsuit against the district, including claims that Superintendent Katie McGee may have treated an employee improperly, is the claim the board gave Dove only one hour of a nine-hour closed session grievance hearing to present her side of the case.

  • On Tuesday, children of all ages headed back to school in Brunswick County. It was a time of tears for some parents who sent their little ones off to classes for the first time, while others celebrated the end of summer and the return to the classroom.

    Throughout the community, Brunswick County educators and their support staff have a lot of hard work to do. State and national test scores keep them busy, but they must also focus their attention on molding and mentoring each and every child they encounter.

  • Friday night will be a big night for Brunswick County, most specifically Brunswick Community College.

    Beginning at 6 p.m., activities will kick off to celebrate the second annual “Dancing with the Brunswick County Stars.”

    The event raises money for scholarships for Brunswick Community College students and will feature dancers from the community along with their talented, professional dance partners. Many have been preparing for this event for months.

  • Brunswick County government made a good step toward operating as an open and transparent government when it decided to install a computer terminal at the county complex where government e-mails can be accessed by the public.

    The public e-mail computer terminal is in the lobby of Building I at the county government complex in Bolivia. Business hours are 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

    By using the computer, citizens can have access to correspondence that takes place within the county’s e-mail system.