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Opinion

  • To the editor: I want to thank some special people in the community.

    On Jan. 3, my husband Jim and my daughter Jaimee Lynn were in a terrible accident at the curve on Thomasboro Road just before U.S. 17. My husband’s car rolled over three times and they landed upside down across the ditch.

    A family named Hoover helped my daughter to safety and applied pressure to her laceration on her head.

  • To the editor: This is one of the few letters that is not registering a complaint.

    I live with my little four-legged companion in a modest old house on Ocean Isle Beach, and I’m so content I plan to live out my days here if insurance and/or taxes don’t force me to move off the island.

    When I crest the bridge, I feel like I’ve entered a little corner of heaven. I’m a happy lady. I have five children with families in and around North Carolina whom I adore, lots of friends I appreciate and love, which leads to the reason for this letter.

  • Recently, the Brunswick County Board of Commissioners decided it would join other coastal county officials in a fight against newly approved homeowners’ insurance rates.

  • There are things I am just not good at keeping.

    In the past year and a half, I have gone through eight cell phones. Don’t ask me how; let’s just say that the extra $3.99 a month for the insurance is well worth it.

    I have to buy a new Chapstick at least once every two weeks. For some reason, my dog has an internal Chapstick detector and can fish it out of my purse, even when it’s zipped in an inside pocket.

    But most recently, I have had a battle with any and every umbrella that has come my way.

  • As a newspaper person with more than 10 years of writing under my belt—and a lifetime of passion for writing before that—it would be easy to assume I’m quite a reader. Toss in the fact my mother was rarely spotted anywhere without a book in hand, and it would be simple to peg me as a bookworm.

    But somehow, unlike other writers I know, the bug to read, the obsession to peruse everything literary, somehow escaped me. I’ll blame it partly on rebellion—mom always had a book in tow, so I never wanted one.

  • “We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.”

    —Winston Churchill

    Even in tough times, people find ways to give back. Dealing with difficult times makes us realize the importance of helping others.

    During the holiday season, many charities saw more people pulling together to donate what they could to make things better for those in need. But the need doesn’t stop once the holidays are over.

  • With a $32 million high-rise bridge rising taller in the west, in less than two years the Sunset Beach pontoon bridge will finally get to do something it’s been trying to do for decades—retire and die with dignity.

    We’ll no longer take for granted the photographs and renderings of the half-century-old span lining local walls—scenic in art-show paintings, snow-covered in a fluke weather-year picture at Sunset Beach Town Hall, hot with beach traffic in summer and quiet at Christmastime.

  • To the editor: I was so dismayed to see the picture of the beautiful bobcat killed by Mr. Faircloth. I don’t see the point of killing that animal. They are rare in these parts.

    I hope you are proud of yourself, Mr. Faircloth, because I certainly am not. I would love to see such a beautiful animal out in the wild, and I would have shot it too, with a camera.

     

  • To the editor: On Dec. 27, I attended a celebration of life for my dear friend Mildred Mercer, a cornerstone of the history of Bolivia. I thought about how she had influenced my life since I was a child and the lives of so many who knew her.

    If you needed to know anything about Brunswick County history, you could go to Mildred or Ernestine Mercer in the heart of Bolivia.

    They were always the caretakers of so many wonderful stories about the people, the history of Bolivia and the surrounding area.

  • To the editor: To the Washington bureaucrats: 1) If you really want to jump-start the economy, give that remaining money back to the taxpayers, the ones who put it there to begin with. If you politicians really want to give money to jump-start the economy, do this math equation: $350 billion divided by 250 million taxpaying Americans and you get $1,400 per taxpayer, more if there are fewer taxpayers.

  • To the editor: I would like to thank Mr. Norvell B. DeAtkine for writing and The Brunswick Beacon editor for publishing the amazingly factual and informative letter in the Jan. 1 edition of the Beacon regarding our society being socialized.

     

  • To the editor: I have noticed that Mr. Stocker, who lives in Gastonia, has a lot of time to write about problems down at the coast. Evidently he does not have time to properly assess a situation before he writes his letters.

    Who should pay for the billions of dollars in damages tornadoes create that could happen, even in Gastonia? It seems we all pay for them, as this is the way insurance should work.

  • To the editor: June Simpson is fighting for her life. This devoted wife, mother and grandmother began experiencing severe asthma attacks 15 years ago. She was diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis in 2006. June’s health has steadily declined since her diagnosis. Doctors say her only hope for a second chance at life is a double-lung transplant.

  • As Brunswick County continues to grow and its population continues to increase, so does its need for more quality, affordable health services.

    Many residents are anxiously awaiting the completion of Brunswick County’s newest hospital—the facility that will replace the current Brunswick Community Hospital. Slated to be completed in 2010, the new hospital will encompass 252,604 square feet, with an additional 75,000 square feet of future medical office space. The $107 million hospital will have 74 acute-care beds, four observation beds and five operating rooms.

  • To the editor: This letter is to inform people what is happening to homeowners on Ocean Isle Beach.

    I purchased a home in 2001 on Ocean Isle Beach that is 1,500 square feet. The estimated cost to replace my home is $150,000.

    My taxes are now $2,392 per year. The insurance on my home is $6,908 per year. This is $775 per month for taxes and insurance on this $150,000 home. I will pay more $150,000 in insurance in 21 years, more than enough to completely replace my home.

    Something is not right here!

  • Growing up in central Kentucky, I’m used to winter’s cold temperatures, snow, wind, rain and ice. Although it’s nothing compared to many northern states, Kentucky has plenty of below-freezing days during winter months.

  • This is the beginning of a new year. It is time to release the past and look toward the future. It is important not to allow past failures and disappointments to hinder future success. Rather than reflect on what has gone wrong with our economy in the past, we need to reflect on what can go right with our economy in the future.

    The Apostle Paul says in the fourth chapter of Philippians, “think on those things that are true, honest and just.”

  • To the editor: An open letter to cruise lines: In our fast-forward, intelligent society, I see a need for brainstorming when it comes to room balconies and outer deck railings on cruise ships.

  • A business-as-usual county commissioners’ meeting on Monday night turned animated when commissioners considered a cell phone stipend plan, which almost cost county department heads their BlackBerrys.

  • If I had a nickel for every cell phone, iPod or BlackBerry given this Christmas, I could retire early.

    I am not one of those people opposed to technology. In fact, I had several of the latest tech gadgets on my Christmas list. Technology is great—but lately I have been wondering how it’s affecting our society. Do we as a society interact less because it is more convenient to whip out our cell phone and text?