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Opinion

  • To the editor: I was so dismayed to see the picture of the beautiful bobcat killed by Mr. Faircloth. I don’t see the point of killing that animal. They are rare in these parts.

    I hope you are proud of yourself, Mr. Faircloth, because I certainly am not. I would love to see such a beautiful animal out in the wild, and I would have shot it too, with a camera.

     

  • To the editor: On Dec. 27, I attended a celebration of life for my dear friend Mildred Mercer, a cornerstone of the history of Bolivia. I thought about how she had influenced my life since I was a child and the lives of so many who knew her.

    If you needed to know anything about Brunswick County history, you could go to Mildred or Ernestine Mercer in the heart of Bolivia.

    They were always the caretakers of so many wonderful stories about the people, the history of Bolivia and the surrounding area.

  • To the editor: To the Washington bureaucrats: 1) If you really want to jump-start the economy, give that remaining money back to the taxpayers, the ones who put it there to begin with. If you politicians really want to give money to jump-start the economy, do this math equation: $350 billion divided by 250 million taxpaying Americans and you get $1,400 per taxpayer, more if there are fewer taxpayers.

  • To the editor: I would like to thank Mr. Norvell B. DeAtkine for writing and The Brunswick Beacon editor for publishing the amazingly factual and informative letter in the Jan. 1 edition of the Beacon regarding our society being socialized.

     

  • To the editor: I have noticed that Mr. Stocker, who lives in Gastonia, has a lot of time to write about problems down at the coast. Evidently he does not have time to properly assess a situation before he writes his letters.

    Who should pay for the billions of dollars in damages tornadoes create that could happen, even in Gastonia? It seems we all pay for them, as this is the way insurance should work.

  • To the editor: June Simpson is fighting for her life. This devoted wife, mother and grandmother began experiencing severe asthma attacks 15 years ago. She was diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and pulmonary fibrosis in 2006. June’s health has steadily declined since her diagnosis. Doctors say her only hope for a second chance at life is a double-lung transplant.

  • As Brunswick County continues to grow and its population continues to increase, so does its need for more quality, affordable health services.

    Many residents are anxiously awaiting the completion of Brunswick County’s newest hospital—the facility that will replace the current Brunswick Community Hospital. Slated to be completed in 2010, the new hospital will encompass 252,604 square feet, with an additional 75,000 square feet of future medical office space. The $107 million hospital will have 74 acute-care beds, four observation beds and five operating rooms.

  • To the editor: This letter is to inform people what is happening to homeowners on Ocean Isle Beach.

    I purchased a home in 2001 on Ocean Isle Beach that is 1,500 square feet. The estimated cost to replace my home is $150,000.

    My taxes are now $2,392 per year. The insurance on my home is $6,908 per year. This is $775 per month for taxes and insurance on this $150,000 home. I will pay more $150,000 in insurance in 21 years, more than enough to completely replace my home.

    Something is not right here!

  • Growing up in central Kentucky, I’m used to winter’s cold temperatures, snow, wind, rain and ice. Although it’s nothing compared to many northern states, Kentucky has plenty of below-freezing days during winter months.

  • This is the beginning of a new year. It is time to release the past and look toward the future. It is important not to allow past failures and disappointments to hinder future success. Rather than reflect on what has gone wrong with our economy in the past, we need to reflect on what can go right with our economy in the future.

    The Apostle Paul says in the fourth chapter of Philippians, “think on those things that are true, honest and just.”

  • To the editor: An open letter to cruise lines: In our fast-forward, intelligent society, I see a need for brainstorming when it comes to room balconies and outer deck railings on cruise ships.

  • A business-as-usual county commissioners’ meeting on Monday night turned animated when commissioners considered a cell phone stipend plan, which almost cost county department heads their BlackBerrys.

  • If I had a nickel for every cell phone, iPod or BlackBerry given this Christmas, I could retire early.

    I am not one of those people opposed to technology. In fact, I had several of the latest tech gadgets on my Christmas list. Technology is great—but lately I have been wondering how it’s affecting our society. Do we as a society interact less because it is more convenient to whip out our cell phone and text?

  • To the editor: Welcome to the real world, Mr. Mac Harrell. Why would I, who lives 250 miles from the Atlantic Ocean and 750 miles from the Gulf of Mexico, have to subsidize insurance by higher rates for those who live along those coasts, generally in homes priced way above the median price in our area?

  • To the editor: In reply to the Shutt letter in the Jan. 1 edition of the Beacon, he blames all the storms and economic meltdown on us for not giving more support to the Israelis; in other words, God is punishing us.

    God may be punishing us but it would be for supporting them. The people who are in Palestine today are not real Israelites. They are political Zionist Khazars.

    The Bible says God chose Israel to be his servant people, not to steal land and kill at least 100,000 people, but to spread the gospel of Christ throughout the world.

  • To the editor: I want to take time to acknowledge a few hardworking folks who work on the other side of the counter at about any pharmacy you choose to take your business to.

    I have only occasionally been required to wait an inordinate amount of time for my pharmacy items. I know the folks back there are working hard at what they have to do. These pharmacy folks have a job that has many factors involved in it that are tightly government regulated and believe me, these regulations are there for good reasons. These regulations add to our waiting time.

  • My dear spouse Penny and I were returning Dec. 28 from the West Palm Beach, Fla., region to Shallotte via I-95. We hoped it was going to be a piece of cake.

    Instead, traffic slowed to a standstill just south of the Savannah exits. Tired at 7 p.m., we ducked into a nice inn for a good night’s rest along with other discouraged motorists.

    At 6 a.m., I dressed in the dark while Penny sacked in. I shaved and headed for the free breakfast and a newspaper in the lounge. Surely, I would be the only one up? Surprise!

  • To the editor: Were you born yesterday? No? Well, here is another question that probably is just as difficult to answer.

    If the weather disasters that are anticipated by a commission recommending home insurance rate increases fail to materialize, will the insurance companies refund to you any premium increases?

    Well, if you answered that question as you did the first, you just passed Politics As Usual 101! However, it is clear commission members and many of our legislators believe you should answer the first question with a “yes” and ignore the second.

  • To the editor: The Brunswick Beacon has been instrumental in elevating the public awareness of Brunswick Family Assistance’s financial condition as a result of the economy.

    In October, Scott Harrell (publisher) and Stacey Manning (editor) published an article demonstrating BFA’s needs. Immediately, we began receiving donations to assist our short-term requirements.

    You have helped us immensely to let the public know what Brunswick Family Assistance is about and how we assist families in dire need.

  • Laura Lewis

    It was just a little over year ago I was traipsing the streets of Calabash on a late December morning, conducting an unscientific survey of local breakfast diners willing to foresee what lay ahead in 2008.

    One year later, I can reflect it’s a good thing Calabash is renowned for its seafood, because when it comes to skilled psychics, it doesn’t have any.

    Rate of people who predicted Barack Obama would be elected president: Zero.