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Opinion

  • It only takes one person to make a change in our community. When that person gets support of family, friends and others, a good idea can quickly grow into an important project.

  • The time has never been better to get out and enjoy events and places in Brunswick County. Whether you’re a full-time resident, a part-time resident, or a vacationer, you’ll quickly see there is much to do in our community.

    While a number of businesses and entertainment groups put on some outstanding productions, some of the very best things to see and do here are events put on by a broad base of community volunteers. From theater productions and musicals to art shows and weekend festivals, from May until October, Brunswick County is hopping.

  • As Americans, we’re accustomed to waiting in lines. We wait in line to eat. We wait in line to shop. We wait in line to catch the bus and to pay our bills. In most cases, waiting in line is an everyday annoyance, something we deal with because we have to.

    But on Tuesday, many Brunswick County residents found a good reason to stand in line—for a chance to vote in this year’s primary election.

  • Congratulations go out to all the Brunswick County Schools teachers honored recently at the annual Teacher of the Year banquet.

    Outstanding educators, representing each school in the county, were honored as teachers of the year for their individual schools. Friday, they joined together with other educators, administrators and education advocates to celebrate their honors and to single out the district’s top teacher for 2008.

  • In the coming weeks, representatives from the Republican and Democratic parties here in Brunswick County have some very important decisions to make.

    The Republican Party will be looking for someone to fill the shoes of David Sandifer, a longtime county commissioner and commissioners’ chair, who died after a battle with cancer.

  • While the bid for Democratic and Republican spots for the next president of the United States has dominated national media, local voters also have some important races to decide this May much closer to home.

    In addition to determining who’ll be on the November ballot for county commissioner, school board and other races, Brunswick County voters will have the chance to select nominees for North Carolina’s next governor.

  • Since 1996, David Sandifer had been serving the people of Brunswick County as a county commissioner. While it may have been one of his more high profile positions, it was only one of many hats he wore while serving the people of this community.

  • Warm weather has arrived in Brunswick County, and this weekend is projected to bring even warmer temperatures that will move lots of people outdoors and into the sunshine.

    As Brunswick County residents head outside to enjoy the spring weather, so will others. Starting with the Easter weekend, residents get ready to share the roads and beaches with the countless travelers that will make their way into our community. The bustle traditionally lasts through the Labor Day weekend.

  • The Beacon’s recent adventure into examining how local agencies respond to open records requests was eye-opening.

    On our part, we learned the value of understanding, in very specific terms, exactly what it is we are looking for. Because wording among agencies may vary, we learned how important it is to clearly explain what it is we need.

    We learned it’s important to have a good understanding of the public records law before going into an agency and to be prepared, at any time, to explain that to the individuals who have the records we want.

  • Being a teacher is often a thankless job.

    Long gone are the days where teachers were respected by parents and the students they taught. We no longer see boys and girls coming to school in their Sunday best.

  • Change is often difficult. It’s especially hard when you have to tell someone you care about goodbye. It’s even harder when that person is someone you have grown to respect and admire.

    Such is the case this week as the staff at The Brunswick Beacon prepares to say farewell to a community icon—sports editor Doug Rutter.

  • When an everyday citizen becomes an elected official, there’s often a tough road ahead. In addition to learning the ins and outs of basic government duties, officials have to educate themselves about the community they’re in, the topics they’re discussing and general government procedures.

    An important part of an elected position is understanding open meetings and open records law. Federal and state laws dictate how certain information is discussed, decided upon and shared with the public.

  • It’s easy to be vocal about things you don’t like. Whether you’re discussing a current event that has you hot under the collar or complaining about happenings in the world, people, by nature, more easily complain than take charge of things and promote change.

  • When it comes to emergency situations, getting information out to the public as quickly as possible is important.

    In the past, emergency officials relied heavily on television and radio stations to get urgent warnings out fast. While those tools will continue to be important in emergency preparedness, with changes in today’s ever-evolving electronic society, alternatives are needed.

  • When Shallotte alderman Walt Eccard looks at Shallotte, he doesn’t just see what’s there now, he dreams of what could be.

    Eccard and other community members have been working together to create a plan to guide development of this ever-growing town. Through a number of donations and town support, the Downtown Shallotte Development Committee has been able to bring a professional planner into the mix, with the hopes of creating a long-term plan to improve life and appearances in Shallotte.

  • When legislators representing local constituents feels strongly enough about an issue to support its passage into law, it’s good business to make sure someone thinks through all the details of how it will be implemented.

    That doesn’t seem the case with two bills recently passed that will affect local detention centers, including ours right here in Brunswick County.