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Fishing

  • Rising water temperatures improving the fishing
  • Mother’s Day also a good time to go fishing
  • Gulf Stream action heating up

    The first week of May can be a magical time for fishermen of Brunswick County. As history tells it, May is typically the transition month for almost all targeted species of game fish along the southeastern section of North Carolina. Mahi mahi have begun their annual late spring run up the edge of the coast, the king mackerel have started feeding in the 30-mile range and, thankfully, a few Spanish mackerel have been found along the beachfront. 

  • Flounder are biting in many areas

    The average water temperature in our area is holding in the lower 70s and that has triggered a good flounder bite. Shallow areas like Tubbs Inlet and Dunn Sound, S.C., and Hogg Inlet S.C., have all produced numbers of small flounder the last few weeks. As the water temperature has continued rise and is holding around 70 degrees even in our surf zones, deeper areas have started to show signs of life. Places like the Little River (S.C.) jetties, Shallotte Inlet and Lockwood Folly have all seen more flounder this week with solid keepers in the mix.

  • Great time to try to catch mahi mahi

    Every spring an event occurs that puts offshore anglers of our area into ultimate pandemonium. The chaos begins with just one or two boats that head to the Gulf Stream in search of a tug on the line. Typically, these boats return to the dock with decent success, which also sparks interest of more anglers to venture offshore. Then, before you know it, dozens of boats are returning to the dock with incredible tales all revolving around one thing: the late spring mahi mahi run.

  • Offshore charter gets first king mackerel of year

    By Capt. Derek Treffinger

    Fishermen often tell stories about events or weather patterns they have experienced. Typically, the story will start with “it was so rough” and end with “it was this close but got away” to amplify the intensity of the story.

  • Our fishing resource needs your support
  • Rough conditions lead fishermen inshore

    As we enter the second week of April, it seems as if weather patterns have yet to decide to be late winter or spring. One week we’ll experience rain with mild temperatures, then the following week we set a record-low temperature. For some, these fluctuations in weather result in fewer days to wear shorts and T-shirts. However, fishermen of Brunswick County receive an impact that is far worse than a change in wardrobe.

  • Conditions that affect the fabric of fishing
  • Fishy disappearance needs an explanation

    The weather could not have been any more perfect than the final days of last week. The winds were light in the morning with the no-see-ums chewing the flesh off my bones. By midmorning a warm breeze kept the no-see-ums at bay and allowed me to come out of my hoodie. It looks as if our last cool blast will have passed us by the time you read this column and we will be in a true springtime pattern. It is looking like a typical spring break for our students with warm weather and a slight chance of showers each day. It is definitely time to get after the fish.