.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Fishing

  • Here are some mistakes to avoid in catching sea mullet

    The Brunswick County piers are seeing their best run of sea mullet (whiting) since the 1980s, although not many anglers are taking advantage of it and not many of them are doing the exact right things.
    I can tell you the sea mullet are there, though, since I spent last weekend catching them until I couldn’t lift my arm and saw other folks having similar results.

  • Feeding station set up at OIFC Reef

    Staff Report

    Last year the N.C. Marine Fisheries designated AR460 (Artificial Reef 460) as OIFC/Jolly Mon Reef in honor and appreciation of the work done by Ocean Isle Fishing Center to enhance and promote the fisheries. (AR460 was established by the Long Bay Artificial Reef Association 3 miles off Ocean Isle Beach.)
    At the presentation ceremony, Capt. Brant McMullan said, “Our goal at OIFC will be to make this the best artificial reef along the coast and we will put our minds to work to come up with a plan to make that happen.”

  • Sea mullet are a dependable panfish

    The early spring Brunswick County pier and surf action has been dominated by the good news of strong sea mullet runs. Last year was a good year for them, too, and with catches of spot and croaker seeming to decline each year, they are rapidly becoming our most dependable panfish.
    Sea mullet, also called whiting or Virginia mullet in North Carolina, are a generally small but delicious fish caught from the northern Atlantic Ocean beaches (where northern anglers call them kingfish) all the way down around into the Gulf of Mexico.

  • Spring fishing making an early appearance

    There is no doubt spring is firmly here. It has pretty much been here since November.  
    The interesting story this season is going to be how the fish react to such a mild winter.  Last winter was extremely cold and the resulting fishing was below average. Will the opposite hold true this season? One fact is for sure: the fish will be arriving well ahead of schedule.
    There are reports of good catches of Mahi-mahi off Charleston, S.C., which means those fish are soon to be off our coast; typically not seen until May.  

  • Spring fishing gets an early start this year

    The weather has been absolutely great for this entire past week. It is unimaginable to get so many days of light winds, not to mention warm temperatures.
    Fishermen from all genres awakened from their winter slumber and got on the water, with most reporting action from a variety of species.
    Inshore the redfish, flounder and trout are all starting to show good. Offshore, the Gulf Stream is producing good catches of wahoo with scattered blackfin tuna and Mahi-mahi.

  • The spring fish are already biting

    March is not normally a time to talk much about flounder fishing in Brunswick County, but with the strange weather and the lack of a real winter, fishing for them is good.
    In addition to the suspected early redfish and speckled trout, other spring fish, like whiting and bluefish, are already biting. Barring a late cold snap, spring fishing appears to be on.
    Some area piers are already open and doing business. Tommy Thomes at the Oak Island Pier reports better than usual fishing for late March.

  • Taking kids fishing: They’re the future of the sport

    One of the great joys of fishing is introducing the sport to the next generation. Taking a kid fishing is a lot of fun and a great investment in the future. Capt. Jacob Frick of J&J Inshore Charters fishes out of the Ocean Isle Beach in Brunswick County and is one of the many fishing guides who will help their customers introduce children to the sport. I asked him about his experience and advice regarding taking kids fishing.

  • Trout and redfish are active again

    After a bit of a lull, speckled trout and redfish seem to be hitting again along the Brunswick County coast and in upper South Carolina. The speckled trout and redfish bite is still inshore, along the marsh flats and waterway holes on the low tides and warmer days.
    “Trout are still hanging around,” said Capt. Jacob Frick of J & J Charters, Ocean Isle Beach. “Redfish need to be targeted around the lower tides. Water temperature is near 60 degrees and a few flounder should start to wake up.”

  • Latest regulation upsets fishermen

    I want to get into some great new fishing lures just released into the market, but first I have to put a word in for our local commercial and charter fleets and what is going on to them in these hard economic times.
    Fishing has been an industry hit hardest by the economy as it comes at the same time that the current federal administration is supporting new environmental and resource limits that are a harsh blow to Brunswick County offshore boats and our neighbors to the south in the Little River, S.C., fleet.

  • Fishing finally slows—but not for long

    This has been such an unusually mild winter that right now, when I am usually writing a column telling you not to despair because spring will soon be here, I am instead writing to inform you that winter seems to finally have slowed down the inshore bite.
    I guess I can do both, since the water is now cold enough that the fishing has indeed slowed, but it isn’t that long a wait until spring. Strange but true.