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Fishing

  • Weather keeps fish safe in Far Out Shoot Out Tourney

    Several years ago I changed the format of the Far Out Shoot Out: Tuna, Dolphin and Wahoo Tournament to a format whereby boats participating could choose to fish one out of eight days.
    The idea was to offer a larger weather window and, hopefully, participants could compete under better conditions. You would think eight days would do it, but this year the weather gods won, and the fish were safe from the tournament fishermen.

  • Flounder striking at all times of day

    Brunswick County inshore fishing is falling into an early summerlike pattern most likely because of the rising water temperatures. That means good action in the early morning and at night, and when the tide is really moving, but slow fishing at times during the heat of the day.

  • ‘Conspiracy’ discovered

    For all the conspiracy theory folks out there, consider this: The economy goes in the tank for the last several years, keeping fishermen off the water. Fuel prices skyrocket, keeping fishermen off the water. Politics take a turn such that our current administration creates all sorts of rules keeping fishermen off the water. The wind machine cranks up keeping fishermen off the water…

  • Redfish, black drum are good targets now

    Inshore and pier fishing has continued to pick back up in Brunswick County as the water warms. We should have solid action from now until the water gets really hot in late June and July.
    Flounder continue to hit well inshore and some are showing up off the piers. The favored live bait is still mud minnows but finger mullet and small pinfish will work as well. Anglers casting the scented soft bait lures are also catching flounder around structure.

  • Near-shore fishing is improving

    As water temperatures continue to rise, the near-shore fishing for Spanish mackerel, king mackerel and cobia will continue to improve.
    This past week the Spanish mackerel bite has turned back on as schools of good sized Spanish can be found all along Brunswick beaches feeding on glass minnows in 20-30 feet of water. Trolling topwater Clark Spoon Alabama rigs has been effective in capitalizing on this fishery.  

  • To catch flounder, cast to structure

    Flounder fishing has picked up again in Brunswick County and should be very good until the weather gets hot.
    A predominant number of flounder anglers like to drift or troll to catch the popular flatfish. But as for me, I get better results by anchoring up and casting to structure.

  • Weather stabilizes and fishing heats up

    Fishing is really getting cranked up. Last week I reported kings and Spanish biting along the beachfront. Immediately following the start of this bite, the weather turned and it blew hard Southwest for nearly a week, keeping fishermen off the water and dirtying the water.
    As I have said many times, the weather is a pendulum and, like politics, when it swings too far one way, it will likely swing back too far the other, rarely reaching a happy medium. Thus last week’s long stint of high winds looks to be followed by this week’s long stint of stable weather.

  • May should be a good month for fishing

    After a vigorous start to the spring fishing season, the bite has slowed a bit for Brunswick County anglers as we get into May. Shifting and unsettled weather patterns, wind and occasionally muddy water have factored into a few slow weeks.
    Still, a respectable number of fish are being caught, including some very big ones. Chopper blues and king mackerel are being landed off of the piers, the inshore flounder bite is still decent and a lot of black drum are prowling around structure inside.

  • Plenty of fish caught inshore

    After a tremendous start to the spring fishing season, the inshore action slowed down a little bit over the last few weeks, but there are still plenty of fish being caught. Things are likely to pick up for a big burst in late April and May before the summer heat slows things down again in June.
    Inshore redfish continue to feed but the schools are a bit more dispersed and finding them is not as easy. Also, pinfish and small bluefish have entered the equation, so fishing bait is more of a problem.

  • Now is the time to ‘go catching’

    Having been a fisherman my entire life, and doing it for a living for more than 20 years, I think I can legitimately claim I can “sense” what’s happening on the water. Of all the things I’ve learned about fishing in my life on the water, the most important is to know and understand the changing conditions, and then be able to adapt and adjust.