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Fishing

  • Atlantic sturgeon now a federally endangered species

    Atlantic sturgeon are now a federally endangered species. The National Marine Fisheries Service has published a final rule in the Federal Register listing four distinct population segments of Atlantic sturgeon as endangered and another as threatened. To read the final rule, go to: http://www.nero.noaa.gov/nero/regs/frdoc/12/12AtlSturgeonFR_SER.pdf.
    The Carolina and South Atlantic population segments, both of which are prevalent in North Carolina waters, will be listed as endangered.

  • Fishing the Gulf Stream is an amazing trip

    After weeks of great weather, bring on the holiday week—and sure enough the weather gods step in to mess up most of our plans, including any opportunity to head offshore to fish the Gulf Stream, where big fish are waiting.  
    At the Ocean Isle Fishing Center, we were able to run one trip before the winter winds returned. We found good action around the 100/400 and Blackjack with multiple Wahoo up to 60 pounds and big blackfin tuna up to 25 pounds.

  • It’s time to start the fishing season

    With the amazingly wild warm weather we have had this winter and early spring, it’s hard to declare a start to the fishing season that the weatherman says never closed. Although conditions have been perfect for weeks and the fish have been co-operating, what’s missing are the fishermen.
    I can only imagine the number of baby fish being born because of the lack of fishing pressure; so if there is a silver cloud to the high fuel prices keeping fishermen off the water, maybe that’s it.

  • Here are some mistakes to avoid in catching sea mullet

    The Brunswick County piers are seeing their best run of sea mullet (whiting) since the 1980s, although not many anglers are taking advantage of it and not many of them are doing the exact right things.
    I can tell you the sea mullet are there, though, since I spent last weekend catching them until I couldn’t lift my arm and saw other folks having similar results.

  • Feeding station set up at OIFC Reef

    Staff Report

    Last year the N.C. Marine Fisheries designated AR460 (Artificial Reef 460) as OIFC/Jolly Mon Reef in honor and appreciation of the work done by Ocean Isle Fishing Center to enhance and promote the fisheries. (AR460 was established by the Long Bay Artificial Reef Association 3 miles off Ocean Isle Beach.)
    At the presentation ceremony, Capt. Brant McMullan said, “Our goal at OIFC will be to make this the best artificial reef along the coast and we will put our minds to work to come up with a plan to make that happen.”

  • Sea mullet are a dependable panfish

    The early spring Brunswick County pier and surf action has been dominated by the good news of strong sea mullet runs. Last year was a good year for them, too, and with catches of spot and croaker seeming to decline each year, they are rapidly becoming our most dependable panfish.
    Sea mullet, also called whiting or Virginia mullet in North Carolina, are a generally small but delicious fish caught from the northern Atlantic Ocean beaches (where northern anglers call them kingfish) all the way down around into the Gulf of Mexico.

  • Spring fishing making an early appearance

    There is no doubt spring is firmly here. It has pretty much been here since November.  
    The interesting story this season is going to be how the fish react to such a mild winter.  Last winter was extremely cold and the resulting fishing was below average. Will the opposite hold true this season? One fact is for sure: the fish will be arriving well ahead of schedule.
    There are reports of good catches of Mahi-mahi off Charleston, S.C., which means those fish are soon to be off our coast; typically not seen until May.  

  • Spring fishing gets an early start this year

    The weather has been absolutely great for this entire past week. It is unimaginable to get so many days of light winds, not to mention warm temperatures.
    Fishermen from all genres awakened from their winter slumber and got on the water, with most reporting action from a variety of species.
    Inshore the redfish, flounder and trout are all starting to show good. Offshore, the Gulf Stream is producing good catches of wahoo with scattered blackfin tuna and Mahi-mahi.

  • The spring fish are already biting

    March is not normally a time to talk much about flounder fishing in Brunswick County, but with the strange weather and the lack of a real winter, fishing for them is good.
    In addition to the suspected early redfish and speckled trout, other spring fish, like whiting and bluefish, are already biting. Barring a late cold snap, spring fishing appears to be on.
    Some area piers are already open and doing business. Tommy Thomes at the Oak Island Pier reports better than usual fishing for late March.

  • Taking kids fishing: They’re the future of the sport

    One of the great joys of fishing is introducing the sport to the next generation. Taking a kid fishing is a lot of fun and a great investment in the future. Capt. Jacob Frick of J&J Inshore Charters fishes out of the Ocean Isle Beach in Brunswick County and is one of the many fishing guides who will help their customers introduce children to the sport. I asked him about his experience and advice regarding taking kids fishing.