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Fishing

  • Reels are starting to sing again

    By Capt. Derek Treffinger

     The king mackerel fishing has finally started to improve this week. Good catches of 15- to 30-pound fish were coming from hard bottom areas and ledges in 60 to 75 feet of water. This can only mean one thing — the kings are on the move back inshore. Cooler air and water temperatures will trigger these fish to move near shore. Once the water temperatures reaches the ideal 72 to 76 degrees, there is almost a guaranteed bite somewhere between the beach and shark hole.

  • Questions, questions about how to catch fish

     Delane and Jessica Edwards from the Whiteville area fished with me Friday, Aug. 22. Delane Edwards started right out of the gate with the usual questions, “How long you been doing this, Captain?” “Do you think we will catch anything today, Captain?” “How old are you, Captain?” “Where you from, Captain?”

  • Search waters near favorite fishing hole

     By Capt. Derek Treffinger

  • Right-on-time fishing for redfish

     

  • Fishing for shark, barracuda

    By Capt. Derek Treffinger 

    It has once again been another tough week for anglers in Brunswick County. Between the torrential rainstorms and gale force winds, it seems fishermen can’t catch a break. The storms that stalled across our coastline last week produced torrential rains, which dirtied our near shore waters. This shattered almost every angler’s hope to catch Spanish mackerel along the beach this week.

  • Change in weather brings new challenge
  • August is month to catch wahoo

    By Derek Treffinger

    It has been a long, hard week for fishermen along the Brunswick County beaches. The beginning of the week presented us a miserable 15- to 20-knot east wind that kept almost every fisherman stuck at the dock. Then to follow the wonderful wind we had, massive lines of wind, rain and thunderstorms hhovered over our coast almost all weekend. It seems we as fishermen cannot seem to catch a break here lately. However, there is one thing to look forward toward once this miserable weather ends: the fishing can only improve.

  • Rules about anchored gill net permits

     A few years ago, the harmful effects of sea turtle encounters with gill nets were brought to the mainstream. Technology has allowed concerned observers to capture video and pictures of all sorts of marine life destroyed by those careless with gill nets. Gill nets left unattended for several hours can capture and destroy many marine animals, such as sea turtles, dolphins, birds and sturgeon.

  • Hurricane passes and mullet minnows surge

     The fishing column has been absent the last couple weeks but not because of the lack of fishing action. We are in the peak of our busy season and traffic should remain steady until mid-August. We have just experienced our first close call this season with a hurricane and we should be thankful for the near miss. Folks on the Outer Banks got the worst of it, but it could have been much worse. Let’s hope this is the first and last one we have to deal with this season.

  • In Jolly Mon King Classic, tough got tougher

     By Derek Treffinger

    The big weekend has come to an end. Tournament anglers slide their boats back onto the trailer either licking their wounds or counting the cash they won from the big king mackerel tournament last weekend. For some of you that are unaware of the event, the Yellowfin/Yamaha Jolly Mon King Classic took place Thursday, June 26, through Sunday, June 29, out of the Ocean Isle Fishing Center.