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Fishing

  • Mother Nature deals tough hand

    I am struggling here trying to keep the reports coming when at best all we can get is one day a week to head offshore. The cold fronts and low-pressure storms have been relentless. As such, the ocean has continued to be dirty and stirred up.

  • Cold-water fishing has begun in county

    Cold-water fishing has begun in Brunswick County, and that means local anglers targeting the big three low-temperature inshore fish: speckled trout, redfish and black drum. It is important to know how to catch each species and what the regulations are for keeping or releasing them.

  • NOAA public meeting on gillnets Nov. 16 in Southport

    The Office for Law Enforcement under the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA will present a public meeting to all members of the fishing community in Southport on Nov. 16 at the Southport Community Building, 201 E. Moore St.
    The presentation will begin at 6 p.m. and admission is free.
    The primary objective of this meeting is to better educate those who use gillnets in coastal waters of this state, on the Atlantic Large Whale Take Reduction Plan (ALWTRP) and the requirements therein.

  • State seeks comments on fishery issues

    The N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries is asking the public to submit comments on issues they would like to see addressed in an upcoming Shrimp Fishery Management Plan.
    The division is beginning a mandated five-year review of the N.C. Shrimp Fishery Management Plan that was adopted by the N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission in 2006.
    The agency is soliciting public comment as part of an internal process to determine what procedural method to take in reviewing the plan.

  • Gulf Stream action heats up

    While the air may be cold, the Gulf Stream fishing is red hot. Between the seemingly nonstop strong winds and rough seas, a small weather window allowed fishermen to head offshore last midweek to test what should be good Gulf Stream fishing.
    The results were positive, as boats fishing from the BlackJack to the Steeples reported multiple wahoo catches as well as blackfin tuna and a mix of Mahi-mahi and sailfish.

  • Don’t let the cold stop surf fishing

    November and December are great months to get into cold-water surf fishing for red drum in Brunswick County. We do not have the huge populations of big bull reds that the Outer Banks does during the colder months, but many redfish cruise the surf before they go inside when the water gets really cold and school up waiting for next spring.

  • November is a great month to target flounder

    November is a great month to target flounder. It is often when we see the biggest and the most flounder in Brunswick County waters. The flounder bite this year has been surprisingly strong, considering there is still concern about the stock’s status due to their amazing popularity with both recreational and commercial fishermen and all the pressure that brings. Still, the flounder season has been good and November will likely be the best month yet.

  • Team Instigator wins Fall Brawl King Classic

    Scott Smith and crew of the Instigator fought through 40 miles of rough seas so they could fish a spot they hoped would be holding a big king mackerel. They battled not only Mother Nature but also other hungry predators, as the kings they hooked were continuously bitten by barracuda and shark.

  • Inshore saltwater fishing is in full swing

    Fall Carolina inshore saltwater fishing is in full swing on the Brunswick County coast, with all of its usual shifting winds, occasional rainstorms, heavy tides and hit- and-miss fishing. Fortunately, that also means a ton of moving mullet schools, shrimp and crabs in the water and a lot of nice bait and choices for anglers.

  • Charlie the Tuna won’t like ‘Surf and Saltwater Fishing,’ anglers will

    BY SARAH SUE INGRAM
    BEACON CORRESPONDENT
    What kind of fish likes to bite bait on gold hooks?
    Is the summer or southern flounder caught most often in our inshore waters?
    Which fish’s hormones give it the color of its belly?
    The answers to these and many more questions can be found in the new book “Surf and Saltwater Fishing in the Carolinas” by Beacon fishing columnist Jeffrey Weeks.