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Fishing

  • Anglers worried about speckled trout

    As regular as clockwork, the solid redfish action continues to take place in the creeks of Brunswick County and in upper South Carolina, even as concern spreads over the health of the local speckled trout population.

  • Enough already: Is it spring yet?

    This has been one long, cold winter. It has dragged on and on, and I’m ready to get it done. If you’ve been looking for my reports over the past couple of months, I apologize for being absent. However, hard to report when there’s nothing much to talk about; or should I say nothing good to talk about. 

  • Some baits to consider using

    Anglers have come to love Berkley Gulp scented soft baits and since their introduction to the inshore saltwater fishing market, they have quickly become the top lure for catching speckled trout, redfish and flounder. Contrary to some rumors, however, these revolutionary synthetic baits don’t actually fish themselves—you do have to do a little work. Since the tackle store shelves are full of these lures, the first bit of work is figuring out which ones to use.

  • Winter anglers have success catching redfish

    It has been a winter of spectacular redfish action and not much else in Brunswick County. The red drum action has been amazingly consistent for those few fishing for them. Boaters have been plying the shallowest parts of the back creeks on low tide and catching redfish all winter.

  • Redfish continue to bite in creeks

    The only game in town remains the solid redfish action going on in Brunswick County and northern South Carolina. Red drum have hit all year through any kind of weather, and the latest dusting of snow shouldn’t put them off at all.

    Despite water temps hitting 39 degrees consistently, the redfish bite has continued uninterrupted in the backwater creeks.

  • New fishing book is guide to fishing in the state

    North Carolina fishing enthusiasts are about to get a great tool to help them in their angling endeavors. Veteran outdoors writer Mike Marsh is publishing “Fishing North Carolina,” which is going to be a must-read for any angler who loves fishing this state.

  • Some baits to use to catch redfish

    The most popular and sought-after inshore fish in local waters during the winter are redfish. This is because they stay in the backwaters and school up in tight pods roaming the inside creeks and inlets feasting on small fish, ghost shrimp and crabs.

    Redfish hit several types of lures well during the winter. You can often sight-cast to them in the clear, cold water. One thing to remember is to keep the noise down, and many redfish experts pole their boats with long poles rather than using trolling motors and anchors that will spook red drum schools.

  • In the cold, redfish can be caught in creeks

    The weather hasn’t been the best for fishing thus far in 2011, though local waters have not stopped producing nice redfish in the back creeks. When the weather allows it, this action is available for those hardy enough to seek it.

  • Speckled trout fishing on hold

    For the first time in state history, speckled trout fishing is temporarily closed down. N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) Director Louis Daniel issued a proclamation last week closing all waters to commercial and recreational harvest of the important species for an indefinite period.

  • Stock up on inshore fishing gear now and be ready for spring fishing

    Winter is a great time to stock up on some of the essential inshore saltwater fishing gear you will need once the weather warms. One of the hardest markets for anglers to keep up in is the ever-changing world of fishing lures. It seems you can’t walk into Walmart or Bass Pro Shop today without being bewildered by the number and choices available to you.

    Fortunately, you have me to shift through the endless streams of sizes, scents and colors marketed to fishermen and give you advice on some lures that are as good at catching fish as catching your eye.