• December: Time to fish red drum, speckled trout

    Red drum and speckled trout fishing are already into their wintertime pattern, even though the outside temperatures are still touching 70 some days.
    That is great news for local anglers who want to pursue redfish and trout in boats, looking for the schools in the shallow water without having to endure the harsh cold that will eventually come. If you are a small-boat angler in Brunswick County, now is a good time to get on the water.

  • Speckled trout season has begun

    December is here and that means speckled trout season in Brunswick County.
    Each year anglers begin their annual pursuit of the beautiful and aggressive specks as they roam inshore and in the surf in large schools, hitting a variety of baits and lures and running the tides at both predictable and totally unpredictable times.
    Unfortunately, the biggest news in trout fishing this year is the new North Carolina size and creel limits. Recreational anglers can now keep only four speckled trout with a 14-inch size limit.

  • Fish are biting inshore, offshore

    I hope everyone had a great Thanksgiving weekend. Mother Nature did her part and gave us one of the nicest weather weekends we have had all year.
    It was beautiful. Offshore fishermen were finally given a multiple-day weather window to get offshore and take advantage of the area’s great late fall fishing. The Gulf Stream yielded good catches of wahoo with mixed in Mahi-mahi and blackfin tuna. The bite was not red-hot but respectable with most catches bringing in multiple wahoo, averaging in the 40- to 50- pound class.

  • Sea mullet make another good target in November

    Thanksgiving is almost here and that means the last gasp of pier fishing and most surf fishing and the start of the real inshore cold-water season.
    Everyone knows speckled trout and red drum are the two big targets everyone turns to about this time, but there are other inshore fish worth chasing as well.

  • Team OIFC wins 2011 Southern Kingfish Association national title

    In 2009, Team OIFC (Ocean Isle Fishing Center) consisting of Brant, Barrett and Rube McMullan, won the Southern Kingfish Association’s (SKA) National Championship title.
    The victory was a record-breaking feat, as the family team weighed a monster 74.1-pound king mackerel to anchor its winning 118-pound, two-fish aggregate. The 74.1-pound weight was a Mississippi state record, an all-time SKA record and it was the largest winning aggregate in SKA history.

  • Mother Nature deals tough hand

    I am struggling here trying to keep the reports coming when at best all we can get is one day a week to head offshore. The cold fronts and low-pressure storms have been relentless. As such, the ocean has continued to be dirty and stirred up.

  • Cold-water fishing has begun in county

    Cold-water fishing has begun in Brunswick County, and that means local anglers targeting the big three low-temperature inshore fish: speckled trout, redfish and black drum. It is important to know how to catch each species and what the regulations are for keeping or releasing them.

  • NOAA public meeting on gillnets Nov. 16 in Southport

    The Office for Law Enforcement under the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA will present a public meeting to all members of the fishing community in Southport on Nov. 16 at the Southport Community Building, 201 E. Moore St.
    The presentation will begin at 6 p.m. and admission is free.
    The primary objective of this meeting is to better educate those who use gillnets in coastal waters of this state, on the Atlantic Large Whale Take Reduction Plan (ALWTRP) and the requirements therein.

  • State seeks comments on fishery issues

    The N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries is asking the public to submit comments on issues they would like to see addressed in an upcoming Shrimp Fishery Management Plan.
    The division is beginning a mandated five-year review of the N.C. Shrimp Fishery Management Plan that was adopted by the N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission in 2006.
    The agency is soliciting public comment as part of an internal process to determine what procedural method to take in reviewing the plan.

  • Gulf Stream action heats up

    While the air may be cold, the Gulf Stream fishing is red hot. Between the seemingly nonstop strong winds and rough seas, a small weather window allowed fishermen to head offshore last midweek to test what should be good Gulf Stream fishing.
    The results were positive, as boats fishing from the BlackJack to the Steeples reported multiple wahoo catches as well as blackfin tuna and a mix of Mahi-mahi and sailfish.