• Gulf Stream fishing in full swing

    By Capt. Derek Treffinger

    As I sat on the dock enduring what seemed to be a never-ending tropical storm, I thought of the familiar saying “this too shall pass.” Meaning, if I was patient enough, the storm will pass, the seas would become calm and the fish would begin to bite again.

    Well, thankfully, last weekend, the storm passed and the fish were definitely hungry.

  • Flounder looking at stiff regulations

     We have just experienced our first tropical system of the year and it is only May. It is my hope the tropics will be much like last year, making this our one and only system that affects our area this year.

  • Ana scuppers fishing activities

     By Capt. Derek Treffinger

    As forecast, tropical storm Ana has officially unleashed its wrath on our county. This tropical depression not only created transportation problems and flooding but also brought the fast and furious fishing to a screeching halt.

    Before the storm, almost any spot in the ocean was producing some sort of catchable species. The Spanish mackerel were along the beach, the king mackerel were biting in the 20- to 40-mile range and the Gulf Stream bite was really picking up.

  • Spanish mackerel biting on the beach

     The backwater action has been hit or miss for most of us lately in our immediate area. That is sure to change as the weather pattern has become more stable. Most of the action in the backwater has been coming from flounder and croaker. Most of those fish are too small to keep for the dinner table.

  • Fishing needs weather to be stable
  • Indications are this will be a great Gulf Stream season

     By Capt. Derek Treffinger

    It seems every year I get a text message or an email from a fishing buddy stating he “left them biting,” meaning the fishing was so good the crew was tired of catching what was biting and moved elsewhere to catch something else. It just so happens I got a text message from Cody Tucker, who fished the Gulf Stream last weekend, saying “we left them biting.”

  • Fishing continues to improve with warmer temperatures


    Capt. Derek Treffinger

    It seems as if our fish population of Brunswick County has finally crept out of its winter haunts for good. This past week signified fish are around and they are hungry. Water temperatures along the beach climbed to a mild 65 degrees last weekend, providing the fish another reason to come closer to shore. No matter whether you were to fish inshore, nearshore or offshore, the bite has been better than what it was three weeks ago.

  • Heavy rain impedes the spring bite


  • Spring fishing fires off

     This past week was a perfect example of what spring fishing is all about. The seas finally calmed and many anglers got an opportunity to go fishing for the first time this year. Most folks experienced their best luck with wahoo, mahi mahi and blackfin tuna in various places along the Gulf Stream. In addition to the hot Gulf Stream bite, anglers that fished in the 30- to 40-mile range had great luck as well. Almost every boat that went bottom fishing in this range brought back big black sea bass, vermillion snapper, triggerfish and amberjack.

  • Fast changes in our fishery

     The water temperatures have gone from the low 60s to the low 70s in a week. We have had winds from all directions last week, but the east winds really started over the weekend. Water color was great Wednesday, April 8, and Thursday, April 9, but once the winds changed to the east our water went back to a dark brown. The only green water we are seeing in the Ocean Isle area is near the Shallotte Inlet and Tubbs Inlet during a rising tide. Conditions are changing quickly and the fishing also has been changing quickly.