.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Fishing

  • Offshore fishing action, finally

    This past weekend the weather finally gave offshore fishermen an opportunity to head offshore to pioneer the 2011 fishing season. The water temperatures out to 50 miles are still in the low to middle 60s, which does not offer much opportunity at top-water gamefish. 

  • Bill would have impact on redfish, trout, bass

    Inshore fishing is showing signs of life as strong redfish action continues while a few early-season speckled trout and flounder have been added to the mix. The piers have seen some whiting (sea mullet) action, which should pick up soon along with the addition of the season’s first bluefish.

  • Council proposes reduction in black sea bass limits

    In an effort to keep recreational fishermen from exceeding annual catch limits (ACLs) set for black sea bass in the coming fishing year, members of the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council approved an amendment that, if approved by the Secretary of Commerce, will reduce the recreational bag limit for black sea bass from 15 per person/day to five per person/day beginning June 1.

  • Redfish provide day-to-day action

    Water temperatures are rising slowly and early spring season anglers are finding the redfish just as active and willing to bite as they have been all winter. The amazingly strong and consistent red drum bite has been the big (and really, the only) inshore fishing story in lower North Carolina all winter and they are off and running for spring.

  • Weather is improving; fishing, too

    It is finally beginning to feel like spring. It feels good to see daylight at 7 p.m., not to mention the 60-degree days we had this past weekend. According to the forecasts, this week will bring more 60s and 70s by the weekend. This winter has dragged on and on; between dismal weather and dismal business conditions, it has been hard to muster up the optimism to prepare for the spring and summer. But all that is behind us now; time to look forward and be optimistic. 

  • Anglers worried about speckled trout

    As regular as clockwork, the solid redfish action continues to take place in the creeks of Brunswick County and in upper South Carolina, even as concern spreads over the health of the local speckled trout population.

  • Enough already: Is it spring yet?

    This has been one long, cold winter. It has dragged on and on, and I’m ready to get it done. If you’ve been looking for my reports over the past couple of months, I apologize for being absent. However, hard to report when there’s nothing much to talk about; or should I say nothing good to talk about. 

  • Some baits to consider using

    Anglers have come to love Berkley Gulp scented soft baits and since their introduction to the inshore saltwater fishing market, they have quickly become the top lure for catching speckled trout, redfish and flounder. Contrary to some rumors, however, these revolutionary synthetic baits don’t actually fish themselves—you do have to do a little work. Since the tackle store shelves are full of these lures, the first bit of work is figuring out which ones to use.

  • Winter anglers have success catching redfish

    It has been a winter of spectacular redfish action and not much else in Brunswick County. The red drum action has been amazingly consistent for those few fishing for them. Boaters have been plying the shallowest parts of the back creeks on low tide and catching redfish all winter.

  • Redfish continue to bite in creeks

    The only game in town remains the solid redfish action going on in Brunswick County and northern South Carolina. Red drum have hit all year through any kind of weather, and the latest dusting of snow shouldn’t put them off at all.

    Despite water temps hitting 39 degrees consistently, the redfish bite has continued uninterrupted in the backwater creeks.