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Fishing

  • Pompano provide great day fishing, terrific evening meals

     Local anglers are in the middle of a hot summer, and fishing is best in the early mornings or around sunset. 

    One species that can be caught during the day, however, are pompano. This year the pompano were late showing up in our waters but they are present now and will get more numerous as we pass August and go toward the fall.

  • Offshore fishing gets back to normal

     “Normal” is a loose word in reference to fishing. I’ve been fishing for many years, and I still struggle when someone asks me what he can expect to catch on any given day. 

    The problem is fish have minds of their own and tails that can lead them most anywhere. I’ve read science that says fish have a brain the size of a pea. I’ve been out there hunting fish on many days when I felt as if I had the brain the size of pea and they were nothing short of genius. 

  • A fish to target in summer is sheepshead

     Brunswick County inshore anglers are in the stranglehold of a familiar summer pattern right now: early morning bites, nothing happening during the hot days and powerful thunderstorms roaming at night. I wouldn’t say fishing is bad, but not much is happening while the sun is high in the sky.

  • Summer trade winds make tough offshore fishing conditions

     Mother Nature is balancing the weather equation once again. We had several incredible weeks of weather in mid-June and now we are paying for it in mid-July. 

    As is typical for the summer, a high-pressure ridge has set up to our west, known as a Bermuda high. This high-pressure system brings us a southerly flow, which drives up the heat and humidity and brings the southwest trade winds. These winds are what bother us fishermen the most, as the more the wind, the bigger the seas. 

  • Fishing variety continues despite heat

     Fishing has continued good throughout the area for a variety of species, despite water temperatures climbing well into the 80s.  

    In the backwater, the flounder, redfish and speckled trout have been biting. It is typical for the flounder and redfish to be good, but the surprising resurgence of speckled trout has many inshore guys scratching their heads. 

  • Tips to catch those lazy fish during summer doldrums

     Inshore fishing remains in the stranglehold of what fishermen refer to as the summer doldrums. There are fish present and feeding but everything becomes sluggish during the heat of the day, which can fool some folks into thinking there are no fish around. Instead of giving in, try these tips for summer fishing.

  • Early morning and night fishing are best options now

     A cool front came in last week and made temperatures more bearable again, and we are still holding in the low 90s. 

    Water temperature is still extremely high everywhere, however, and what was a solid few weeks of fishing all over has turned into more of the usual summer pattern, with fish very deep or inactive during a large part of the day. Early morning and night fishing are the best options now.

  • Anglers having luck just about everywhere

     Despite sweltering hot weather and high water temperatures, summer inshore fishing continues just as hot as the summer air. Anglers are having luck just about everywhere now, as many species are making up for a lackluster spring season by showing up as late but welcome visitors to the fishing season.

    Surf and pier action has been much better than it was in the spring. While fishing for sea mullet (whiting) has remained solid since the beginning of the spring, they are being joined in the surf now by feisty pompano and some unexpected spot.

  • Fish free in North Carolina public waters on Fourth of July

    Fish for free in all public waters, including coastal waters, from 12:01 a.m. until 11:59 p.m. on the Fourth of July. While everyone, residents and nonresidents, can fish in public waters on this date without a license, all other fishing regulations, such as length and daily possession limits, as well as bait and tackle restrictions, apply.

    Authorized by the N.C. General Assembly and started in 1994, North Carolina’s annual free fishing day, which always falls on July 4, was created to promote the sport of fishing.

  • Trout, flounder, redfish active in the morning

     Summer fishing has really kicked into high gear as what was a lackluster season has suddenly come alive with the hotter temperatures. Speckled trout, flounder and redfish have all been extremely active on the moving tides, especially in the morning.