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Fishing

  • Breakout week for offshore fishing

    When I left you last week, I was planning on fishing Tuesday in the Martini’s Hook A ’Hoo Wahoo Rodeo out of North Myrtle Beach, S.C. The tournament, which benefits the area Shriners, had 51 boats to register, very respectable in the world of offshore tournament fishing.
    Among the entries was the Ocean Isle Fishing Center team, consisting of my wife Amy; cousin Brian Aycock; his 11-year-old son, Austin; and myself.

  • Brunswick County fishermen are sitting on go, waiting for summer to arrive

    You ever get the feeling summer is never going to get here? The past couple of weeks have been very nice, but it’s been just cool enough to keep water temperatures stable instead of rising. And that’s what we need right now, warmer water temperatures. However, just as soon as I complain about the cool, I’ll soon be complaining about the heat, so I guess patience is required.

  • Sea mullet are a feisty panfish; look for them at night or early morning

    The weather continues to warm, but spring inshore fishing has suddenly cooled. After a strong preseason redfish bite, the local angling has hit a surprising lull, possibly the result of some combinations of wind and tide and possibly just because it’s going to be a slow-starting fishing season.

  • Windy conditions affecting fishing for redfish

    Local fishermen have struggled through windy conditions for the last week, but the weather is supposed to change right on time for the hot redfish bite to resume this weekend. Anglers were in the midst of some strong red drum action in shallow water, but windy conditions have made it hard on them lately.

  • This season, catching redfish 'is a blast'

    The spring redfish bite in Brunswick County and the Little River, S.C., area has been the best in many years. The inshore redfish have hit consistently in the shallow water, and these have been very nice-sized fish.

    Capt. Patrick Kelly, who goes by the handle Capt. Smiley and runs Captain Smiley Fishing Charters (http://www.captainsmileyfishingcharters.com) out of North Myrtle Beach, S.C., said he is amazed at how strong the redfish bite has been lately.

  • Get ready to catch speckled trout

    As spring arrives, Brunswick County anglers will begin their annual pursuit of the beautiful and elusive speckled trout. Right now most folks on the water are chasing redfish in the shallows, as redfish have been the most consistent bite during this unusually harsh winter. That will change soon, however, as trout anglers begin to look for specks to help them shake off the winter doldrums.

  • In cold weather, redfish action heats up chilly waters

    Temperatures in the 60s have been heating up the inshore waters of Brunswick County, and though the water is still relatively cold, the action on redfish is hot.

    “We’re poling to get to them in the tidal pools of the shallow creeks,” said Capt. Mark Dickson of Shallow Minded Charters. “They’ve been a little bigger lately. We usually see lots of fish in the 16- to 20-inch class this time of year, but lately we have been catching lots of fish in the 22-to 26-inch class with an occasional 30-incher mixed in.”

  • Spring's arrival will bring plenty of redfish to Brunswick County

    Spring isn’t quite here yet, but it won’t be long before Brunswick County anglers will be out in force stalking those feisty spring redfish. Redfish travel in schools in the spring, cruising the shallows looking for shellfish and small fish to eat.

  • The Future of America's fishing industry

    Brant McMullan achieved some life goals when he attended and spoke Feb. 24 at the United We Fish rally at the U.S. Capitol to amend the Magnuson-Stevens Conservation and Management Act. But another goal—passage of a bill to amend the act—is still in doubt.

    “I thought it went really good,” McMullan said about the rally. “If I were to guess, 40 percent were from the New York-Massachusetts area, 40 percent from the Carolinas and the remainder from Florida, up and down the East Coast. A couple of people came from Alaska.”

  • Gill net fishing not yet at an end

    Gill net fishing in North Carolina may be coming to an end because of federal and environmental concerns about sea turtles, but commercial fishermen are not going down without a fight.

    In an effort to reach a compromise that will save North Carolina’s gill net fishing industry, the Marine Fisheries Commission (MFC) voted last Friday to continue to allow large mesh gill net fishing, restricting it to four days a week.

    The MFC had been considering eliminating large mesh nets from May 15 to Dec. 15 to prevent interactions with sea turtles.