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Fishing

  • First bluefin tuna of season hooked off Brunswick County coast

    The anticipation has been building over the past weeks as fishermen await the arrival of the giant bluefin tuna to our waters. Since 2005, these powerful and highly valuable fish have provided sport and much needed supplemental income to local fishermen. As this is still a new fishery to our area, every year the big question is, “I wonder if they’ll show.”

  • Inshore fishing heating up in December

    Despite the colder weather and periods of rain, inshore fishing has really heated up in December. All the usual winter species are in place and biting, and fish continue a late-season surge that has them on the move and feeding.

    I got into the black drum last week at Sunset Beach. After nightfall I could have had all the 12- to 14- inch black drum I wanted. Caught about 20 until they tired me out, and kept eight for supper.

  • Outstanding fishing foreseen for this month

    The long anticipated arrival of the first bluefin tuna catches of the year are finally here. This past weekend the first giant bluefin of the year were landed out of Morehead City. Reports are the water is still a bit on the warm side, but the recent cool weather will certainly drive more fish to our waters.

  • Flounder situation complicated by uncertainties

    North Carolina’s southern flounder stock is in trouble and an eventual closed season is one of the possibilities for the future, according to N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries Director Dr. Louis Daniels.

    “We enacted a plan to reduce over-fishing in 2005, and the law says you have to end over-fishing in 10 years,” said Daniels, in an interview earlier Tuesday. “So what happens if we get to 2015 and we haven’t achieved that goal? One response would be to close the fishery if that happened.”

  • Catch speckled trout, then try these recipes

    The thoughts of inshore anglers have turned to speckled trout, and the trout have responded. Specks are around all year but they really shine as the weather cools because they school up tight and continue to roam inshore long after many other species are gone.

    “The fishing around here this past week has been dynamite,” Capt. Mark Dickson of Shallow Minded Charters said. “The trout bite has been killer just about everywhere from the jetties to the Sunset Beach Bridge and even all the way back down to Coquina Harbor.”

  • In between seasons, it still is a good time to fish

    Water temperatures remain higher than normal, but fish are feeling the inevitable push of the upcoming winter season, as hot-water species leave the area and cold-water species become the target of anglers.

    From now until the early spring, speckled trout and red drum will be the premier inshore fish.

  • McMullan family wins SKA national title

    It is hard to put in perspective the events and good fortune we had this past weekend while fishing the SKA National Championship tournament in Biloxi, Miss. The only way I can think to try to explain it is we, the Ocean Isle Fishing Center tournament team of Brant, Barrett and Rube McMullan, weighed the largest king mackerel ever weighed in the 19-year history of the SKA and quite possibly the largest king ever weighed in any competition. And we did it on the grandest stage of all, the Southern Kingfish Association’s national championship tournament.

  • November is a great time for anglers to target trout and redfish

    All the rain lately has hindered anglers, but in periods of brief sunlight they’re finding the fish are still hitting.

    We’ve begun moving into the cold-water period of the fishing season, and that means a lot of species on the move. It’s the last chance to catch some, and the beginning of looking for others to school up in bunches.

  • Competition is close in Capt. Kyle's Inshore Classic tournament

    Mother Nature opened up a window over the weekend that afforded fishermen an excellent opportunity to get on the water. It could not have been any nicer on Saturday and Sunday, and the fishing results could not have been much better, either. Inshore, the speckled trout fishing has been outstanding. At the Shallotte River, Lockwood, Little River—you name it, the fish have been biting. Add in the abundance of redfish and a sprinkle of flounder, then you have some of the year’s best inshore fishing.

  • Sheepshead, black drum fun fish to target

    Water temperatures remain a little higher than normal and inshore fishing continues to be good. In addition to the usual suspects this time of the year (such as red drum, speckled trout and flounder) two fish that have been hitting consistently are sheepshead and black drum.