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Fishing

  • Get ready to catch speckled trout

    As spring arrives, Brunswick County anglers will begin their annual pursuit of the beautiful and elusive speckled trout. Right now most folks on the water are chasing redfish in the shallows, as redfish have been the most consistent bite during this unusually harsh winter. That will change soon, however, as trout anglers begin to look for specks to help them shake off the winter doldrums.

  • In cold weather, redfish action heats up chilly waters

    Temperatures in the 60s have been heating up the inshore waters of Brunswick County, and though the water is still relatively cold, the action on redfish is hot.

    “We’re poling to get to them in the tidal pools of the shallow creeks,” said Capt. Mark Dickson of Shallow Minded Charters. “They’ve been a little bigger lately. We usually see lots of fish in the 16- to 20-inch class this time of year, but lately we have been catching lots of fish in the 22-to 26-inch class with an occasional 30-incher mixed in.”

  • Spring's arrival will bring plenty of redfish to Brunswick County

    Spring isn’t quite here yet, but it won’t be long before Brunswick County anglers will be out in force stalking those feisty spring redfish. Redfish travel in schools in the spring, cruising the shallows looking for shellfish and small fish to eat.

  • The Future of America's fishing industry

    Brant McMullan achieved some life goals when he attended and spoke Feb. 24 at the United We Fish rally at the U.S. Capitol to amend the Magnuson-Stevens Conservation and Management Act. But another goal—passage of a bill to amend the act—is still in doubt.

    “I thought it went really good,” McMullan said about the rally. “If I were to guess, 40 percent were from the New York-Massachusetts area, 40 percent from the Carolinas and the remainder from Florida, up and down the East Coast. A couple of people came from Alaska.”

  • Gill net fishing not yet at an end

    Gill net fishing in North Carolina may be coming to an end because of federal and environmental concerns about sea turtles, but commercial fishermen are not going down without a fight.

    In an effort to reach a compromise that will save North Carolina’s gill net fishing industry, the Marine Fisheries Commission (MFC) voted last Friday to continue to allow large mesh gill net fishing, restricting it to four days a week.

    The MFC had been considering eliminating large mesh nets from May 15 to Dec. 15 to prevent interactions with sea turtles.

  • In cold weather, anglers can target redfish

    The weather has been harsh on area fishermen, but that hasn’t stopped some anglers from getting out and catching a few winter redfish anyway.

    Capt. Mark Dickson of Shallow Minded Charters reports redfish have been biting well in the shallows despite bad conditions.

    “I fished (last week) and it was absolutely brutal, cold and windy,” Dickson said. “We only were out there about an hour but caught four small redfish 16-18 inches.”

  • FISH shows appreciation for troops

    North Carolina anglers have created a nonprofit organization dedicated to showing appreciation to the U.S military by taking service members fishing, including those who have been wounded in operations in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    Fishermen In Support of Heroes (FISH) organizes fishing experiences for American service members using the resources of North Carolina sportsmen volunteers and businesses, like fishing piers and charter boats. FISH became an official nonprofit corporation earlier this year.

  • OIFC to host bus trip to D.C. for fishermen's demonstration

    The Ocean Isle Fishing Center is joining with the Recreational Fishing Alliance and Southern Kingfishing Association in support of The Flexibility in Fishing Act, a bill that has been introduced in the U.S. House and Senate.

    Congressman Mike McIntyre is one of the co-sponsors of the bill, which is attempting to require more flexibility from the federal fishery managers, the NOAA, in managing stressed fish resources. This action and bill occurs as a result of total closures of several important fisheries and establishment of more and more “no fish” zones.

  • Recreational and commercial fishermen to rally for change in law

    Recreational and commercial fishermen will rally on the steps of the U.S. Capitol from noon to 3 p.m. Feb. 24 in an organized demonstration against what the Recreational Fishing Alliance says are “unintended negative impacts” of the Magnuson-Stevens Conservation and Management Act.

    “The closures keep coming, and it’s good to see the collective fishing communities and industries, both recreational and commercial, calling for scientific-based Magnuson reform,” said Jim Donofrio, executive director of the Recreational Fishing Alliance (RFA).

  • Winter weather puts the chill on inshore fishing

    Winter weather has hampered inshore fishing lately, although there are still some fish out there and they are biting. Fish stocks seem to have come through the chill in pretty good shape so far.

    “The weather here has been extremely cold and fish kills have been reported in scattered areas, speckled trout being the most common,” said Capt. Mark Dickson of Shallow Minded Charters.

    Redfish are among our most hearty fish and can be caught on days the weather allows fishing, although in really cold weather they tend to have lockjaw.