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Fishing

  • OIFC to host bus trip to D.C. for fishermen's demonstration

    The Ocean Isle Fishing Center is joining with the Recreational Fishing Alliance and Southern Kingfishing Association in support of The Flexibility in Fishing Act, a bill that has been introduced in the U.S. House and Senate.

    Congressman Mike McIntyre is one of the co-sponsors of the bill, which is attempting to require more flexibility from the federal fishery managers, the NOAA, in managing stressed fish resources. This action and bill occurs as a result of total closures of several important fisheries and establishment of more and more “no fish” zones.

  • Recreational and commercial fishermen to rally for change in law

    Recreational and commercial fishermen will rally on the steps of the U.S. Capitol from noon to 3 p.m. Feb. 24 in an organized demonstration against what the Recreational Fishing Alliance says are “unintended negative impacts” of the Magnuson-Stevens Conservation and Management Act.

    “The closures keep coming, and it’s good to see the collective fishing communities and industries, both recreational and commercial, calling for scientific-based Magnuson reform,” said Jim Donofrio, executive director of the Recreational Fishing Alliance (RFA).

  • Winter weather puts the chill on inshore fishing

    Winter weather has hampered inshore fishing lately, although there are still some fish out there and they are biting. Fish stocks seem to have come through the chill in pretty good shape so far.

    “The weather here has been extremely cold and fish kills have been reported in scattered areas, speckled trout being the most common,” said Capt. Mark Dickson of Shallow Minded Charters.

    Redfish are among our most hearty fish and can be caught on days the weather allows fishing, although in really cold weather they tend to have lockjaw.

  • Prepare for spring fishing with homemade rigs; it’s an effective way to catch fish

    It won’t be long until spring arrives and with it the annual rebirth of the fishing season. Although you can still catch some fish now, most anglers are counting the days until warm temperatures roll in and our usual inshore species start to stir.

    In the downtime, there are several things anglers can do to prepare for spring fishing. Fishing is a sport in which you pretty much get what you give, so if you give a lot of extra time to the craft, you’re sure to get a good return in the form of tugs on the line when the action starts.

  • Redfish, trout, black drum targeted by inshore fishermen

    The recent frigid cold spell caused some fish kills in the state but it doesn’t appear we were hurt too badly here in Brunswick County. To the north of us there were reported kills of speckled trout (and black drum) that ran into the thousands of fish in a few places, but so far that hasn’t happened here.

    Meanwhile, anglers are watching the state’s reaction to the upcoming sea turtle lawsuit and how that might affect large-mesh inshore gill nets.

  • Time to stock up on lures and begin preparing your tackle box for warm weather

    Not many people are wetting a line right now, since it’s just too darn cold for most folks to get out after the fish. There might be a few trout or drum around, but if there are, they’re pretty safe. Instead, local anglers are preparing for warmer weather and the inevitable burst of the spring fishing season.

  • Cold weather slows onshore fishing action

    Water temperatures have plummeted with the ultra-cold weather, so no one is doing much fishing of any kind right now. We have had relatively mild winters for a few years and fishing has not really stopped, but this year is obviously going to be a little different.

    Before the weather got really extreme, the winter bite was going pretty good. Capt. Mark Dickson of Shallow Minded Charters reports there was action out there.

  • Don't let winter's cold temperatures deter inshore fishing

    Inshore fishing right now is limited to those species that stick around during the cold months, but fishing for them has been good lately

    As usual in the winter, action is taking place in three distinct phases during the day: early morning and late afternoon for speckled trout and redfish, and nighttime for black drum. In addition, the hours just before and after low tide are often effective times.

  • First bluefin tuna of season hooked off Brunswick County coast

    The anticipation has been building over the past weeks as fishermen await the arrival of the giant bluefin tuna to our waters. Since 2005, these powerful and highly valuable fish have provided sport and much needed supplemental income to local fishermen. As this is still a new fishery to our area, every year the big question is, “I wonder if they’ll show.”

  • Inshore fishing heating up in December

    Despite the colder weather and periods of rain, inshore fishing has really heated up in December. All the usual winter species are in place and biting, and fish continue a late-season surge that has them on the move and feeding.

    I got into the black drum last week at Sunset Beach. After nightfall I could have had all the 12- to 14- inch black drum I wanted. Caught about 20 until they tired me out, and kept eight for supper.