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Fishing

  • Fall fishing looms as September arrives

    I have dusted off my blue jeans and unboxed my sweatshirts. I have my reels spooled and hooks sharp. The time is near for fall fishing to begin.

    The last couple of weeks the offshore fishing has not been incredible. We have been catching plenty of Spanish mackerel, amberjack and barracuda, but when it comes to the king mackerel and grouper, the fishing has just been plain tough. Much of this due to an anomaly known as a thermocline that formed about three weeks ago.

  • Fishing in late summer better than expected

    Fishing is turning out to be a bit better than I expected. Anglers haven’t been waiting for the fall but are filling up coolers with some nice fish despite the bad reputation of the late summer season. Flounder, redfish and black drum have all being biting for local fishermen.

    One reason may be the influence of Hurricane Bill, which roared by from a distance last week but caused some significant waves and pounded on the beaches. This wouldn’t be the first time the original storm of the hurricane season put the fish in a biting mood.

  • Baitfish, shrimp plentiful in late summer

    Local saltwater fishing is still stuck in a summertime pattern, as the game fish are not plentiful but are nice-sized and most of the action is in the morning or at night. Something not in short supply are the baitfish and shrimp, which are swarming through our waters right now.

  • August fishing exceeds expectations

    August is not considered one of the better months to fish from this area. The summer’s heat builds to a peak, which raises water temperatures above 80 degrees and typically sends the majority of fish either packing north or offshore. However, this August is showing if food is readily available, the predator fish will endure a bit of discomfort for a guaranteed meal.

    I hate to harp on it, but the pogies are absolutely thick all along the beaches, and it is helping our fishing exponentially.

  • Hot weather puts a damper on good fishing

    Despite hot days and windy conditions, anglers are still finding fish in our inshore waters. Flounder and redfish have given local fishermen some good action lately. The best thing about summer fishing is although the fish aren’t as numerous they tend to be larger.

    Capt. Mark Dickson of Shallow Minded Charters has had some successful trips lately, fishing both inshore and out at the jetties. I spoke to him Monday and he told me about fishing at the jetties earlier that day.

  • Fish and fishermen get back to work

    I thought the wind would never stop blowing. We missed almost an entire week of fishing trips because of strong southwest winds that kept seas running 3-5 feet and made fishing uncomfortable if not impossible.

    However, nature’s pendulum has swung back into our favor and as of Monday, the winds and seas subsided and have offered myself and Ocean Isle Fishing Center captains the opportunity to get back on the water and back to our jobs.

  • Time to target black drum and flounder

    The weather has been playing some games with fishermen, but during good weather there is a lot of bait in the water. Unfortunately, the game fish are not quite as numerous as the finger mullet and frisky shrimp, and though it feels as if fall should be here, it isn’t yet.

  • Increasing temperatures and wind slow fishing

    If you read last week, I painted a picture of great weather and great fishing. I was bragging on how good we’ve had it, all the bait, the comfortable temperatures….I knew as I was writing the report I would regret it.

  • Pompano a tasty, warm-water fish

    The beginning of August is usually a time for local anglers to look toward the cooler weather of fall, which will bring a sharp increase in the number of fish and their readiness to strike a baited hook. One fish, however, that is already very active is the pompano.

    Pompano are a warm-water fish that strike throughout the summer and provide a tasty catch for fishermen when other fish either aren’t present or aren’t feeding.

  • Summertime fishing can be a challenge; know when it's the right time to go

    Summertime fishing can be tough. Fish are sluggish during the heat of the day and the most productive hours come and go quickly in the morning or just before sunset. Some species, like speckled trout, stage a quick morning bite and then are gone from an angler’s radar, while others, like pompano, occur mainly in dribs and drabs while the sun is high in the sky.