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Fishing

  • Now is the right time to fish for speckled trout

    Local anglers have been dodging rain showers and getting in some decent fishing.

    Temperatures have remained steady enough that real fall fishing hasn’t kicked into gear yet, although the speckled trout don’t seem to know to wait and have been hitting well. Red drum and flounder are making up the bulk of the other inshore catches as folks wait for the spot to start running.

  • Fishing tournament honors injured hunter

    On Saturday, Sept. 26, fishermen will gather to support one of their own at the third annual Bay Creek Classic Flounder Tournament.

  • Anglers get ready for the big fall spot run

    We’ve had our first showing of spot on the piers, and anglers are poised for the big fall spot run.

    Last year was a disappointment, but there seems to be good signs this season will be better. Fall pier fishing remains a simple and rewarding fishing experience that brings out the kid in all of us.

  • Annual mullet run off to an early start

    The recent dip into autumn-like temperatures had anglers hoping fish would start gearing up for the fall runs. That didn’t exactly happen, but we are still seeing good fishing with quite a few big flounder, redfish and trout now out there around their usual inshore haunts.

    If fishing is this good now, it is possible this fall season will make up for last year’s disappointments.

  • Fall kingfish bite begins at local beaches

    When Mother Nature flipped the switch, she did not hold back. It has gone from summer to fall in a hurry, and I am not complaining.

    The mullet have been running the beach and the menhaden schools are lined up along the beachfront from Ocean Isle Beach to the Cape Fear. All the pieces are in place for one of the best fall king mackerel bites we’ve seen in years.

  • Good time to put flounder fillets on dinner table

    Flounder fishing really picked up in late August, and the tasty flatfish are the hottest bite out there right now. There are plenty of stocky redfish biting, and Spanish mackerel are hitting along the shore in the early mornings, but it is the flounder that have local anglers the most excited. Fishing for flounder should continue to be strong right through the fall.

  • Fall fishing looms as September arrives

    I have dusted off my blue jeans and unboxed my sweatshirts. I have my reels spooled and hooks sharp. The time is near for fall fishing to begin.

    The last couple of weeks the offshore fishing has not been incredible. We have been catching plenty of Spanish mackerel, amberjack and barracuda, but when it comes to the king mackerel and grouper, the fishing has just been plain tough. Much of this due to an anomaly known as a thermocline that formed about three weeks ago.

  • Fishing in late summer better than expected

    Fishing is turning out to be a bit better than I expected. Anglers haven’t been waiting for the fall but are filling up coolers with some nice fish despite the bad reputation of the late summer season. Flounder, redfish and black drum have all being biting for local fishermen.

    One reason may be the influence of Hurricane Bill, which roared by from a distance last week but caused some significant waves and pounded on the beaches. This wouldn’t be the first time the original storm of the hurricane season put the fish in a biting mood.

  • Baitfish, shrimp plentiful in late summer

    Local saltwater fishing is still stuck in a summertime pattern, as the game fish are not plentiful but are nice-sized and most of the action is in the morning or at night. Something not in short supply are the baitfish and shrimp, which are swarming through our waters right now.

  • August fishing exceeds expectations

    August is not considered one of the better months to fish from this area. The summer’s heat builds to a peak, which raises water temperatures above 80 degrees and typically sends the majority of fish either packing north or offshore. However, this August is showing if food is readily available, the predator fish will endure a bit of discomfort for a guaranteed meal.

    I hate to harp on it, but the pogies are absolutely thick all along the beaches, and it is helping our fishing exponentially.