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Fishing

  • Looking for a fight? Take on the red drum

    Red Drum range all along the Atlantic Coast, except in the coldest states up north. They are also found in the Gulf, where their population (and North Carolinas’) was once almost wiped out by the popularity of Louisiana Chef Paul Prudhomme’s “blackened redfish,” which caused the fish to jump from an occasional catch to a big deal for commercial fishermen.

  • Fishermen can survive difficult economic times

    We live in difficult economic times, and sports enthusiasts are certainly not immune to the effects of our nation’s current recession. From the up and down (and up again) price of gas to the fact most of us have far less money to spend on tackle, folks into fishing have felt the pinch on their favorite hobby along with all the other aspects of their lives.

    Therefore it was with great cheer we greeted some unexpected good news last week, as the sea-lovers among us learned one encouraging thing has come from the troubled circumstances surrounding our monetary crisis.

  • Redfish are a true cold-water treasure

    Although our local waters are home to a wide variety of saltwater game fish during the majority of the year, the list narrows considerably in the winter. Warm-water fish such as Spanish mackerel, bluefish and pompano long gone are roaming areas far to the south, while prized species such as flounder are wintering in deep offshore waters. Among anglers, late February and early March aren’t known for their diversity.

  • Fisherman can catch red drum, black drum in winter but target them differently

    There isn’t a lot of fishing going on now as water temperatures range from cold to colder, but if you are determined and hardy you can still find a drum or two out there. When it comes to being hardy, though, you can’t beat a drum. Both red and black drum are still swimming our local waters, and at times they’ll bite almost as well as they would in warmer weather.

  • Lures have come a long way in saltwater fishing

    It’s a season for boat shows and wandering the isles of the tackle shop. There is a lot to see out there now. Saltwater lures have come of age, and advancements in technology and wide distribution have created a huge market for artificial baits among inshore anglers. Every year lures seem to get more and more effective and the innovations of tackle manufactures get more diverse.

  • Although not associated with fresh fish, winter is a good time for tasty fish meals

    Winter is not usually associated with fresh fish, but among the few species available to local anglers are two that make terrific eating and fit perfectly in many good recipes. These are the speckled trout and the black drum, both of which can be caught throughout the year in all but the coldest weather. Specks are well known to seafood lovers as a culinary delight, while black drum lack the good reputation but are still a great fish to eat.

  • Brunswick: Bluefin tuna capital of the world

    Folks, as a fisherman, I can assure you what is happening here in our home waters of Brunswick County is an amazing thing. Somehow, through a magical formula only Mother Nature understands, we have been delivered a blessing of having the most famous, the most sought after, the most highly prized fish in the world set up winter headquarters right here in our own neighborhood. The giant bluefin tuna are here!

  • Cold, unstable weather affects speckled trout

    The weather is cold and unstable, and nobody is fishing much. Well, the birds are fishing, but birds are extremely talented and can catch fish through a blizzard. Anyone who has ever sat and watched them knows no angler can match the skill of our feathered friends. Few humans, however, are out casting about.

    There are redfish schools in the shallows (or so I am told) that might or might not be willing to bite on the warmer days. In truth, most are probably just content to chill out and hide from dolphins (who have some freakish fishing skills themselves).

  • Winter is a good time to fish for red drum in Brunswick County

    Despite water temperatures that have reached into the 40s, anglers still report spotting nice schools of red drum prowling the shallow waters. These fish will not always bite during the coldest periods, but on some days the sun warms up things enough to create a very favorable environment for targeting these winter redfish.

    Red drum can often be seen “tailing” in the shallows with their noses down and rooting up food while their tails are sticking up in the air. Some of these redfish schools are huge. Finding them, however, is just part of the task of redfishing.

  • Giant bluefin tuna season has begun

    I am happy to ring in the New Year with the good news the giant bluefin tuna have finally shown up off our coast.

    The season for this fishery typically starts in December and runs through January. Last season it was very slow off our area, but this season we had our hopes high. Much of the commercial netting of menhaden (giant bluefin tuna’s main food source) has been haulted off the Carolinas, and all indications were there was going to be much more baitfish presence this season.