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Fishing

  • Speckled trout emerge full force during April

    Last week I wrote about the nice redfish bite, and how those drum have been providing nonstop action all winter and into the early spring for local fishing guides like Capt. Mark Dickson.

    This week, I asked Dickson about the emerging speckled trout bite, since specks are a fish that anglers’ thoughts turn to in April the way a second baseman’s thoughts turn to base hits.

  • Spring fishing action is steady for red drum

    In many places, the spring fishing has started off slowly, but don’t tell that to the folks landing the big red drum in our inshore waters. Shallow-water anglers and fishing guides have reported steady action on nice-sized redfish throughout the entire winter, and the landings are impressive. While pier patrons wait on the whiting and bluefish and surf fishermen fight skates and small sharks, light-tackle anglers are having a ball in the backwaters on the dependable red drum.

  • Whiting an important fish for sportsmen--and a great fish for cooking

    The piers are opening in the Carolinas, and bottom fishermen are ready to fill their coolers. The fishing season usually takes a little while to start, especially ocean-side. One fish that often shows up early is the whiting. A dependable pier and surf catch, and a tasty dish, whiting are the bread and butter of our local piers until the spot decide to make an appearance.

  • With spring comes upswing in inshore fishing

    Spring is almost here, and with it comes the annual seasonal upswing in inshore fishing. A lot of bait will soon be filtering through our local waters, and the number of fish to choose from is about to dramatically increase. The water temperatures this year got a little bit colder than last winter, but not so much so they won’t quickly bounce back into prime range for good fishing.

  • Looking for a fight? Take on the red drum

    Red Drum range all along the Atlantic Coast, except in the coldest states up north. They are also found in the Gulf, where their population (and North Carolinas’) was once almost wiped out by the popularity of Louisiana Chef Paul Prudhomme’s “blackened redfish,” which caused the fish to jump from an occasional catch to a big deal for commercial fishermen.

  • Fishermen can survive difficult economic times

    We live in difficult economic times, and sports enthusiasts are certainly not immune to the effects of our nation’s current recession. From the up and down (and up again) price of gas to the fact most of us have far less money to spend on tackle, folks into fishing have felt the pinch on their favorite hobby along with all the other aspects of their lives.

    Therefore it was with great cheer we greeted some unexpected good news last week, as the sea-lovers among us learned one encouraging thing has come from the troubled circumstances surrounding our monetary crisis.

  • Redfish are a true cold-water treasure

    Although our local waters are home to a wide variety of saltwater game fish during the majority of the year, the list narrows considerably in the winter. Warm-water fish such as Spanish mackerel, bluefish and pompano long gone are roaming areas far to the south, while prized species such as flounder are wintering in deep offshore waters. Among anglers, late February and early March aren’t known for their diversity.

  • Fisherman can catch red drum, black drum in winter but target them differently

    There isn’t a lot of fishing going on now as water temperatures range from cold to colder, but if you are determined and hardy you can still find a drum or two out there. When it comes to being hardy, though, you can’t beat a drum. Both red and black drum are still swimming our local waters, and at times they’ll bite almost as well as they would in warmer weather.

  • Lures have come a long way in saltwater fishing

    It’s a season for boat shows and wandering the isles of the tackle shop. There is a lot to see out there now. Saltwater lures have come of age, and advancements in technology and wide distribution have created a huge market for artificial baits among inshore anglers. Every year lures seem to get more and more effective and the innovations of tackle manufactures get more diverse.

  • Although not associated with fresh fish, winter is a good time for tasty fish meals

    Winter is not usually associated with fresh fish, but among the few species available to local anglers are two that make terrific eating and fit perfectly in many good recipes. These are the speckled trout and the black drum, both of which can be caught throughout the year in all but the coldest weather. Specks are well known to seafood lovers as a culinary delight, while black drum lack the good reputation but are still a great fish to eat.