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Fishing

  • Lures have come a long way in saltwater fishing

    It’s a season for boat shows and wandering the isles of the tackle shop. There is a lot to see out there now. Saltwater lures have come of age, and advancements in technology and wide distribution have created a huge market for artificial baits among inshore anglers. Every year lures seem to get more and more effective and the innovations of tackle manufactures get more diverse.

  • Although not associated with fresh fish, winter is a good time for tasty fish meals

    Winter is not usually associated with fresh fish, but among the few species available to local anglers are two that make terrific eating and fit perfectly in many good recipes. These are the speckled trout and the black drum, both of which can be caught throughout the year in all but the coldest weather. Specks are well known to seafood lovers as a culinary delight, while black drum lack the good reputation but are still a great fish to eat.

  • Brunswick: Bluefin tuna capital of the world

    Folks, as a fisherman, I can assure you what is happening here in our home waters of Brunswick County is an amazing thing. Somehow, through a magical formula only Mother Nature understands, we have been delivered a blessing of having the most famous, the most sought after, the most highly prized fish in the world set up winter headquarters right here in our own neighborhood. The giant bluefin tuna are here!

  • Cold, unstable weather affects speckled trout

    The weather is cold and unstable, and nobody is fishing much. Well, the birds are fishing, but birds are extremely talented and can catch fish through a blizzard. Anyone who has ever sat and watched them knows no angler can match the skill of our feathered friends. Few humans, however, are out casting about.

    There are redfish schools in the shallows (or so I am told) that might or might not be willing to bite on the warmer days. In truth, most are probably just content to chill out and hide from dolphins (who have some freakish fishing skills themselves).

  • Winter is a good time to fish for red drum in Brunswick County

    Despite water temperatures that have reached into the 40s, anglers still report spotting nice schools of red drum prowling the shallow waters. These fish will not always bite during the coldest periods, but on some days the sun warms up things enough to create a very favorable environment for targeting these winter redfish.

    Red drum can often be seen “tailing” in the shallows with their noses down and rooting up food while their tails are sticking up in the air. Some of these redfish schools are huge. Finding them, however, is just part of the task of redfishing.

  • Giant bluefin tuna season has begun

    I am happy to ring in the New Year with the good news the giant bluefin tuna have finally shown up off our coast.

    The season for this fishery typically starts in December and runs through January. Last season it was very slow off our area, but this season we had our hopes high. Much of the commercial netting of menhaden (giant bluefin tuna’s main food source) has been haulted off the Carolinas, and all indications were there was going to be much more baitfish presence this season.

  • Newer artificial baits luring fisherman

    January is a great time for boat shows and tackle expos, and if you go to one you will see a bewildering selection of lures available for throwing at inshore saltwater fish. The Bass Pro Shop, Dick’s Sporting Goods, our fine local tackle shops and even the better Walmarts carry most of the same artificial choices. All of them work in the right situation, and you shouldn’t be reluctant to try some of the newer models out there gaining fame for their success.

  • Make use of fishing gear you got for Christmas now

    If you are looking to celebrate the New Year by breaking in that fishing gear you got for Christmas, there are still opportunities out there. Water temperatures are a little lower than what they were last year, but that is still warm enough for the area to hold some fish. Quite a few species are still active, with speckled trout topping the list for most winter anglers.

  • Location is key when finding fish in winter

    The weather has alternated between unusually warm and typically cold, but local inshore fishing has settled into its traditional winter pattern. That means fewer people are fishing but some coolers are still being filled.

    For the casual bottom angler and the surf fishermen there are targets out there, though they might not be easy to find. Fish are schooled up tight, meaning it isn’t hard to miss out on them if you are at the wrong spot at the wrong time. Some of them also tend to be more active at certain times of the day and night.

  • If you can stand the cold, you might be able to catch fresh fish

    Plenty of spot are in the waterways of Brunswick County right now, although few people know it. These spot show up every year after the pinfish have left. A lot of folks are unaware they are still around. These are not the bigger ones you might catch in the fall, but the medium-sized silver fish. I caught 40 the other night and could have had all I wanted. They were eaten pretty quickly; fresh fried spot in December are a great treat.