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Fishing

  • Now is good to time to fish black drum

    With cold weather having firmly settled in, inshore anglers are finding the going pretty tough. Unless, of course, they happen to be out looking for black drum, which are around in force and are likely to be the best thing happening until spring arrives.

    Black drum are decent fighters and good to eat, and they hit in local waters virtually year-round. Tolerant to extremes in temperature, even the coldest water doesn’t put them off the bite, which is why they are a popular fish in the winter.

  • Cool weather fishing proves good offshore

    This past week the weather broke for us a few days to get offshore and do some fishing. On Dec. 3, my wife, Amy, brother Barrett and their scuba diving instructor/friend Cameron Sebastian with Coastal Scuba joined me aboard the Carolina Cat for a day of fishing and diving.

    The plan was to run offshore to the edge of the Gulf Stream to try to catch a wahoo or two, then head inshore and do some diving and spear fishing for grouper and maybe find a lobster or two.

  • The fish don’t mind, they’re already wet

    The weather has been anything but stable over the past couple of weeks. There have been a few tolerable days in which fishermen have been able to venture offshore, but for the most part we’ve been relegated to boat maintenance.

    The shame of it is the fishing is actually very good right now. Over this past weekend the Ocean Isle Fishing Center hosted Capt. Kyle’s Thanksgiving Speckled Trout Classic. Despite a cold, soaking rain all day long, participants turned up with good catches of trout. The results were based on the heaviest three fish aggregate:

  • Advice on how to catch red drum during winter

    Cold weather means different things to different anglers. While some folks have put their rods away to wait for spring, others are still out there experiencing great action on schooled-up red drum. These drum, often called redfish, provide year-round sport for shallow-water anglers when other fish have run to warmer climates.

  • The reds are coming, the reds are coming—grab your fishing rod

    With colder water temperatures dictating inshore fishing, local anglers’ focus has fallen primarily on red drum and speckled trout.

    Of the two, redfish are already making a terrific showing while specks are popping up in their usual hit-or-miss style. Meanwhile, black drum are also being caught in many different locations and will probably be available no matter how cold the water gets.

  • Late November is the time for catching cold-water speckled trout

    Late November is the time many casual anglers pack up their fishing rods for spring, while a different breed of fishermen starts to get serious. These are the speckled-trout fanatics, a hardy cult who brave cold weather and biting wind to go after its favorite target with a bewildering variety of baits and lures that may or may not work, depending on the mood of this fickle fish.

  • Q&A with a top-fishing guide about speckled trout

    Capt. Rennie Clark has been fishing the coastal waters of North Carolina for more than 25 years. In Wilmington, his charters cover inshore and offshore areas from our own Brunswick County beaches all the way to the lower Neuse River. I recently asked him for some tips and advice regarding speckled trout fishing in the winter.

    Weeks: Why do so many speckled trout anglers wait until November or December to really start fishing for trout?

    Capt Rennie: Speckled trout are in our coastal waters all year but they bunch up in deeper pockets and holes in the fall.

  • Essay contest winner provided a memorable fishing experience

    Last week was a reminder to me about what fishing should really be about. Over the past 20 years I’ve been fortunate to have fished in many places and been a part of many incredible fishing adventures. I think I often lose sight of the great opportunities I’ve been afforded, and in retrospect, many so-called “unsuccessful” fishing trips would have truly been wonders in the eyes of someone else.

  • Don’t hang up your fishing rods yet

    It sure is quiet down on the coast this fall. In the midst of possibly the world’s worst economic downturn, the only ones making out to the good are the fish.

    The other problem we’ve had is the wind. It seems day after day the wind blows, changes direction and then blows again. It is only supposed to blow for a couple of days, then settle down for a couple of days. Combine the unsettled weather and dismal economy and you have the recipe for rebuilding fish stocks.

  • Don’t let the winter chill deter you

    Fishing has improved for some folks this week as anglers are beginning to focus on traditionally cold-weather species. Fish such as black and red drum, whiting and speckled trout will still provide a lot of action for folks as the fishing season comes to an end.

    One winter fish that has already made a surge is the black drum. Black drum can be caught all year, but they really come to the forefront in the colder months. They are among our most dependable fish when a lot of better-known species have left for warmer waters or aren’t biting in the cold.