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Fishing

  • Late fall fishing transition begins as temperatures cool

    And now to the next phase of the fishing experience. Late fall has officially arrived as temperatures this week plummet into the 30s. Beach water temperatures have fallen to the mid-60s and the fish are on the move. The spots will be running at their peak over the next week or two. Watch for the piers to be lined with fishermen facing north as a sign the bite is on.

  • Ready, set, wait—for fall fishing

    I am really starting to annoy myself with my own writing. Week after week I’ve reported how the fishing is “just about to crank up,” “almost here.” Yet here we are, still waiting. However, I can’t take the blame as Mother Nature has been throwing curveballs at us fishermen for the past several weeks.

  • Autumn is a great time of year for fishermen

    We have had storms and yellow butterflies, now all local anglers are waiting on are the fish.

    September gave us a blustery start to the fall fishing season, and while fish were caught, we haven’t seen the best of autumn yet. Inshore anglers will be out in force this month looking for an exclamation point on what has so far been a good year for recreational fishermen.

  • Fall fishing has arrived in Brunswick County

    Finally, the water has cleared, the air has cooled, the north winds are blowing and it is time to go fishing.

  • Dispelling myths about fish and fishing--the truth according to Weeks

    With the fall fishing season just about upon us, it is time to re-examine our local inshore fishing myths. I have addressed some of these before, but since they crop up every autumn, now is a good time to dust them off and either debunk or certify them. Once the fish start hitting, I’m in it for myself and I’m not telling you anything.

  • Brunswick was spared with Hanna

    It seems that almost every tropical storm or hurricane that hits the U.S. affects us in Brunswick County in some way. Most of the time it’s after the storm makes landfall and moves northeast, bringing lots of rain and increased winds. However, Hanna was a special case for us, as it put an absolute bull’s-eye on Brunswick County.

  • Piers are the place for pluggers--and they do catch fish

    You can walk the length of a local fishing pier in the fall and pass many rows of bottom-fishermen. First, there will be a few guys drowning minnows for flounder, and then gobs of spot anglers bunched up in hordes hoping for a run of fall yellow-bellies. These are generally calm people. Eventually, however, as you reach the deep end of the pier you may find a diverse pod of frenzied guys and girls casting and re-casting small plugs out into the water, lures that look for all the world like thin pencils with colored heads and three dangerous treble hooks attached to them.

  • Get ready--September signals start of fall fishing season

    September’s arrival signals the beginning of the fall fishing season, although it doesn’t always signal the arrival of fall fishing. The water temperature is often slower to cool down than the anglers are to warm up. There is no doubt, however, things are about to get a lot more interesting for anglers in our local waters.

  • Knot Kiddin' crew wins first place in Brunswick Islands Saltwater Classic

    Fishing on the appropriately named Knot Kiddin’ in the Brunswick Islands Saltwater Classic Saturday, David Mason’s crew landed the winning catch: a 48.70-pound king mackerel.

    “That is a big king mackerel,” said Hampstead resident Bill Collins, upon whose fishing line the fish struck.

    The catch also paid dividends in prize money. The Knot Kiddin’ crew of Collins, Mason, Matthew Collins and Zachary Mason earned $28,260.

  • What to do between seasons

    Mid-August to mid-September is sort of the stepchild of fishing seasons. The summer bite has mostly shut down, and the fall bite has yet to begin. The main reason for the slow down is from the high water temperatures.